{⋆★⋆} BG Beall, William Nelson Rector

William Nelson Rector Beall

Born: March 20, 1825
General Beall.jpg


Birth Place: Bardstown, Kentucky

Father: Samuel T. Beall 1791 – 1840
(Buried: Mount Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Arkansas)​

Mother: Sally Rector Unknown – 1840
(Buried: Mount Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Arkansas)​

Wife: Felicia Eakins Bass 1845 – 1904
(Buried: Mount Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tennessee)​

Children:

William Abadie Beall 1870 – 1921​
(Buried: Mount Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tennessee)​
John Bass Beall 1874 – 1939​
(Buried: Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri)​

Education:

1848: Graduated from West Point Military Academy (30th in his class)​

Occupation before War:

1848 – 1849: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, 4th Infantry Regiment
General Beall 2.jpg
1849 – 1855: 2nd Lt. United States Army, 5th Infantry Regiment​
1855: 1st Lt. United States Army, 1st Cavalry Regiment​
1855 – 1861: Captain, United States Army, 1st Cavalry Regiment​
1861: Resigned from United States Army, August 20, 1861​

Civil War Career:

1861 – 1862: Captain of Cavalry in the Trans Mississippi Department

1862 – 1865: Brigadier General of Confederate Army, Cavalry

1863: Captured during the Siege of Port Hudson

1863 – 1864: Prisoner of War held by the Union Army, Johnson's Island

1864: Confederate Agent for the supplying Confederate Prisoners

1864: Paroled by the Union Army to perform his duties as Supply officer
IMG_8497.JPG


1864 – 1865: Cotton Broker in New York City proceeds went to supplies

Occupation after War:

1865 – 1883: General Commission Merchant in Saint Louis, Missouri

Died: July 25, 1883

Place of Death: McMinnville, Tennessee

Cause of Death: Not Known

Age at time of Death: 58 years old

Burial Place: Mount Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tennessee

IMG_8508.JPG
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Polloco

Major
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
I'm not really sure how this "supply agent" arrangement worked but through his office in New York City He got blankets for the prisoners in exchange for Southern Cotton.
 
Top