{⋆★⋆} MG Gordon, John Brown

John Brown Gordon

Born: February 6, 1832
General Gordon.jpg


Birthplace: Upson County, Georgia

Father: Rev Zachariah Herndon Gordon 1796 -
(Buried: Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Georgia)​

Mother: Malinda Cox 1805 – 1867
(Buried: Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Georgia)​

Wife: Fannie Rebecca Haralson 1837 – 1931
(Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Georgia)​
Married: September 18, 1854, at Myrtle Hill, near La Grange, Georgia

Children:

Hugh Haralson Gordon 1855 - 1937​
(Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Georgia)​
Frank Gordon 1858 – 1907​
(Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.)​
John Brown Gordon Jr. 1865 - 1884​
(Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Georgia)​
Frances “Fannie” Haralson Gordon Smith 1868 – 1951​
(Buried: Dublin Town Cemetery, Dublin, New Hampshire)​
Caroline Lewis Gordon Brown 1872 – 1943​
Carolina Gordon 1877 – 1877​
(Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Georgia)​

Education:
After War.jpg


1851 – 1852: Attended University of Georgia but didn't graduate​

Occupation before War:

Attorney in Atlanta, Georgia​
Half Owner of Castle Rock Coal Company​

Civil War Career:

1861: Captain in 6th Alabama Infantry​
1861: Participated in the first Battle of Bull Run​
1861 – 1862: Major of 6th Alabama Infantry​
1862 – 1863: Colonel of 6th Alabama Infantry
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1862: Participated in the Battle of Williamsburg​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Seven Pines​
1862: Participated in the Seven Days Campaign​
1862: Wounded by five minie balls in his leg, arm and face during the Battle of Antietam, and survived​
1863 – 1864: Brigadier General in Confederate Army​
1863: Participated in Battles of Chancellorsville & Gettysburg​
1864 – 1865: Major General in the Confederate Army​
1864: Division Commander in the 2nd Army Corps​
1864 – 1865: Commander of 2nd​ Army Corps, Army of Northern Virginia​

1865: Made the last charge of Army of Northern Virginia, Appomattox​
John B. Gordon 1.JPG
1864 – 1865: Commander of 2nd Army Corps, Army of Northern Virginia
1865: Made the last charge of Army of Northern Virginia, Appomattox​

Occupation after War:

Attorney in Atlanta Georgia​
Grand Dragoon of the Georgia Branch of the Ku Klux Klan​
1873 – 1880: United States Senator from Georgia​
1880: Promoter of the Georgia Pacific Railroad​

John B. Gordon.JPG
1886 – 1890: Governor of Georgia​
1890 – 1904: Commander in Chief of United Confederate Veterans​
1891 – 1897: United States Senator from Georgia​
1903: Publishes Reminiscences of the Civil War, his first person account of the war.​

Died: January 9, 1904

Place of Death: Miami, Florida

Cause of Death: Malaria

Age at time of Death: 71 years old

Burial Place: Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Georgia

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Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Location
Palm Coast, Florida
Got another Gordon question, He is sometimes referred to as a Lt. General. But there is no record of his commission as such. He doesn't even mention it in this book "Reminiscences of the Civil War". Was Major General as high as he got?
Yes. MG is his highest rank. Given he had only been promoted to MG in May or June of 1864, which, by April of 1865 made him that rank for less than a year. He took command of the Corps partially out of the fact he was the senior surviving commander, Jubal Early remaining in the Shenandoah.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
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Location
Palm Coast, Florida
General Gordon is certainly one of the more colorful figures of the Eastern Theater. Starts the war just a backwoods Lawyer with no prior military training, and ends the war as Lee's most trusted subordinate. Was referred to by his own men as a "god of war" for his intense charisma in battle. Took 5 bullets at Antietam, yet managed to crawl back to friendly line and recover with minimal loss of bodily functions. Known for several bold actions, such as his late flank attack at the Wilderness, the surprise assault on Cedar Creek, and the desperate action at Fort Stedman. As a general, I have nothing but admiration for this man.
As for politics...he's certainly one of the most deplorable politicians in the state's history. He was a member of the infamous Bourbon Triumvirate, and his stances on race issues was complicated, to say the least.
I would highly recommend Ralph Lowell Eckert's biography on the man to get the best view of probably the most extreme extrovert of the Army of Northern Virginia.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Location
Palm Coast, Florida
Bumping for Antietam.
Gordon's survival at the Sunken Road is one of the most incredible stories of the war. The Georgia-born Colonel of the 6th Alabama helped to repulse French's initial assault, only for concentrated rifle fire from Richardson's division began cutting into the position. Gordon was shot 4 times, in his legs, torso, and arms, but continued to command his unit, until a fifth bullet knocked him unconscious, nearly drowning in his cap from the pooling blood, only to be saved by a bullet hole in the cap. When he had awoken, his successor Ltc. Lightfoot gave the wrong order and had caused the rout of the Confederate line, leaving Gordon in a no man's land along the Sunken Road position. After contemplating whether he was still alive or not, he managed to crawl his way back to friendly lines, where he was sent to a nearby barn. His beloved wife Fanny visited, and was horrified at the sight of his bullet ridden body; he consoled her by saying he had just attended an Irish wedding. Shockingly, despite his injuries and the common practices of the time, he not only survived, not only did he not lose any limbs to amputation, but he would continue in the service, eventually becoming commander of Jackson's old Corps.
 
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