{⋆★⋆} GEN Hood, John Bell

John Bell “Sam” Hood

:CSA1stNat:

Born:
June 1, 1831
General Hood 1.jpg


Birthplace: Owingsville, Kentucky

Father: Dr. John Willis Hood 1798 – 1852
(Buried: French Cemetery, Montgomery County, Kentucky)​

Mother: Theodosia French 1801 – 1886
(Buried: French Cemetery, Montgomery County, Kentucky)​

Wife: Annie Marie Hennen 1837 – 1879
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Louisiana)​

Married: April 30, 1868 in New Orleans, Louisiana

Children:

Lydia Marie Hennen Hood 1869 – 1879​
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Louisiana)​
Anna Bell Hood 1870 – 1934​
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Louisiana)​
Ethel Genevieve Hood 1870 – 1956​
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Louisiana)​
John Bell Hood Jr. 1871 – 1947​
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Louisiana)​
Colonel Duncan Norbert Hood 1873 – 1920​
(Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia)​
Lillian Marie Hood Post 1874 – 1966​
(Buried: Saint Bernards Cemetery, Bernardsville, New Jersey)​
Marie Marion Hood 1874 – 1895
General Hood.jpg
Odile Musson Hood Holland 1876 – 1919​
(Buried: Woodland Cemetery, Manhattan, New York)​
Ida Richardson Hood 1876 – 1961​
(Buried: Bowling Green Cemetery, Woodville, Mississippi)​
Oswald Hood 1878 – 1929​
(Buried: Woodland Cemetery, Manhattan, New York)​
Anna Gertrude Hood 1879 – 1880​
(Buried: Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Georgia)​

Signature:
Hood.png


Education:

1853: Graduated from West Point Military Academy (44th in class)​

Occupation before War:

1853 – 1855: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, Infantry Regiment​
1853 – 1854: Garrison Duty at Fort Columbus, New York​
1854 – 1855: Frontier Duty at Fort Jones, California​
1855 – 1858: 2nd Lt. United States Army, 2nd Cavalry Regiment​
1855: Escort for Lt. Williamson’s Topographical Party​
1856 – 1857: Frontier Duty at Fort Mason, Texas​
1857: Wounded at Devil’s Run, Texas​
1857 – 1858: Frontier Duty at Fort Mason, Texas​
1858 – 1861: 1st Lt. United States Army, 2nd Cavalry Regiment​
1858 – 1859: Frontier Duty at Camp Cooper, Texas​
1859 – 1860: Frontier Duty at Camp Wood, Texas​
1860 – 1861: On Leave of Absence from U.S. Army​
1861: Resigned from United States Army on April 16th

Civil War Career:

1861: Captain of Confederate Army Cavalry
General Hood 2.jpg
1861: Lt. Colonel of Confederate Army Cavalry​
1861: Served under General John B. Magruder training cavalry​
1861 – 1862: Colonel of 4th Texas Infantry​
1862: Brigadier General of Confederate Army Infantry​
1862: Participated in the Peninsula Campaign​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Gaines Mill​
1862: Participated in the Northern Virginia Campaign​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Antietam​
1862 – 1863: Major General of Confederate Army Infantry​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg​
1863: Participated in the Siege of Suffolk, Virginia​
1863: Wounded in the left arm during Battle of Gettysburg​
1863 – 1865: Lt. General of Confederate Army Infantry​
1863: Wounded in the right thigh during battle of Chickamuga​
1863 – 1864: Sent to Richmond Virginia recover from amputation of leg​
1864: Corps Commander in the Army of Tennessee, Georgia Campaign​
1864: Temporary General of Confederate Army Infantry​
1864 – 1865: Temporary Commander Army of Tennessee​
1864: Led Army of Tennessee during Atlanta Campaign​
1864: Led Army of Tennessee during Battle of Franklin, Tennessee​
1864: Led Army of Tennessee losing at Battle of Nashville, Tennessee
General Hood after war.jpg
1865: Surrendered himself at Natchez, Mississippi​
1865: Paroled by the United States Army and Government​

Occupation after War:

Cotton Broker in New Orleans, Louisiana​
President of Life Association of America Insurance Business​
Assisted in fundraisers for orphans​

Died: August 30, 1879

Place of Death: New Orleans, Louisiana

Cause of Death: Yellow Fever

Age at time of Death: 48 years old

Burial Place: Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Louisiana

IMG_7452.JPG
IMG_7464.JPG


IMG_7467.JPG
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
John Bell “Sam” Hood:
Born: June 1, 1831
Birthplace: Owingsville KentuckyView attachment 360801
Father: Dr. John Willis Hood 1798 – 1852
(Buried: French Cemetery Montgomery County Kentucky)
Mother: Theodosia French 1801 – 1886
(Buried: French Cemetery Montgomery County Kentucky)
Wife: Annie Marie Hennen 1837 – 1879
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery New Orleans Louisiana)
Married: April 30, 1868 in New Orleans Louisiana
Children:
Lydia Marie Hennen Hood 1869 – 1879
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery New Orleans Louisiana)
Anna Bell Hood 1870 – 1934
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery New Orleans Louisiana)
Ethel Genevieve Hood 1870 – 1956
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery New Orleans Louisiana)
John Bell Hood Jr. 1871 – 1947
(Buried: Metairie Cemetery New Orleans Louisiana)
Colonel Duncan Norbert Hood 1873 – 1920
(Buried: Arlington National Cemetery Arlington Virginia)
Lillian Marie Hood Post 1874 – 1966
(Buried: Saint Bernards Cemetery Bernardsville New Jersey)
Marie Marion Hood 1874 – 1895View attachment 360802
Odile Musson Hood Holland 1876 – 1919
(Buried: Woodland Cemetery Manhattan New York)
Ida Richardson Hood 1876 – 1961
(Buried: Bowling Green Cemetery Woodville Mississippi)
Oswald Hood 1878 – 1929
(Buried: Woodland Cemetery Manhattan New York)
Anna Gertrude Hood 1879 – 1880
(Buried: Linwood Cemetery Columbus Georgia)


Education:
1853: Graduated from West Point Military Academy (44th​ in class)

Occupation before War:
1853 – 1855: Brevet 2nd​ Lt. United States Army Infantry Regiment
1853 – 1854: Garrison Duty at Fort Columbus New York
1854 – 1855: Frontier Duty at Fort Jones California
1855 – 1858: 2nd​ Lt. United States Army 2nd​ Cavalry Regiment
1855: Escort for Lt. Williamson’s Topographical Party
1856 – 1857: Frontier Duty at Fort Mason Texas
1857: Wounded at Devil’s Run Texas
1857 – 1858: Frontier Duty at Fort Mason Texas
1858 – 1861: 1st​ Lt. United States Army 2nd​ Cavalry Regiment
1858 – 1859: Frontier Duty at Camp Cooper Texas
1859 – 1860: Frontier Duty at Camp Wood Texas
1860 – 1861: On Leave of Absence from U.S. Army
1861: Resigned from United States Army on April 16th​

Civil War Career:

1861: Captain of Confederate Army CavalryView attachment 360803
1861: Lt. Colonel of Confederate Army Cavalry
1861: Served under General John B. Magruder training cavalry
1861 – 1862: Colonel of 4th​ Texas Infantry
1862: Brigadier General of Confederate Army Infantry
1862: Participated in the Peninsula Campaign
1862: Participated in the Battle of Gaines Mill
1862: Participated in the Northern Virginia Campaign
1862: Participated in the Battle of Antietam
1862 – 1863: Major General of Confederate Army Infantry
1862: Participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg
1863: Participated in the Siege of Suffolk Virginia
1863: Wounded in the left arm during Battle of Gettysburg
1863 – 1865: Lt. General of Confederate Army Infantry
1863: Wounded in the right thigh during battle of Chickamuga
1863 – 1864: Sent to Richmond Virginia recover from amputation of leg
1864: Corps Commander in the Army of Tennessee Georgia Campaign
1864: Temporary General of Confederate Army Infantry
1864 – 1865: Temporary Commander Army of Tennessee
1864: Led Army of Tennessee during Atlanta Campaign
1864: Led Army of Tennessee during Battle of Franklin Tennessee
1864: Led Army of Tennessee losing at Battle of Nashville TennesseeView attachment 360804
1865: Surrendered himself at Natchez Mississippi
1865: Paroled by the United States Army and Government

Occupation after War:
Cotton Broker in New Orleans Louisiana
President of Life Association of America Insurance Business
Assisted in fundraisers for orphans


Died:
August 30, 1879
Place of Death: New Orleans Louisiana
Cause of Death: Yellow Fever
Age at time of Death: 48 years old
Burial Place: Metairie Cemetery New Orleans Louisiana





View attachment 360805

View attachment 360806

View attachment 360807
I remember visiting family in East Texas a few years back (Jefferson/Jeffersonville I believe it was). Went to this local bar for lunch one day. They had massive portraits of Robert E. Lee and John Bell Hood on their wall near the entrance.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Hood is one of the more controversial figures of the Confederate army. His record as an aggressive commander was well earned when he led the Texas Brigade at Eltham's Landing and Gaines Mill; then as a temporary division commander at Second Bull Run and Antietam; as the official division commander at Gettysburg where he was wounded in the arm; and leading Longstreet's Corps in its grand assault on the last day of Chickamauga, losing his leg in the process. From that point on, his career took a comparative nose dive. His leadership of the AoT's 2nd Corps was rather poor considering his previous engagements; his promotion to Army commander was due to political intrigues and led to 3 bloody and poorly executed battles around Atlanta; and nearly destroyed his army, the most powerful Confederate force capable of offensive manuevering, in the Franklin-Nashville Campaign.
However, there has been attempts to resurrect his legacy by his descendant Stephen Hood. I have not read his work as of this post, but I have heard that the claims he was strapped to his horse and on sedatives during the Atlanta Campaigns are false, and that he had recovered use of his wounded arm by early 1864. I have his book on my shopping list, though that's gotten quite long with all of my other projects on the doc.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
He was placed under arrest by General Nathan Evans after the 2nd Battle of Bull Run after a dispute over some captured ambulances. General Lee released him on the morning of South Mountain. Hood and his division then went on to distinguish himself at Antietam.
Though he only commanded a brigade while Hood was commanding a division, Evans was technically senior in rank and pulled it to have Hood arrested.
Evans and his brigade would soon be transferred out of the AoNV to Charleston after the Antietam Campaign, and Hood promoted to Major General.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Hood is a complicated figure for me. On the one hand, he was much more strategically and operationally creative than Joe Johnston or even Bragg in command of the Army of Tennessee; his conceptions for Peachtree Creek, Bald Hill, the Railroad Campaign, and the Tennessee Campaign all had their merits. However, his inabilty to take control of an unfolding battle, and his tactical decision therein, resulted in failure after failure.
I've recently bought For Cause and For Country, and was disgusted with Hood reading how after Jonesborough he lay the blame for the failures not only on his subordinates like Hardee (who in some ways deserves it as his senior subordinate and de facto field commander) but also insults his own troops, saying they hadn't carried out the assaults with enough vigor. Despite the merits I listed above, I find this attitude espoused by certain generals during this war to be downright deplorable; it is degrading your hardcore veterans, many of whom are chastizing their comrades who've chosen to desert in these late stages of the war, only to get this talk from your commander that you weren't "fighting hard enough".
 

jackt62

Captain
Member of the Month
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Location
New York City
He was placed under arrest by General Nathan Evans after the 2nd Battle of Bull Run after a dispute over some captured ambulances. General Lee released him on the morning of South Mountain. Hood and his division then went on to distinguish himself at Antietam.
Being placed under arrest in the Confederate armies was almost like a rite of passage. Aside from Hood, there were Garnett, AP Hill, and McLaws to name a few notable commanders who were also in the same situation at one time or another.
 

jackt62

Captain
Member of the Month
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Location
New York City
after Jonesborough he lay the blame for the failures not only on his subordinates like Hardee (who in some ways deserves it as his senior subordinate and de facto field commander) but also insults his own troops, saying they hadn't carried out the assaults with enough vigor.
I believe that Hood also referred to this in his memoir, "Advance and Retreat." His reasoning had to do with his aversion to fighting behind entrenchments, a common practice in both armies by 1864, and which Hood also faulted Johnston for instilling in the troops. Hood took the position that soldiers would be reluctant to carry out offensive assaults given the common practice of digging trenches, building breastworks, and installing head logs at the end of each day's march. Additionally, Hood was raised in the tradition of the offensive minded spirit of the ANV during 1862, when under leaders such as Lee and Jackson, direct assaults for better or worse were common.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
In my ignorance, I suppose, I cannot understand his thinking at Franklin.
I will say, given the poor positioning of Wagner's division allowing Cleburne and Brown to break through the center of the Union line, it could have gone a lot differently if it weren't for Opdycke disobeying Wagner and remaining behind as a reserve. Maybe if instead of the full front attack, Cheatham and Stewart struck Wagner's line Chickamauga assault column style and could have overwhelmed the union forces there.
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
When was the above photo of him on crutches taken?
I thought he lost his arm at Gettysburg but I dont trust my memory. So this must have been taken after recovery of his wound at Chickamauga.
 
Top