Fighting for Slavery?

Drew

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“I do not know why I wanted to go to war, but when I was 14 I begged my father to let me go, and he said, “No,” and I had to wait a whole year and was afraid the war would be over before I got there. I hardly knew what the war was about, as my father was a Union man and I was not taught to be a secessionist.”
Pvt. Redding Andrews, born in Fayette County, TX, January, 1848, enlisted in the Confederate Army at Shreveport, LA, July, 1863 as Private in Company D, Gen. Willis’ Battalion.
Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, Mamie Yeary, 1912, pp. 22
 

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Battalion

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“I do not know why I wanted to go to war, but when I was 14 I begged my father to let me go, and he said, “No,” and I had to wait a whole year and was afraid the war would be over before I got there. I hardly knew what the war was about, as my father was a Union man and I was not taught to be a secessionist.”
Pvt. Redding Andrews, born in Fayette County, TX, January, 1848, enlisted in the Confederate Army at Shreveport, LA, July, 1863 as Private in Company D, Gen. Willis’ Battalion.
Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, Mamie Yeary, 1912, pp. 22
S-l-a-v-e-r-y! I knew it was in there.
 

KeyserSoze

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“I do not know why I wanted to go to war, but when I was 14 I begged my father to let me go, and he said, “No,” and I had to wait a whole year and was afraid the war would be over before I got there. I hardly knew what the war was about, as my father was a Union man and I was not taught to be a secessionist.”
Pvt. Redding Andrews, born in Fayette County, TX, January, 1848, enlisted in the Confederate Army at Shreveport, LA, July, 1863 as Private in Company D, Gen. Willis’ Battalion.
Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, Mamie Yeary, 1912, pp. 22
Now direct the question to those Confederate leaders who launched the war and sent men like Pvt. Andrews off to fight. Why did they do it?
 
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Strawman thread. Perhaps Drew is unaware that individual motivations for going to war often don't align with the cause of the war. This has been widely acknowledged here.

The Southern electorate made it clear what they stood for and why they were willing to go to war and cheered it when it came. It was the heart of what made their culture Southern and was the Southern right that was of concern to them.
 

Drew

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Now direct the question to those Confederate leaders who launched the war and sent men like Pvt. Andrews off to fight. Why did they do it?
"Why, of course, the people don't want war. Why would some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best that he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece? Naturally, the common people don't want war; neither in Russia nor in England nor in America, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy or a fascist dictatorship or a Parliament or a Communist dictatorship.
Question: There is one difference. In a democracy, the people have some say in the matter through their elected representatives, and in the United States only Congress can declare wars.
Answer: Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

-Hermann Göring, April 18, 1946, to a reporter, while in a cell at Nuremburg, Germany, awaiting his death sentence.
 

CMWinkler

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Strawman thread. Perhaps Drew is unaware that individual motivations for going to war often don't align with the cause of the war. This has been widely acknowledged here.

The Southern electorate made it clear what they stood for and why they were willing to go to war and cheered it when it came. It was the heart of what made their culture Southern and was the Southern right that was of concern to them.
True. They were clear. They wanted independence to pursue their own way of life and dreams.
 
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True. They were clear. They wanted independence to pursue their own way of life and dreams.
Also known as slavery. This they made clear in their secession conventions, ordinances of secession, etc. It's puzzling why people want to dance around that now. Certainly at the time they had no trouble expressing why, inserting the word "slave" into their new constitution ten times and forbidding any limitations on slavery...one of several "states rights" surrendered.

The Confederate Constitution had been ratified on March 11, 1861 a month before the CSA started a war. So it is reasonable to believe that the majority supported it as opposed to the United States Constitution (under which they were still citizens.)
 

CMWinkler

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Also known as slavery. This they made clear in their secession conventions, ordinances of secession, etc. It's puzzling why people want to dance around that now. Certainly at the time they had no trouble expressing why, inserting the word "slave" into their new constitution ten times and forbidding any limitations on slavery...one of several "states rights" surrendered.

The Confederate Constitution had been ratified on March 11, 1861 a month before the CSA started a war. So it is reasonable to believe that the majority supported it as opposed to the United States Constitution (under which they were still citizens.)
Red, we've been through his before. I'm not saying that slavery wasn't a cause for secession. Clearly, however, the national goal of the Confederacy was independence. They wanted to be free of the United States so slavery would not be threatened, but the goal was independence.
 

AUG

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Depends on how you look at it. If they were fighting for the Confederacy then they were fighting for slavery as a whole, but that does not mean every soldier, as an individual, was fighting to preserve it personally. Many enlisted for other reasons and many others were conscripted against their will. Also, the personal reasons that initially drove them to enlist and what kept them fighting might have been for different reasons. At the outset of the war, patriotism, politics, peer pressure, etc. might have convinced them to go to war, but later on the bond they developed with their comrades and their unit might have also been one of the things that kept them going. Many did personally fight for slavery as well, but it should be stated that that was not the sole thing they were all fighting for as individuals.
 

AUG

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The ground upon which I was lying was hard and frozen, the wind was coming from the north and I soon became very cold. At about this time the army of the enemy came by in full retreat. As they passed me someone cursed and abused me, another spoke kindly to me and one soldier said to me "you will freeze here before morning" he pulled from his shoulders a pair of heavy blankets and placed them over me. I asked him his name "My name is H.A. Barr. My home is in Willow Springs, Nabraska. I don't blame you for fighting for the south. I am for the north because my home and family reside there. Good Bye and God Bless you." Soon along came another soldier and said "you will freeze here if not protected from that cold wind" and he began placing boxes of crackers and other army supplies around me to protect me from the north wind. Others passed around, some threatening to bayonet me. And soon another came along ... and said "this will never do, you will freeze here." Gathering some kindling would he split some boxes and made a good fire at my feet and passed on. To these three men I no doubt owe my life.
- Col. Marcus D. Lafayette Stephens, 31st Mississippi, Featherston's Brigade, who was wounded at Franklin and was helped by several Federal soldiers as he lay on the ground while they retreated. He was not taken prisoner because the Federals did not have time to take anymore.
 

Tin cup

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Their way of life was slavery of the black people.

"The highest ambition of all men in the south at that time, so far as occupation was concerned, was to be a planter, and to spend the most if not all his time on his plantation. For this, the merchant invested his profits, the lawyer his earnings, and indeed everybody saved all he could to attain to this ideal life. The planter living upon his own lands, surrounded by his slaves, a happy and childlike race in that day, dispensed a broad and generous hospitality; no one was ever turned from his door. For even the lowliest a place was found. His neighbors were everybody within a day's ride from his home, and frequent visits were made, the planter mounted on his splendid saddle horse, his favorite mode of travel, and his wife and children in the carriage. He was a proud man, proud of his wife and children, proud of his plantation and slaves, proud of his stainless honor, and ready to exact or give satisfaction for wrongs fancied or real, suffered or done, not by the deadly pistol concealed in the hip pocket, but by a meeting upon the field of honor, with mutual friends to see fair play. These were the halcyon days of the south, gone never to return, but the stories of those days, the sacred traditions, have preserved, and will, I hope, continue to preserve the same spirit in the descendants of those noble men, and keep them pure in race and upright and honorable. In this lies the hope of the south to-day. But what pen can do justice to southern society as it was before the war, its wide influence for good all over the land; mine cannot. I speak of a class and not of individuals, for there were rare exceptions who were coarse and rude, as there are to-day men who, forgetting the traditions of the past, destitute of gratitude and honor, flaunt themselves in high places, scheming only how best they may deceive the credulous and achieve their ends."
Frank Alexander Montgomery


Kevin Dally
 

Tin cup

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"The ground upon which i was laid was hard frozen, , the wind was coming from the north and I soon became very cold. . At about this time the army of the enemy came by in full retreat. As they passed me someone cursed and abused me other spoke kindly to me and one soldier said to me 'you will freeze here before morning' he pulled from his shoulders a pair of heavy blankets and placed them over me. I asked him his name 'My name is H.A. Bsarr My home is in Willow springs Nabraska. I dont blame you for fighting for the south . I am for the north because my home and family reside there. Good Bye and God Bles you'"
"Soon along came another soldier and said ' you weill freeze here here if not protected from ythat cold wind' and he began placing boxes of crackers and other army surpplies around me to protect me from the north wind."
"Others passed around , some threatening to bayonet me."
"And soon another came along ... and said 'this will never do you will freeze here' Gathering some kindling would he split some boxes and made a good fire at my feet and passed on.. To theses three men I no doubt owe my life." -
Col. Stephens 31st Mississippi Featherston's Brigade who was wounded at Franklin and was helped by several Federal soldiers as he layed on the ground while they retreated. He was not taken prisoner because the Federals did not have time to take anymore.
You look at the roster of the 31st Mississippi, and see the name Fife, they were relatives of my GGrandmother.
Thanks for posting the above!

Kevin Dally
 

trice

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Sigh.

So they "seceded" for "independence" and the only reason they wanted "independence" was to "protect slavery" and they went to war to establish their "independence" so they could "protect slavery" -- yet somehow the war wasn't about "slavery" and they weren't fighting because of "slavery".

I understand how much people from that mythical place "the South" want to believe this about their ancestors. It is a perfect example of arguing in circles to avoid the essential truth of a situation.

Tim
 

shanniereb

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Now direct the question to those Confederate leaders who launched the war and sent men like Pvt. Andrews off to fight. Why did they do it?
I agree with that assessment actually! Politicians have always been a dirty word to me! They sat and prospered off slave labor while sending men into battle to save THEIR necks, to that point I can agree.
 

Tin cup

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I agree with that assessment actually! Politicians have always been a dirty word to me! They sat and prospered off slave labor while sending men into battle to save THEIR necks, to that point I can agree.
I think you would find a lot in the ranks of the Southern Army who agree'd with those politicians.

"if slavery is to be abolished then I take no more interest in our fight."
Brig. Gen. Clement H. Stevens, AOT.

"...to fight forever, rather than submit to freeing negroes among us"
Captain Elias Davis of the 8th Alabama

" I mean that men who have not only been taught from their infancy that the institution of slavery was right; but men who actually owned and held slaves up to this time, --have now changed in their opinions regarding slavery, so as to be able to see the other side of the question, --to see that for man to have property in man was wrong, and that the “Declaration of Independence meant more than they had ever been able to see before. That all men are, and of right ought to be free”
Capt. Samuel T. Foster, Granbury's Texas Brigade after the surrender of the AoT. April 28, 1865


Kevin Dally
 

KeyserSoze

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Red, we've been through his before. I'm not saying that slavery wasn't a cause for secession. Clearly, however, the national goal of the Confederacy was independence. They wanted to be free of the United States so slavery would not be threatened, but the goal was independence.
That's ridiculous. You would have us believe that they wanted independence because it seemed like a good idea at the time. You ignore why they wanted to split off. The reason why was slavery.
 

CMWinkler

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That's ridiculous. You would have us believe that they wanted independence because it seemed like a good idea at the time. You ignore why they wanted to split off. The reason why was slavery.
We were talking about war aims, not motivation. The war aim of the Confederacy was independence.
 


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