★★★ -Walker, Joseph Alfred

Joseph Alfred Walker:
:CSA1stNat:
Born: May 18, 1835
Colonel Walker.jpeg

Birthplace: Spartanburg County South Carolina
Father: Jacob Allen Walker 1812 – 1867
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Mother: Susan Cannon 1812 – 1851
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Wife: Susan Elizabeth Wingo 1839 – 1900
(Buried: Oakwood Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Children:
Alice Walker Lee 1866 – 1922
(Buried: Oakwood Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Felix Alexander Walker 1869 – 1870
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Susan Josephine Walker Harris 1871 – 1943
(Buried: Oakwood Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Joseph Alfred Walker 1874 – 1881
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)

Occupation before War:
Clerk and Merchant in Spartanburg South Carolina

Civil War Career:
1861 – 1862: Captain Company K 5th​ South Carolina Infantry Regt.
1862: Lt. Colonel Palmetto Sharpshooters Regiment
1862 – 1865: Colonel Palmetto Sharpshooters Regiment
1864 – 1865: South Carolina State Representative

Occupation after War:
Merchant and Bank President in Spartanburg South Carolina


Died: January 27, 1902
Place of Death: Spartanburg South Carolina
Age at time of Death: 66 years old
After War.jpg

Burial Place: Oakwood Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina



Obit.jpg
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Joseph Alfred Walker:
:CSA1stNat:
Born: May 18, 1835View attachment 383545
Birthplace: Spartanburg County South Carolina
Father: Jacob Allen Walker 1812 – 1867
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Mother: Susan Cannon 1812 – 1851
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Wife: Susan Elizabeth Wingo 1839 – 1900
(Buried: Oakwood Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Children:
Alice Walker Lee 1866 – 1922
(Buried: Oakwood Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Felix Alexander Walker 1869 – 1870
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Susan Josephine Walker Harris 1871 – 1943
(Buried: Oakwood Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)
Joseph Alfred Walker 1874 – 1881
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina)

Occupation before War:
Clerk and Merchant in Spartanburg South Carolina

Civil War Career:
1861 – 1862: Captain Company K 5th​ South Carolina Infantry Regt.
1862: Lt. Colonel Palmetto Sharpshooters Regiment
1862 – 1865: Colonel Palmetto Sharpshooters Regiment
1864 – 1865: South Carolina State Representative

Occupation after War:
Merchant and Bank President in Spartanburg South Carolina


Died: January 27, 1902
Place of Death: Spartanburg South Carolina
Age at time of Death: 66 years oldView attachment 383546
Burial Place: Oakwood Cemetery Spartanburg South Carolina



View attachment 383547
I believe Walker commanded the brigade at Antietam, while Jenkins had been wounded at Second Manassas
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
The Palmetto Sharpshooters were formed from his old unit, the 5th South Carolina Infantry, and other units. Walker was made Lt. Colonel of this new regiment. Colonel Micah Jenkins commanded this unit. Walker took over command at 2nd Bull Run when Jenkins was wounded.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
The Palmetto Sharpshooters were formed from his old unit the 5th South Carolina Infantry and other units. Walker was made Lt. Colonel of this new regiment. I believe Colonel Micah Jenkins commanded this unit.
Yes. Jenkins decided to form his own elite regiment and so he had volunteers from his 5th and I believe the 6th South Carolina as well to form the unit.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Micah Jenkins went on to a generalship and divisional command and Walker took over this brigade in Jones' division from 2nd Bull Run to Antietam, and Fredricksburg. He accompanied Longstreet to the West including Chickamauga and Knoxville. Back to Virginia for the Wilderness Campaign afterwhich he took a seat in the state legislature.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
There was big money in guano importation. The soil of the south was very much depleted from over production of cotton before and after the war. Fertilzer, including guano and ground up buffalo bones I think, were expected to help "rebuild the south". I'm guessing on this comment but that's the way I remember it.
 

Lubliner

1st Lieutenant
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Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
There was big money in guano importation. The soil of the south was very much depleted from over production of cotton before and after the war. Fertilzer, including guano and ground up buffalo bones I think, were expected to help "rebuild the south". I'm guessing on this comment but that's the way I remember it.
Land reclamation projects were carried on due to tobacco depleting the soil too, in places like North Carolina and Virginia. The reports I remember were from captures by both sides on the shipping through the Caribbean Sea. There was an overseas market as well, and when the Chesapeake Bay was closed off to trade, one last shipment of guano was allowed to leave port, if I remember right.
Lubliner.
 
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