★ ★  ARTY Hunt, Henry Jackson

Henry Jackson Hunt
:us34stars:
Hunt 1.jpg


Born: September 14, 1819

Birthplace: Detroit, Michigan

Father: Samuel Wellington Hunt 1799 – 1829

Mother: Julia Ann Herrick 1799 – 1827

1st Wife: Emily Caroline DeRussy 1831 – 1857
(Buried: Saint Johns Church Cemetery, Hampton, Virginia)​

2nd Wife: Mary Bethune Craig 1836 – 1911
(Buried: U.S. Soldiers and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.)​

Children:

Emily De Russy Hunt 1852 – 1873​
(Buried: Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Lemay, Missouri)​
Lt. Henry Jackson Hunt Jr. 1855 – 1886​
(Buried: U.S. Soldiers and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.)​
Conway Bethune Hunt 1861 – 1947​
(Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.)​
Maria Bethune Hunt 1862 – 1938​
(Buried: U.S. Soldiers and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.)​
Dr. Presley Craig Hunt 1871 – 1910​
(Buried: U.S. Soldiers and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.)​
Colonel John Elliott Hunt 1874 – 1951​
(Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia)​

Education:

1839: Graduated West Point Military Academy – (19th in class)​

Occupation before War:

1839 – 1846: 2nd Lt. United States Army 2nd Artillery​
1846 – 1852: 1st Lt. United States Army 2nd Artillery​
1847: Brevetted Captain for Gallant Service at Contreras & Churchbusco​
1847: Wounded twice during the Mexican War​
1847: Brevetted Major for Gallantry at Battle of Chapultepec​
1852 – 1861: Captain United States Army, 2nd Artillery​

Civil War Career:
Hunt.jpg


1861 – 1863: Major United States Army, 5th Artillery​
1861: Chief of Artillery Washington, D.C. Defenses​
1861 – 1862: Colonel in the Union Army​
1861 – 1862: Organizer of Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac​
1861 – 1862: Member of the Board for Arming Fortifications​
1862 – 1866: Brigadier General of Union Army Artillery​
1862: Commander Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac​
1862 – 1864: Chief of Artillery, Army of the Potomac​
1863: Brevetted Colonel United Army, Artillery​
1863 – 1869: Lt. Colonel United States Army, 3rd Artillery​
1864: Brevetted Major General United States Army Artillery​

1865: Brevetted Brigadier General, United States Army Artillery​
1865: Commander of Camp of Instruction near Blandensburg, Maryland
After War.jpg
1866: President of Permanent Artillery Board​
1866: Mustered out of Union Army on April 30, 1866​

Occupation after War:

1866 – 1869: Lt. Colonel United States Army, 3rd Artillery​
1869 – 1883: Colonel United States Army, 5th Artillery​
1883: Retired from United States Army on September 14th​
1885 – 1889: Governor of Soldier’s Home Washington, D.C.​

Died: February 11, 1889
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Place of Death: Washington, D.C.

Cause of Death: Pneumonia

Age at time of Death: 69 years old

Burial Place: U.S. Soldiers and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Odd I would have thought the wasting of artillery ammunition would have been one of the main concerns of The Confederate Army at Gettysburg. And it probably was. Especially being as how they were "farther from home"and only had what brought with them. But from reading about this man, He too was concerned about the Unions supply. Maybe it was a concern of both armies?
 

Lubliner

Captain
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
His rank of command during the war looks mixed up to me. He is a Colonel in 1862 and soon becomes a Brigadier General, so I assume it is a rank that took affect by being backdated. In 1863 he is Lt. Colonel and brevetted a Colonel, but it seems that rank was already attained in 1861-1862. Then his brevet rank for Major General is a year before his brevet for brigadier general, but that appears to be when his rank was backdated. But he is given the rank of Lt. Colonel after the war in 1866 without the brevet. It sounds like the army headquarters bounced his rank up and down to meet the challenge of command and seniority among the Divisional and Corps commanders. Is my assumption accurate?
Thanks,
Lubliner.
 

gentlemanrob

Brigadier General
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 11, 2016
Location
South Carolina
His rank of command during the war looks mixed up to me. He is a Colonel in 1862 and soon becomes a Brigadier General, so I assume it is a rank that took affect by being backdated. In 1863 he is Lt. Colonel and brevetted a Colonel, but it seems that rank was already attained in 1861-1862. Then his brevet rank for Major General is a year before his brevet for brigadier general, but that appears to be when his rank was backdated. But he is given the rank of Lt. Colonel after the war in 1866 without the brevet. It sounds like the army headquarters bounced his rank up and down to meet the challenge of command and seniority among the Divisional and Corps commanders. Is my assumption accurate?
Thanks,
Lubliner.

Well he was in the Union Army and United States Army so the ranking is confusing
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
He was one of 3 officers who,as a board, revised field artillery.This 1856 board consisted of Henry J.Hunt, William H, French, and William F. Barry. Together they wrote the manual, "The Instructions for Field Artillery". It was published in 1861 by the War Department and became the"bible" of Northetn field artillerists.
 
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