{⋆★⋆} BG Maney, George E.

George Earl Maney

:CSA1stNat:
General Maney.jpg


Born: August 24, 1826

Birth Place: Franklin, Tennessee

Father: Judge Thomas Maney 1794 – 1864
(Buried: Mount Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tennessee)​

Mother: Annie R. 1800 – 1866
(Buried: Mount Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tennessee)​

Wife: Elizabeth T. “Betty” Crutcher 1834 – 1910

Children:


Frances “Fannie” Maney 1855 –​
Jane Maney 1856 –​
Rebecca Maney Waters 1858 – 1948​
(Buried: Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Kentucky)​
Maria Cage Maney 1860 – 1896​
Thomas Maney 1865 – 1944​

Education:

1845: Graduated from University of Nashville​

Occupation before War:

1846 – 1848: Served in the Mexican War rising to 1st Lt. U.S. Dragoons​
1850 – 1861: Attorney in Franklin, Tennessee​

Civil War Career:

1861: Captain in 11th Tennessee Infantry Regiment​
1861 – 1862: Colonel of 11th Tennessee Infantry Regiment​
1861: Participated in the Battle of Cheat Mountain​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Shiloh​
1862 – 1865: Brigadier General in the Confederate Army Infantry​
1863: Wounded in the arm during the Chattanooga Campaign​
1864: Captured during the Atlanta Campaign​
1865: Surrendered at Greensboro, North Carolina​

Occupation after War:

President of Tennessee, and Pacific Railroad Company​
Active member of the Republican Political Party​
Tennessee State Senator​
1881 – 1882: United States Minister to Columbia​
1882 – 1883: United States Counsel General to Bolivia
IMG_8490.JPG
1884: Delegate to Republican Party National Convention​
1888: Delegate to Republican Party National Convention​
1890 – 1894: United States Minister to Paraguay​

Died: February 9, 1901

Place of Death: Washington, D.C.

Cause of Death: Cerebral Hemorrhage

Age at time of Death: 74 years old

Burial Place: Mount Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tennessee

IMG_8509.JPG
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Maney is one of those commander's you don't hear much about, but was one of the more prominent field commanders of the war.
He commanded a brigade of Tennesseans from after Shiloh to the Atlanta Campaign, taking command of Cheatham's division during the later portions of the campaign. He led it at Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, and Kennesaw Mountain, where his men stood at the apex of the Dead Angle.
Also, Sam Watkins served in his brigade.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
The article mentions a Col. Luckett from Texas. Would that be Col. Phillip N. Luckett who commanded the 3rd Texas?
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
The article mentions a Col. Luckett from Texas. Would that be Col. Phillip N. Luckett who commanded the 3rd Texas?
I believe so. I have not read up much on Luckett's postwar career. However, it may be a case of "He was in the wrong place at the wrong time". It only says he was a suspect.
Wouldn't be the first time Confederate officers would kill eachother postwar in stupid feuds (for example: Liddell-Jones Feud.)
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
1864: Captured during the Atlanta Campaign
A bit of an error. Maney was not captured during the Atlanta Campaign. In fact, he served from start to finished in the Campaign (if you considered Jonesboro to be the end of the campaign). He commanded Cheatham's Division during the fighting around the city, as Cheatham was elevated to Corps command. He gave up command after the first day at Jonesboro, as his wounds from Chattanooga were acting up.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Ok
A bit of an error. Maney was not captured during the Atlanta Campaign. In fact, he served from start to finished in the Campaign (if you considered Jonesboro to be the end of the campaign). He commanded Cheatham's Division during the fighting around the city, as Cheatham was elevated to Corps command. He gave up command after the first day at Jonesboro, as his wounds from Chattanooga were acting up.
Did he give up command voluntarily was he relieved at Jonesboro?
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Ok

Did he give up command voluntarily was he relieved at Jonesboro?
From what I've read, it was a voluntary decision. His wound was acting up, and so he handed command over to John Carter (the then ranking officer of the division) for the actions of the 2nd day. He never returned to command because he was constantly on leave to recuperate; he was apparently involved in the Franklin-Nashville Campaign, but was in no condition to command (hence why the division was commanded by Mark Lowrey of Cleburne's division after Franklin). He likely acted as an Aide de Camp of Cheatham. Again, sources are sketchy on this.
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/th...ney-of-cheathams-division.130535/post-1462286
 
Top