★  Dwight, William Jr.

William Dwight Jr.

:us34stars:
Dwight.jpg


Born: July 14, 1831

Birthplace:
Springfield, Massachusetts

Father: William Dwight 1805 – 1880
(Buried: Forest Hills Cemetery and Crematory, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts)

Mother: Elizabeth Amelia White 1809 – 1883
(Buried: Forest Hills Cemetery and Crematory, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts)​

Wife: Anna Rodman Robinson 1837 – 1911

Children:

William Arthur Dwight 1867 –​

Education:

1849 – 1853: Attended West Point Military Academy​

Occupation before War:

Manufacturer in the City of Boston, Massachusetts​
Manufacturer in the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania​

Civil War Career:

1861: Captain in 70th New York Infantry Regiment​
1861: Lt. Colonel of 70th New York Infantry Regiment​
1861 – 1862: Colonel of 70th New York Infantry Regiment​
1862: Wounded and Captured at the Battle of Williamsburg, Virginia​
1862: Prisoner of War held by the Confederate Army​
1862: Exchanged in Prisoner of War Exchange on November 15th
1862 – 1866: Brigadier General of Union Army Volunteers​
1863: Brigade Commander in Siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana​
1864: Chief of Staff to Major General Nathaniel Banks
Dwight 1.jpg
1864: Served in the Battle of Mansfield, Louisiana​
1864: Served in the Battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana​
1864: Participated in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign​
1864: Served in the Third Battle of Winchester, Virginia​
1864: Served in the Battle of Fisher’s Hill, Virginia​
1866: Resigned as Brigadier General in the Union Army in January​

Occupation after War:

Manufacturing Businessman in Cincinnati, Ohio​

Died: April 21, 1888

Place of Death:
Boston, Massachusetts

Cause of Death: Cirrhosis of liver

Age at time of Death: 56 years old

Burial Place: Forest Hills Cemetery and Crematory, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts
 
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Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
He didn't actually graduate from West Point, he was discharged in 1853 for bad grades.He did however get a second chance and was appointed second- in- command of a regiment that would become part of Dan Sickle's Excelsior Brigade.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
He was not only wounded at Williamsburg but wounded three times and left on the field and presumed dead. It was on the staff of General Banks that there were suspiions and charges of speculation over seized Confederate cotton. He was then transferred back to Virginia, this time in the Shenandoah Valley. It states in Stewart Sifakis' book that Dwight spent some time under arrest on charges that he "sought a safe position for his battle-time lunch". Does anyone know exactly what that last sentence means?
 

NedBaldwin

Major
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Location
California
He was not only wounded at Williamsburg but wounded three times and left on the field and presumed dead. It was on the staff of General Banks that there were suspiions and charges of speculation over seized Confederate cotton. He was then transferred back to Virginia, this time in the Shenandoah Valley. It states in Stewart Sifakis' book that Dwight spent some time under arrest on charges that he "sought a safe position for his battle-time lunch". Does anyone know exactly what that last sentence means?
At 3rd Winchester, the 19th Corps consisted of two divisions commanded by Grover and Dwight. After the battle, the Corps commander (Emory) arrested Dwight and charged him with neglect of duty for being absent from his command during battle. Apparently he and some of his staff had gone back in the woods for a picnic
 

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