Fighting for Slavery?

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#21
We were talking about war aims, not motivation. The war aim of the Confederacy was independence.
The war aim was slavery.
Read again...
“I am convinced the institution of slavery is now virtually destroyed & with it we lose the great object for which the Confederacy was made, and without which there never would have been a Confederacy”
Lt. O. C. Orange 19th Texas Infantry

Kevin Dally
 

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Nathanb1

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#22
"The ground upon which i was laid was hard frozen, , the wind was coming from the north and I soon became very cold. . At about this time the army of the enemy came by in full retreat. As they passed me someone cursed and abused me other spoke kindly to me and one soldier said to me 'you will freeze here before morning' he pulled from his shoulders a pair of heavy blankets and placed them over me. I asked him his name 'My name is H.A. Bsarr My home is in Willow springs Nabraska. I dont blame you for fighting for the south . I am for the north because my home and family reside there. Good Bye and God Bles you'"
"Soon along came another soldier and said ' you weill freeze here here if not protected from ythat cold wind' and he began placing boxes of crackers and other army surpplies around me to protect me from the north wind."
"Others passed around , some threatening to bayonet me."
"And soon another came along ... and said 'this will never do you will freeze here' Gathering some kindling would he split some boxes and made a good fire at my feet and passed on.. To theses three men I no doubt owe my life." -
Col. Stephens 31st Mississippi Featherston's Brigade who was wounded at Franklin and was helped by several Federal soldiers as he layed on the ground while they retreated. He was not taken prisoner because the Federals did not have time to take anymore.
Two of my relatives were also in Featherston's Brigade (33rd Miss.) and were taken prisoner, to die at Camp Douglas--one in December and one in March. Another died there at Franklin. This is pretty hard to read, you know?
 
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#26
Is it proper to honor the confederate cause?
The cause? You would be better to learn from that mistake and not repeat it.
The soldier and people? I can study and marvel at his/their bravery, learn from their stamina towards hardship, and with amazement, look at what kind of country they helped rebuild!
There is honor in that!

Kevin Dally
 

jgoodguy

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#27
Red, we've been through his before. I'm not saying that slavery wasn't a cause for secession. Clearly, however, the national goal of the Confederacy was independence. They wanted to be free of the United States so slavery would not be threatened, but the goal was independence.
We were talking about war aims, not motivation. The war aim of the Confederacy was independence.
War is driven by politics. What was important enough to go to war? War does not happen in a vacuum, but is something to risk blood and treasure over. Independence is just a word. Independence is too vague, something must drive the impulse for independence-there must be a reason.

The war aim of the Confederacy was driven by the politics which were independence to be a slave republic.
 

AUG

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#29
Now direct the question to those Confederate leaders who launched the war and sent men like Pvt. Andrews off to fight. Why did they do it?
Many Southern generals, like Robert E. Lee for instance, were against secession and simply fought because they lived in the South. Lee was offered to fight for the Union but he refused because he could not oppose his home state of Virginia. This goes for many Confederate soldiers, from the private up to the general.
 
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#31
Tongue-in-cheek, Plutarch wrote that the common Roman foot soldier fought to protect the landed classes's right to keep him in debt. The disconnect between the goals of 19th century politicos vs those of the underfed reb couldn't be clearer. Those boys went because they were stirred up over the threat of some other fella coming down and taking his stuff and besides all his friends were going too. May be too simple for some, but the philosophers call it "Occam's Razor".
 

unionblue

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#34
"Slavery is no new thing. It has not only existed for ages in the world but it has existed, under every dispensation of the covenant of grace, in the Church of God." -- Minutes of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of America, vol. 1, 1861.

*Thornwell from South Carolina, was attempting to justify church support of slavery in this speech on December 4, 1861, to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of American, meeting in Augusta, Georgia.
 

CMWinkler

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#35
CMWinkler,

Why did the South seek independence in 1861?

Sincerely,
Unionblue
To preserve their property rights in slaves. But, again, Union,the original conversation was about war aims. The North sought to. Preserve the noon so the South could continue to be exploited. It's war aim, however, was to. Preserve the union.
 

unionblue

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#36
To preserve their property rights in slaves. But, again, Union,the original conversation was about war aims. The North sought to. Preserve the noon so the South could continue to be exploited. It's war aim, however, was to. Preserve the union.
CMWinkler,

Let me make sure I understand you, CMWinkler. The South sought independence to preserve their property rights in slaves. Do I understand you correctly when I believe you are saying the reason for the struggle for independence in the South was to preserve and protect slavery?

Sincerely,
Unionblue
 

unionblue

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#37
"The institution of slavery is doing more in the agency of the world's great progress, more for the improvement and comfort of human life, more for the preaching of the Gospel to heathen nations, more for the fulfillment of prophecy, than any other institution on earth." -- Florida Governor Richard K. Call, in a letter to John S. Littell, February 12, 1861.

*Littell, of Pennsylvania, became a US brigadier general.
 
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#39
The desire for independence was based on the desire to preserve slavery. The former was not necessary without the latter. The democratic process challenged slavery rights. That was the reason for the war.
 

unionblue

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#40
To preserve their property rights in slaves. But, again, Union,the original conversation was about war aims. The North sought to. Preserve the noon so the South could continue to be exploited. It's war aim, however, was to. Preserve the union.
The goal was independence. One of the things they sought to protect by independence was slavery. It really isn't that complex.
CMWinkler,

In my own view, the goal of independence does not happen, nor is it desired in a vacum.

The overwhelming desire to preserve, protect, and expand the institution of slavery was the primary goal of Southern independence. The war aim is to achieve independence with the driving, overall goal of preserving slavery.

Would you not agree?

Sincerely,
Unionblue
 



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