{⋆★⋆} MG Walker, John George

John George Walker

:CSA1stNat:
Major General Walker.png


Born: July 22, 1821

Birthplace: Jefferson City, Missouri

Father: John Walker 1772 – 1838
(Buried: Woodland – Old City Cemetery, Jefferson City, Missouri)​

Mother: Sarah “Sallie” Caffery 1781 – 1849
(Buried: Woodland – Old City Cemetery, Jefferson City, Missouri)​

Wife: Sophia Mary “Mammy” Baylor 1838 – 1931
(Buried: Mount Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, Virginia)​

Children:

Sophie Annie Walker 1859 – 1909​
John George Walker 1860 – 1861​
Grace Courtenay Walker 1862 – 1888​
(Buried: Mount Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, Virginia)​
Alice Ashmore Walker Rogers 1864 – 1902​
(Buried: Mount Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, Virginia)​
Frances Agnes Walker 1867 –​
Louise T. Walker 1874 – 1950​
Mary Lee Walker James 1876 – 1956​
(Buried: Mount Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, Virginia)​
Lt. Philip Everett Meade Walker 1877 – 1936​
(Buried: Mount Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, Virginia)​

Education:

1844: Graduated from Washington University​

Occupation before War:

1846 –1851: 1st Lt. in United States Army, Mounted Rifles​
1847: Wounded during Battle of Molino del Rey, Mexico​
1851 – 1861: Captain in United States Army, Mounted Rifles​
1861: Resigned from the United States Army in July of 1861​

Civil War Career:

1861: Lt. Colonel of 8th Texas Cavalry Regiment
After War.jpg
1861 – 1862: Served in the Department of North Carolina​
1861 – 1862: Colonel of 8th Texas Cavalry Regiment​
1862: Brigadier General of Confederate Army Infantry​
1862: Brigade Commander during Peninsula Campaign, Virginia​
1862: Wounded during the Battle of Malvern Hill, Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander during the Battle of South Mountain​
1862: Brigade Commander during the Battle of Antietam, Maryland​
1862 – 1865: Major General of Confederate States Army Infantry​
Served in the Trans – Mississippi Confederate Department​
Commander of Walker's Greyhounds​
1864: Brigade Commander Battle of Mansfield, Louisiana​
1864: Brigade Commander Battle of Jenkins Ferry, Arkansas​
Commander of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana​
Commander of the District of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona
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Occupation after War:

Lived in Exile in Mexico for many years​
United States Counsel in Bogota, Colombia​
Special Commissioner to Pan – American Convention​

Died: July 21, 1893

Place of Death: Washington, D.C.

Cause of Death: Cerebral Hemorrhage, apoplexy, coma, paralysis

Age at time of Death: 71 years old

Burial Place: Stonewall Confederate Cemetery, Winchester, Virginia
 
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Polloco

Major
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Didn't the 8th Texas Cavalry fight at Bull Run?
I kind of doubt it, unless there was another organization known by that number at Bull Run.I'm at a loss here, The Eight or Terry's Texas Rangers weren't organized until August of 1861. The orginal intent was to send them to Virginia but they wound up in the Western Theater. Their first skirmish was on Dec. 17, 1861 according to wikapedia.
 

John Wolf Smith

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Nov 6, 2019
Location
Canada

Polloco

Major
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Interesting read and I thank you for it but it doesn't list J.G Walker as a member of that bunch, or did I miss it? I lost my glasses several weeks ago. Plus it don't exactly say the whole Eight Texas Cavalry was at Bull Run. Col. Terry is listed as having been there with a small group of men?. My guess is, maybe, that the Independent Texas Cavalry called themselves the Eighth at the very beginning of the war. Then Terry's Texas Rangers took on that number when they were formed at Houston,after Bull Run.I could be wrong and have been many times. Anyone want to jump in with an answer?
 

Luke Freet

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Forum Host
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Nov 8, 2018
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Palm Coast, Florida
Interesting read and I thank you for it but it doesn't list J.G Walker as a member of that bunch, or did I miss it? I lost my glasses several weeks ago. Plus it don't exactly say the whole Eight Texas Cavalry was at Bull Run. Col. Terry is listed as having been there with a small group of men?. My guess is, maybe, that the Independent Texas Cavalry called themselves the Eighth at the very beginning of the war. Then Terry's Texas Rangers took on that number when they were formed at Houston,after Bull Run.I could be wrong and have been many times. Anyone want to jump in with an answer?
He may have been A Texas Ranger, but not part of the Texas Ranger Regiment.
Presumably the unit was not called the 8th, that that's historians going back and identifying it as such in association with the future unit.
 

rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
Member of the Year
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May 18, 2011
Location
Carlisle, PA
Walker led one of the brigades(?) when Stonewall Jackson converged on Harper's Ferry with 3 columns just before joining Lee and fighting at Antietam. Actually it was a division he was leading at this time , wasn't it?

It was a 2 brigade division consisting of his own (under Colonel Van Manning of the 3rd Arkansas) and Robert Ransom's North Carolinians.

Ryan
 

Polloco

Major
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
The Lost Order or Special Order No. 191 contains these words about General Walker ...."General Walker, with his division , after accomplishing the object in which he is now engaged , will cross the Potomac at Cheek's Ford, ascend its right bank to Lovettsville, take possession of Loudoun Heights, if practicable, by Friday morning , Key's Ford on his left, and the road between the end of the mountain and the Potomac on his right. He will, as far as practicable, co-operate with General McLaws and General Jackson in intercepting the retreat of the enemy". It also contained the following..."The commands of Generals Jackson, McLaws, and Walker , after accomplishing the objects for which they have been detached, will join the main body of the army at Boonsborough or Hagerstown".
 
Joined
Aug 9, 2011
Location
Lockhart, Texas
Usually "underperforming" generals were exiled to western theaters like the TransMississippi. But that was not always the case. Maybe they needed a good man out there.

They did indeed need a good man out there, and as a Texan, I'm glad Taylor and Walker had the reins of the army in Louisiana in '63 and '64. With less skilled and aggressive commanders, I'm confident Texas would have been successfully invaded from Louisiana. Calling Walker's Division "greyhounds' is no misnomer. They marched and marched, blocking and interfering with the forward elements of the Union army. And if you've ever hiked in Louisiana, you know how fast the heat and humidity can sap all the strength and energy from a man. Perhaps the fact that Walker's Division was the only all-Texas division in the Confederate army and they knew they were marching and fighting to defend their home state just across the Sabine River made the difference. Sure couldn't have hurt their motivation to keep marching and their fury in battle.
 

Trevfo

Private
Joined
May 6, 2020
Location
Texas
My g-g-grandfather was one of the Greyhounds, 11th TX infantry, Co. I. Fought at Bayou Bourbeau, Mansfield and Jenkin's Ferry. Oran Roberts, future TX supreme court justice, TX governor and "father" of the University of Texas, was his commanding officer for a time.
 
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