★  Greene, George Sears

George Sears “Pap” Greene

Born: May 6, 1801
Greene.jpg


Birthplace: Apponaug, Rhode Island

Father: Caleb Greene 1772 – 1853
(Buried: Major Gen. George Sears Greene Lot, Warwick, Rhode Island)

Mother: Sarah Robinson Greene 1774 – 1838
(Buried: Major Gen. George Sears Greene Lot, Warwick, Rhode Island)​

1st Wife: Elizabeth Vinton 1805 – 1832
(Buried: Major Gen. George Sears Greene Lot, Warwick, Rhode Island)​

2nd Wife: Martha Dana 1809 – 1883
(Buried: Major Gen. George Sears Greene Lot, Warwick, Rhode Island)​

Children:

Mary Vinton Greene 1829 – 1833​
(Buried: Major Gen. George Sears Greene Lot, Warwick, Rhode Island)​
George Sears Greene Jr. 1830 –​
(Buried: Major Gen. George Sears Greene Lot, Warwick, Rhode Island)​
Francis Vinton Greene 1832 – 1833​
(Buried: Major Gen. George Sears Greene Lot, Warwick, Rhode Island)​
U.S. Navy Commander Samuel Dana Greene 1840 – 1884​
(Buried: Juniper Hill Cemetery, Bristol, Rhode Island)​
Major Charles Thurston Greene 1842 – 1923​
(Buried: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Brookfield, Connecticut)​
Major General Francis Vinton Greene 1850 – 1921​
(Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia)​

Education:

1823: Graduated from West Point Military Academy – (2nd in class)​

Occupation before War:

1823: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1823 – 1829: 2nd Lt. United States Army, 3rd Artillery​
1823 – 1824: Assistant Math Professor at West Point​
1824: Assistant Math Instructor in the Artillery School of Practice​
1824 – 1826: Assistant Math Professor at West Point​
1826 – 1827: Assistant Engineering Professor at West Point​
1827: Served on Ordnance Duty for United States Army​
1827 – 1828: Garrison Duty at Fort Wolcott, Rhode Island​
1829 – 1836: 1st Lt. United States Army, 3rd Artillery​
1828 – 1829: Garrison Duty at Fort Sullivan, Maine​
1829 – 1830: Garrison Duty at Fort Independence, Massachusetts​
1831 – 1835: Garrison Duty at Fort Sullivan, Maine​
1835: Ordnance Duty for United States Army​
1836: Resigned from United States Army on June 30th
1836 – 1847: Worked as Civil Engineer​
1847 – 1849: Chief Engineer of Portland and Kennebec Railroad​
1850 – 1852: Chief Engineer of Portland and Kennebec Railroad​
1852: Engineer of location for Albany and Susquehanna Railroad​
1852 – 1856: Chief Engineer for Providence and Bristol Railroad​
1860 – 1862: Engineer in charge of waterworks for New York City​

Civil War Career:
Greene 1.jpg


1862: Colonel of 60th New York Infantry Regiment​
1862: Guard of Communications between Baltimore & D.C.​
1862 – 1866: Brigadier General of Union Army Volunteers​
1862: Served in the Battle of Cedar Mountain, Virginia​
1862: Served in the skirmish at White Sulphur Spring​
1862: Served in the Battle of Antietam, Maryland​
1862: Served in the Defense of Harper’s Ferry​
1862 – 1863: Served in the Shenandoah Valley​
1863: Served in the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia​
1863: Served in the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania​
1863: Served in the pursuit of the enemy at Warrenton, Virginia​
1863: Guarded the line of the Rappahannock​
1863: Wounded in left side of jaw at Battle of Wauhatchie, Tennessee​
1863: Absent from the army due to his wounds until December​
1863 – 1865: Served on Court Martial Duty​
1865: His horse was shot from under him at Battle of Kinston, North Carolina​
1865: Served in the March to Goldsborough, North Carolina​
1865: Brevetted Major General for his service in the War​
1865: Served under Sherman march from Goldsborough to D.C.​
1865: Served Garrison Duty in Washington, D.C.​
1865 – 1866: Served on Court Martial Duty​
1866: Mustered out of the Union Army on April 30th

Occupation after War:
Greene 2.jpg

1866 – 1897: Suffered from malnutrition due from his wounds​
His Jaw wound produced a salivary fistula requiring surgery​
1866 – 1868: Engineer in charge of Croton Water Works Extension​
1868 – 1870: Chief Engineer & Commissioner Croton Aqueduct Board​
1870 – 1871: Assistant Engineer New York City Dept. of Public Works​
1871 – 1872: Engineer for Central Underground Railway​
1871 – 1872: Chief Engineer of Public Works in Washington, D.C.​
1872 – 1873: Consulting Engineer for New York City Dept. of Public Parks​
1873: Engineer for approving plans for Elevated Railway of New York City​
1873: Engineer for examining surveys of Ship Canal​
1873: Member of Engineering Commission for testing Water Meters​
1874 – 1875: Engineer for examining projects in New York City​
1875 – 1877: Engineers Examining Communications on Harlem River​
1875 – 1876: Member of Engineering board on Sewage Providence Rhode Island​
1877: Engineer for enlarging water works of Troy, New York​
1881: Member of Board of Visitors at West Point Military Academy​
1894: 1st Lt. United States Army Artillery Retired from Active Service​

Died: January 28, 1899

Place of Death: Morristown, New Jersey

Cause of Death: Cardiac failure from age and atheroma

Age at time of Death: 97 years old

Burial Place: Major Gen. George Sears Greene Lot, Warwick, Rhode Island
 
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Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
General Greene was already quite aged when he defended Culp's Hill at Gettysburg. I neglected to read much into him afterwards, noted his brigade was later commanded by other officers, assumed he had retired. But apparently, he was still actively leading troops (in the Carolinas) to the end of the war, and seems to have been active until his death at the end of the century.
The man lived from the Presidency of Thomas Jefferson to that of McKinley. Almost 100 years. Made of different stuff, can tell.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
His command of the 60th New York Infantry was because they were dissatisfied with their Col. and requested another commander. Gov. Edwin Morgan offered this job to Greene. During this same time period Gov.John Andrew of Massachusetts also prepared to offer Greene a Regiment. Greene chose the New York regiment.
 

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