{⋆★⋆} MG Hill, Daniel Harvey

Daniel Harvey Hill

:CSA1stNat:
1626094106280.png


Born: July 12, 1821

Birth Place: York District, South Carolina

Father: Solomon Hill 1776 – 1825

Mother: Nancy Cabeen 1779 – 1851

Wife: Isabella Morrison 1825 – 1904
(Buried: Davidson College Cemetery, Davidson, North Carolina)​
Married: 1848

Children:

Robert Hall Morrison Hill 1850 – 1857​
(Buried: Davidson College Cemetery, Davidson, North Carolina)​
Willie Morrison Hill 1855 – 1856​
(Buried: Davidson College Cemetery, Davidson, North Carolina)​
Nancy Lee Hill 1857 – 1938​
(Buried: Davidson College Cemetery, Davidson, North Carolina)​
James Irwin Hill 1864 – 1866​
(Buried: Davidson College Cemetery, Davidson, North Carolina)​

Education:
After war.jpg

1842: Graduated from West Point Military Academy (28th in class)​

Occupation before War:

1842 – 1849: Served in United States Army, rising to Major​
1849 – 1854: Mathematics Professor at Washington College​
1850 – 1861: Author of Essays for Southern Quarterly​
1854 – 1859: Mathematics Professor at Davidson College​
1856: Author of “Consideration of the Sermon on the Mount”​
1858: Author of “Elements of Algebra”​
1859 – 1861: Superintendent of North Carolina Military Institute​
1860: Author of “Crucifixion of Christ”​

Civil War Career:

1861: Colonel of 1st North Carolina Infantry​
1861: Commander of Department of the Peninsula​
1861: Participated in the Battle of Big Bethel​
1861 – 1862: Brigadier General of Confederate Army, Infantry​
1861: Commander Department of Fredericksburg​
1861: Commander of District of Pamlico​
1862: Participated in the Peninsula Campaign​
1862 – 1865: Major General of Confederate Army, Infantry​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Seven Pines​
1862: Participated in the Seven Days Campaign​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Antietam​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg​
1863: Led Confederate troops protecting Richmond, Virginia​
1863: Sent to serve in the Army of Tennessee​
1863: Received the Provisional Promotion of Lt. General​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Chickamuga, Tennessee​
1863 – 1864: Commanded as a Volunteer in the Army​
1865: Participated in the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina​
1865: Surrendered with General Joseph E. Johnston's Army
IMG_2072.JPG

Occupation after War:

1866 – 1872: Editor of a Magazine called The Land We Love
1877 – 1884: President of Arkansas Industrial University​
1885 – 1889: President of Military & Agriculture College, Milledgeville​

Died:
September 24, 1889

Place of Death: Charlotte, North Carolina

Cause of Death: Hemorrhoids, Arthritic Problems

Age at time of Death: 68 years old

Burial Place: Davidson College Cemetery, Davidson, North Carolina

IMG_5226.JPG
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
The Corps he led at Chickamauga was Hardee's old Corps. He was critical of Bragg for not following up at Chickamauga.Bragg and Jefferson Davis being good friends created a "situation" for Hill. He lost his Corps Command and Davis refused to submit Hill's nomination as Lt.. Gen, to the senate. Hill thus reverted back to Major General.on October 15, 1863. He then became a volunteer on Gen. Beauregard's staff.
 

jackt62

Captain
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Location
New York City
I'm always curious about the fact that D.H. Hill's reputation gets somehow diminished. He started off the war with a victory (albeit a small one) at Big Bethel and had respectable command performances during the Peninsula, Seven Days, and Antietam campaigns. Then all of a sudden, he falls into disfavor with Lee and later on with Bragg and Davis and he mostly drops off the radar screen. There are the usual explanations; blame (misplaced) for losing Special Order 191, his sarcastic or off putting personality, involvement in political intrigue with the anti-Bragg faction. Maybe other reasons as well?
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Hard to read a biography about Hill without coming across the word "brother-in-law", and one normally thinks of Stonewall Jackson. But General Rufus Barringer was also a brother-in-law for a while. Eugenia Morrison (Isabella's sister)married him in the 50s but passed away in 1858, I think.
 

uaskme

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
SE Tennessee
I'm always curious about the fact that D.H. Hill's reputation gets somehow diminished. He started off the war with a victory (albeit a small one) at Big Bethel and had respectable command performances during the Peninsula, Seven Days, and Antietam campaigns. Then all of a sudden, he falls into disfavor with Lee and later on with Bragg and Davis and he mostly drops off the radar screen. There are the usual explanations; blame (misplaced) for losing Special Order 191, his sarcastic or off putting personality, involvement in political intrigue with the anti-Bragg faction. Maybe other reasons as well?
He had a poor performance at McLemore Cove and Chickamauga. Bragg had his problems, D H Hill was one of them. No one who ended up politically on the wrong side of Davis had a bright future in the military.

Lee sent him West for some reason?
 

LetUsHavePeace

Volunteer
Joined
Dec 1, 2018
"Probably we may be influenced by an undue partiality for our own people. But we cannot agree with this estimate of the General. We cannot believe that a race which gave birth to Washington, Lee, Calhoun, Clay, Macon, Lowndes, Randolph, Pinckney, Henry, can be inferior to the races we have described — to Yankees and negroes, Germans and Irish. True, the united mass subdued us. The Huns subjugated the Roman Empire; but was Attila superior to Julius Caesar, or the race from which he sprang, to the race which conquered and civilized the world?"

D. H. Hill, "Character of the Southern People as Established by the Events of the Late War"

https://archive.org/details/landwelove00hillgoog/page/n780/mode/2up
 
"Probably we may be influenced by an undue partiality for our own people. But we cannot agree with this estimate of the General. We cannot believe that a race which gave birth to Washington, Lee, Calhoun, Clay, Macon, Lowndes, Randolph, Pinckney, Henry, can be inferior to the races we have described — to Yankees and negroes, Germans and Irish. True, the united mass subdued us. The Huns subjugated the Roman Empire; but was Attila superior to Julius Caesar, or the race from which he sprang, to the race which conquered and civilized the world?"

D. H. Hill, "Character of the Southern People as Established by the Events of the Late War"

https://archive.org/details/landwelove00hillgoog/page/n780/mode/2up
Very interesting quote.
 

Frank Watson

Private
Joined
Oct 27, 2014
Maybe the most entertaining writer of algebra textbooks in the world's history.

The field of battle at Buena Vista is 6 1/2 miles from Saltillo. Two Indiana volunteers ran away from the field of battle at the same time; one ran half a mile per hour faster than the other, and reached Saltillo 5 minutes and 54 6/11 seconds sooner than the other. Required their respective rates of travel.
 

rbasin

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Jan 31, 2013
Location
Tampa, Fl
Yeah. He ebbs and wanes with me. He could have been the south's best western corps commander had he not opened his mouth against Bragg. I was just thinking not too long ago about how the Atlanta campaign might have been different had Johnston had Hill and Longstreet as corps commanders, or wing commanders.
 

uaskme

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
SE Tennessee
Yeah. He ebbs and wanes with me. He could have been the south's best western corps commander had he not opened his mouth against Bragg. I was just thinking not too long ago about how the Atlanta campaign might have been different had Johnston had Hill and Longstreet as corps commanders, or wing commanders.
It would of been different.

Hill Lied to Bragg at McLemore’s Cove. Told him Cleburne was sick and couldn’t advance. Hill led the fiasco where he had a 3 to 1 force advantage and let Negley escape. He and Bragg were good friends in Mexico. Hill’s reception out here is described as Cool. Polk wanted the AOT split 3 ways on 9/20 to include Hill. Bragg didn’t trust him, less than Polk, which he had a low opinion of. Hill didn’t disappoint. It is all curious.
 
Top