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  • Prefixes in this forum are used to denote a persons gender, as well as their affiliation with the Union or the Confederate States, (CS/Gray for Confederates, US/Blue for Union), and their rank at the time the Civil War ended, which applies to the majority of men (Gold Stars apply to ranks of General, Silver Eagles to Union Colonels, 3 Silver Stars to Confederate Colonels). Confederate Generals have BG (Brigadier General), MG (Major General), and LG (Lieutenant General), among the gold stars used to denote their rank.
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⋆M★G⋆ Walker, William H. T.

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gentlemanrob

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 11, 2016
Location
NE Georgia - SC
William Henry Talbot Walker

Walker.jpg
Born:
November 26, 1816

Birthplace: Augusta, Georgia

Father: Freeman Walker 1780 – 1827
(Buried: Walker Family Cemetery, Augusta, Georgia)​
Mother: Mary Garlington Creswell 1787 – 1862
(Buried: Walker Family Cemetery, Augusta, Georgia)​
Wife: Mary Townsend 1843 – 1868
(Buried: Walker Family Cemetery, Augusta, Georgia)​
Children:

Mary Creswell Walker Schley 1847 – 1910​
(Buried: North Laurel Grove Cemetery, Savannah, Georgia)​
Hannah Townsend Walker Anderson 1848 – 1904​
(Buried: Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, New York)​
William Henry Talbot Walker Jr. 1856 – 1948​
(Buried: Walker Family Cemetery, Augusta, Georgia)​
Dr. Freeman Valentine Walker 1860 – 1933​
(Buried: Bluffton Cemetery, Bluffton, South Carolina)​
Adam Johnston Walker 1862 -​
Education:

1837: Graduated from West Point Military Academy (46th in class)​
Occupation before War:

1837: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, 6th Infantry Regiment​
1837 – 1838: 2nd Lt. United States Army, 6th Infantry Regiment​
1837: Wounded in neck, Shoulder, chest, left arm, and left leg​
1838: 1st Lt. United States Army, 6th Infantry Regiment​
1838: Resigned from United States Army on October 31st
1838 – 1845: 1st Lt. United States Army, 6th Infantry Regiment​
1845 – 1855: Captain United States Army, 6th Infantry Regiment​
1847: Wounded during Battle of Churchbusco, Mexico​
1847: Wounded during Battle of Molino del Rey, Mexico​
1849 – 1852: Recruiter for United States Army​
1854 – 1855: Commandant of Cadets at West Point Military Academy​
1855 – 1860: Major United States Army 10th Infantry Regiment​
1860: Resigned from United States Army on December 20th

Civil War Career:

1861: Colonel in the Georgia State Militia​
1861: Major General in the Georgia State Militia​
1861: Colonel in the Confederate Army, Infantry​
1861 -1863: Brigadier General of Confederate Army, Infantry​
1861: Participated in Pensacola, Florida
IMG_4753.JPG
1861 – 1863: Brigadier General of Georgia State Militia​
1863: Commander of Savannah, Georgia​
1863 – 1864: Major General of Confederate Army, Infantry​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Vicksburg, Mississippi​
1863: Commanded a Reserve Division at Battle of Chickamuga​
1864: Participated in the Georgia Campaign​
1864: Killed during the Battle of Atlanta, Georgia, shot thru his horse​

Died: July 22, 1864

Place of Death: Atlanta, Georgia

Cause of Death: Killed during the Battle of Atlanta

Age at time of Death: 47 years old

Burial Place: Walker Cemetery Augusta, Georgia

IMG_4752.JPG
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Polloco

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
He was actually a brigadier general for the CSA twice. He resigned in Oct. 1861 then was reappointed in 1863.
 
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Polloco

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Shotpouch! One of my very favorite nicknames. He was so named for his propensity to collect Union lead with his body. :smile:
I've heard that nickname before but I don't see where Walker was wounded except that one time that killed him. The "Through the Horse" wound. I think He was wounded in the Seminole war than again in the Mexican War. Was that nickname possibly from the massive mortal He received at Atlanta?
 

Eric Wittenberg

1st Lieutenant
Keeper of the Scales
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Location
Columbus, OH
I've heard that nickname before but I don't see where Walker was wounded except that one time that killed him. The "Through the Horse" wound. I think He was wounded in the Seminole war than again in the Mexican War. Was that nickname possibly from the massive mortal He received at Atlanta?
No. They were already calling him that in 1863.
 
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Lubliner

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
"Wounded in the horse"? Is that a synonym for something else.
That is alright! I am still trying to get a grip on his wife (1843-1868) with children born in 1847, '48, '56, '60, and '62?
Surely, I believe that is the matrimonial spread, and not the life longevity. Plus I believe a cannonball through the horse does not stop the ball from passing through the man holding the reins.
Lubliner.
 
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