BMG  ★  Grierson, Benjamin Henry

Benjamin Henry Grierson

:us34stars:
Grierson.jpg


Born: July 8, 1826

Birthplace: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Father: Robert Crittenden Grierson 1789 – 1867
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

Mother: Mary Sheppard 1788 – 1862
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

1st Wife: Alice Kirk 1828 – 1888
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

2nd Wife: Lillian Atwood 1850 – 1914
(Buried: Diamond Grove Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

Children:

John Kirk Grierson – 1858​
(Buried: Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois)​
Colonel Charles Henry Grierson 1855 – 1928​
(Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia)​
Robert Kirk Grierson 1860 – 1922​
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​
Edith Clare “Edie” Grierson 1865 – 1878​
(Buried: Fairmont Cemetery, San Angelo, Texas)​
Benjamin Henry Grierson Jr. 1867 – 1934​
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​
Theodore MacGregor Grierson 1869 – 1950​
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​
Mary Louise Grierson 1871 – 1871​
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

Education:

Attended Academy in Youngstown, Ohio​

Occupation before War:

Afraid of horses since the age of 8 when he was kicked by a horse​
Music Teacher and Band Leader in Jacksonville, Illinois​

Civil War Career:

1861: Aide to Major General Benjamin M. Prentiss​
1861 – 1862: Major of 6th Illinois Cavalry Regiment​
1862 – 1863: Colonel of 6th Illinois Cavalry Regiment​
1862 – 1863: Served in Skirmishes on railroads and facilities​
1862: Served in the Pursuit of Major General Earl Van Dorn​
1863: Commander of Grierson’s Raid during Vicksburg Campaign​
1863: Helped demoralize Confederates in Louisiana and Mississippi​
1863: General Sherman said his raid the most brilliant expedition​
1863: Served in the Siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana​
1863 – 1865: Brigadier General of Union Army Volunteers​
1864: Cavalry Division Commander in the Meridian Campaign​
1864: Cavalry Division Commander at Battle of Brice’s Crossroads​
1864: Union Army Commander of Cavalry in Western Tennessee​
1864: Cavalry Commander at the Battle of Tupelo, Mississippi​
1864 – 1865: Leader of Expedition against Mobile and Ohio Railroad​
1864: Captured Forrest’s dismounted camp at Verona, Mississippi​
1864: Captured an ad hoc Confederate Force at Egypt Station, Mississippi​
1865: Brevetted Major General for his service in the War​
1865: Participated in the Capture of Mobile, Alabama​

Occupation after War:

1866 – 1890: Colonel, United States Army, 10th Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers​
1867 – 1869: United States Army, Commander of Fort Riley​
1868 – 1869: United States Army Commander, District Indian Territory​
1869 – 1872: United States Army Commander, Post of Camp Wichita​
1873 – 1874: Superintendent of U.S. Army Mounted Recruiting Service​
1875 – 1878: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Concho, Texas​
1878 – 1880: U.S. Army Commander of District of the Pecos​
1882: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Davis, Texas
Grierson1.jpg
1883: U.S. Army Commander of the Department of Texas​
1885 – 1886: U.S. Army Commander of Whipple Barracks​
1886 – 1888: U.S. Army Commander of District of New Mexico​
1888 – 1890: U.S. Army Commander of Department of Arizona​
1890: Brigadier General in United States Army​
1890: Retired from United States Army on July 8th
1890 – 1911: Lived Retired at his homes in Illinois and Michigan​
1907 – 1911: Suffered from the effects of a Stroke he had in 1907​

Died:
August 31, 1911

Place of Death: Omena, Michigan

Cause of Death: Debility and paralysis

Age at time of Death: 85 years old

Burial Place: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Despite his prewar fear of horses, Grierson became probably the best Union cavalry commander in the Western Theater. He and Edward Hatch would go on to command the 2 Colored Cavalry Regiments after the war.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Col. Grierson made this observation after His raid..."The strength of the rebels has been over--estimated. They have neither the arms nor the resources we have given them credit for. Passing through their country, I found thousands of good Union men, who were ready and anxious to return to their allegiance the moment they could do so with safety to themselves and families.They will rally around the flag by scores whenever our army advances. I could have brought away a thousand with me, who were anxious to come--- men whom I found fugitives from their homes, hid in the swamps and forests , where they were hunted like wild beasts by conscripting officers with blood-hounds."
 

Virginia Dave

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Location
Waynesboro, Virginia
Benjamin Henry Grierson

:us34stars:View attachment 365204

Born: July 8, 1826

Birthplace: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Father: Robert Crittenden Grierson 1789 – 1867
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

Mother: Mary Sheppard 1788 – 1862
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

1st Wife: Alice Kirk 1828 – 1888
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

2nd Wife: Lillian Atwood 1850 – 1914
(Buried: Diamond Grove Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

Children:

John Kirk Grierson – 1858​
(Buried: Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois)​
Colonel Charles Henry Grierson 1855 – 1928​
(Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia)​
Robert Kirk Grierson 1860 – 1922​
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​
Edith Clare “Edie” Grierson 1865 – 1878​
(Buried: Fairmont Cemetery, San Angelo, Texas)​
Benjamin Henry Grierson Jr. 1867 – 1934​
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​
Theodore MacGregor Grierson 1869 – 1950​
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​
Mary Louise Grierson 1871 – 1871​
(Buried: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois)​

Education:

Attended Academy in Youngstown, Ohio​

Occupation before War:

Afraid of horses since the age of 8 when he was kicked by a horse​
Music Teacher and Band Leader in Jacksonville, Illinois​

Civil War Career:

1861: Aide to Major General Benjamin M. Prentiss​
1861 – 1862: Major of 6th Illinois Cavalry Regiment​
1862 – 1863: Colonel of 6th Illinois Cavalry Regiment​
1862 – 1863: Served in Skirmishes on railroads and facilities​
1862: Served in the Pursuit of Major General Earl Van Dorn​
1863: Commander of Grierson’s Raid during Vicksburg Campaign​
1863: Helped demoralize Confederates in Louisiana and Mississippi​
1863: General Sherman said his raid the most brilliant expedition​
1863: Served in the Siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana​
1863 – 1865: Brigadier General of Union Army Volunteers​
1864: Cavalry Division Commander in the Meridian Campaign​
1864: Cavalry Division Commander at Battle of Brice’s Crossroads​
1864: Union Army Commander of Cavalry in Western Tennessee​
1864: Cavalry Commander at the Battle of Tupelo, Mississippi​
1864 – 1865: Leader of Expedition against Mobile and Ohio Railroad​
1864: Captured Forrest’s dismounted camp at Verona, Mississippi​
1864: Captured an ad hoc Confederate Force at Egypt Station, Mississippi​
1865: Brevetted Major General for his service in the War​
1865: Participated in the Capture of Mobile, Alabama​

Occupation after War:

1866 – 1890: Colonel, United States Army, 10th Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers​
1867 – 1869: United States Army, Commander of Fort Riley​
1868 – 1869: United States Army Commander, District Indian Territory​
1869 – 1872: United States Army Commander, Post of Camp Wichita​
1873 – 1874: Superintendent of U.S. Army Mounted Recruiting Service​
1875 – 1878: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Concho, Texas​
1878 – 1880: U.S. Army Commander of District of the Pecos​
1882: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Davis, TexasView attachment 365205
1883: U.S. Army Commander of the Department of Texas​
1885 – 1886: U.S. Army Commander of Whipple Barracks​
1886 – 1888: U.S. Army Commander of District of New Mexico​
1888 – 1890: U.S. Army Commander of Department of Arizona​
1890: Brigadier General in United States Army​
1890: Retired from United States Army on July 8th
1890 – 1911: Lived Retired at his homes in Illinois and Michigan​
1907 – 1911: Suffered from the effects of a Stroke he had in 1907​

Died:
August 31, 1911

Place of Death: Omena, Michigan

Cause of Death: Debility and paralysis

Age at time of Death: 85 years old

Burial Place: Jacksonville East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Illinois
1594346135709.png

Thanks for the information. I can't believe how many new veterans that you have brought to my attention. Of course being from the South not a lot was said about Union soldiers. LOL Thanks again.
 

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