{⋆★⋆} GEN Bragg, Braxton

Braxton Bragg

General Bragg 1.jpg
:CSA1stNat: Braxton Bragg
was a career army officer during the Second Seminole War and Mexican–American War. At the outbreak of the War Between the States, he became a member of the Confederate States Army and was assigned to duty at Richmond, under direction of the President Jefferson Davis. He took charge of the conduct of military operations of the armies of the Confederate States from February 24, 1864, until January 13, 1865, when he was charged with command and defense of Wilmington, North Carolina. He previously had command of an army in the Western Theater.

Born: March 22, 1817

Birthplace: Warrenton, North Carolina

Father: Thomas Bragg Sr. 1777 – 1863
(Buried: Howard Street Family Cemetery, Ocracoke, North Carolina​

Mother: Margaret Crossland 1784 – 1834
(Buried: Old Warrenton Cemetery, Warren Co., North Carolina)​

Wife: Eliza Brooks Ellis 1825 – 1908 (June 7, 1849)
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery, Mobile, Alabama)​

Married: June 7, 1849 in Louisiana

Children: None

Education:

1837: Graduated from West Point Military Academy (5th in class)​

Occupation:

1837 – 1838: 2nd Lt. United States Army, 3rd Artillery​
1838 – 1846: 1st Lt. United States Army, 3rd Artillery​
1846 – 1856: Captain United States Army, 3rd Artillery​
General Bragg before War.jpg
1855:
Offered Major of United States Army, 1st Cavalry but declined​
1856: Resigned from United States Army on January 3rd
1856 – 1861: Sugar Plantation Owner in Thibodaux, Louisiana​
1860 – 1861: Member of Louisiana State Board of Public Works​

Civil War Career:

1861: Colonel of Louisiana State Militia​
1861: Major General of Louisiana State Militia​
1861: Commander of the Department of Louisiana​
1861: Brigadier General in the Confederate Army Infantry​
1861: Commanding General of Pensacola, Florida​
1861 – 1862: Major General in the Confederate Army Infantry​
General Bragg.jpg
1862:
Commanding General of Army of the Mississippi​
1862: Commanding General 2nd Army Corps Army of the Mississippi​
1862 – 1865: General of Confederate Army Infantry​
1862 – 1863: Commanding General Department of the Mississippi​
1862 – 1863: Commanding General Army of Tennessee​
1863: Commanding General Department of Tennessee​
1864: Military Advisor to President Jefferson Davis​
1864 – 1865: Commanding General Department of North Carolina​
1865: Surrendered at Durham Station, Durham, North Carolina​

Occupation after War:
Superintendent of New Orleans, Louisiana, Waterworks​
Insurance Agent for Carolina Life Insurance Company​
General Braxton Bragg.JPG
Civilian Engineer for the city of Mobile, Alabama​
Chief Engineer of Gulf, Colorado, & Santa Fe Railroad Company​
Texas State Inspector of Railroads​

Died: September 27, 1876

Place of Death: Galveston, Texas

Cause of Death: Degeneration of Cerebral Blood Vessels

Age at time of Death: 59 years old

Burial Place: Magnolia Cemetery, Mobile, Alabama
 
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Pete Longstreet

First Sergeant
Joined
Mar 3, 2020
Location
Hartford, CT
Probably one of the most disliked Confederate Generals. His subordinate generals all wrote to him stating the army had lost confidence in his ability to lead. But Bragg had a close relationship with Jefferson Davis, which helped keep him at the head of the western theater. He was also known for executing his soldiers for desertion and other crimes... although I believe Joe Johnston executed more soldiers than Bragg during the war.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Does anybody know any stories about Bragg's 'nice.' even 'likable' side? There must be something somebody liked about him, sometime!
Jefferson Davis seemed to like him for some reason, maybe it was through his brother Thomas Bragg the Attorney General. About the only nice thing I can think about him is that he settled in Texas After the war.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
40+ years after the war there was a govenor of Alabama, Braxton Bragg Comer.This guy was born before the war,in 1848 I believe. What was the connection? I'm guessing that possibly the father of the govenor and Bragg knew each other in the Mexican War.
 

uaskme

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
SE Tennessee
He had his supporters. Fighting Joe Wheeler, Jeff Davis was a strong supporter. Most of the Lower South Troops. There was Sectionalism in the AOT. Elsie, Bragg’s wife warned him when he came up from Pensacola and to Shiloh, not to trust the TN Troops. To put them up front. By the time they got to Missionary Ridge, Bragg made the determination that the Tennesseans shouldn’t be the majority of a Division or Brigade. So he broke them up. Cheatham, a Tennessean‘s Division was scattered. Put under command of Generals Loyal to Bragg. Patton Anderson was one. But he did have support, Jeff Davis, especially. Hood also sucked up to him. One reason Hood replaced Johnson.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
He had his supporters. Fighting Joe Wheeler, Jeff Davis was a strong supporter. Most of the Lower South Troops. There was Sectionalism in the AOT. Elsie, Bragg’s wife warned him when he came up from Pensacola and to Shiloh, not to trust the TN Troops. To put them up front. By the time they got to Missionary Ridge, Bragg made the determination that the Tennesseans shouldn’t be the majority of a Division or Brigade. So he broke them up. Cheatham, a Tennessean‘s Division was scattered. Put under command of Generals Loyal to Bragg. Patton Anderson was one. But he did have support, Jeff Davis, especially.
That...that explains why the OoB for that campaign was so...nonsensical.
 

uaskme

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
SE Tennessee
That...that explains why the OoB for that campaign was so...nonsensical.

Morale was low during the Siege at Chattanooga. Confederates were in as bad, really worse shape than the Federals. Bragg used this time to punish his detractors. TN Troops had been with Cheatham since the beginning of the War. Patton Anderson was one of the first to Break at Missionary Ridge. A lot of the Low Morale Tennesseans were there. Cheatham had been absent, he returned the evening before the Assault. He was actually north on the ridge, close to Hardee. Morale problems had a lot to do with Missionary Ridge. Other Problems, no doubt.

Hardee despised Bragg. Most of it due to the KY Campaign. He leaves at Tullahoma, goes to organize the Vicksburg Paroles. He is absent at Chickamauga. Hardee is the best Corps Commander the AOT had. He was the most qualified to do the job. However he was replace by Hill, who came from the ANV. Hill was a disaster. Hardee comes back and replaces Polk at Chattanooga.

So, personal problems had a lot to do with the AOT’s demise.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Morale was low during the Siege at Chattanooga. Confederates were in as bad, really worse shape than the Federals. Bragg used this time to punish his detractors. TN Troops had been with Cheatham since the beginning of the War. Patton Anderson was one of the first to Break at Missionary Ridge. A lot of the Low Morale Tennesseans were there. Cheatham had been absent, he returned the evening before the Assault. He was actually north on the ridge, close to Hardee. Morale problems had a lot to do with Missionary Ridge. Other Problems, no doubt.

Hardee despised Bragg. Most of it due to the KY Campaign. He leaves at Tullahoma, goes to organize the Vicksburg Paroles. He is absent at Chickamauga. Hardee is the best Corps Commander the AOT had. He was the most qualified to do the job. However he was replace by Hill, who came from the ANV. Hill was a disaster. Hardee comes back and replaces Polk at Chattanooga.

So, personal problems had a lot to do with the AOT’s demise.
Hardee was an overall mediocre commander, from what I could see. I think his "Old Reliable" nickname fits him perfectly. I point this out to say, if he's the best Corps commander of the AoT, its no wonder why the AoT failed time after time.
 
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