{⋆★⋆} BG ARTY Alexander, Edward Porter

Edward Porter Alexander

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Edward Porter Alexander was a military engineer, railroad executive, planter, and author. He served first as an officer in the United States Army and later, in the Confederate Army, rising to the rank of brigadier general.

Born: May 26, 1835

Birthplace: Washington, Georgia

Father: Adam Leopold Alexander Sr. 1803 – 1882
(Buried: Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Georgia)​

Mother: Sarah Hillhouse Gilbert 1805 – 1855
(Buried: Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah, Georgia)​

1st​ Wife: Betty Jacqueline Mason 1836 – 1890
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery, Augusta, Georgia)​

Married: April 3, 1860 in King George County, Virginia

2nd​ Wife: Mary Landon Mason 1861 – 1946
(Buried: Rose Hill Cemetery, Hagerstown, Maryland)​

Married: October 1, 1901 in Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia

Children:

Bessie Mason Alexander Ficklen 1861 – 1945​
(Buried: Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah, Georgia)​
Edward Porter Alexander II 1863 – 1930​
Lucy Roy Alexander 1863 – 1900​
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery, Augusta, Georgia)​
Adam Leopold Alexander 1867 – 1911​
(Buried: Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah, Georgia)​
William Mason Alexander 1868 – 1936​
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery, Augusta, Georgia)​

Signature:
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E. P. Alexander Cadet.jpg


Education:

1857: Graduated from West Point Military Academy (3rd​ in class)​

Occupation:

1857 – 1858: Brevet 2nd​ Lt. United States Army Corps of Engineers​
1858 – 1861: 2nd​ Lt. United States Army Corps of Engineers​
1858 – 1859: Assistant Instructor at West Point Military Academy​
1859: Instructor of Small Arms at West Point Military Academy​
1860: Assistant Instructor at West Point Military Academy​
1860: Member of Board for trial of Small Arms​
1861: Assistant Engineer Defense Construction at Alcatraz Island​
1861: Resigned from United States Army on May 1, 1861​

Civil War Career:
1861: Captain in the Confederate Army Engineers​
1861: Chief Engineer & Signal Officer to General Beauregard​
1861: Participated in the First Battle of Bull Run​
1861 – 1862: Lt. Colonel of Confederate Army Artillery Staff officer​
1861 – 1862: Chief of Ordnance to General Joseph E. Johnston​
1862: Participated in the Peninsula Campaign as Ordnance Officer​
1862: Participated in the Seven Days Campaign as Ordnance Officer​
1862 – 1864: Colonel of Confederate Army Artillery
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1862: Participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia (Artillery)​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia (Artillery)​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania​
1863: Arrived too late to participate in the Battle of Chickamuga​
1863 – 1864: Chief of Artillery for Department of East Tennessee​
1864: Participated in the Overland Campaign​
1864 – 1865: Brigadier General of Confederate Army Cavalry​
1864 – 1865: Participated in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia​
1865: Proposed to General Lee to fight war in guerrilla war style​
1865: Participated in the Appomattox Virginia Campaign​
1865: Surrendered at Appomattox Court House Appomattox, Virginia​

Occupation after War:

1866 – 1869: Mathematics Professor at University of South Carolina​
1869 – 1871: President of Columbia Oil Company​
1870 – 1872: Actuary of Policy Holders Carolina life Insurance Co.​
1871 – 1872: Superintendent Charlotte, Columbia, Augusta Railroad​
1872 – 1875: President of Savannah and Memphis Railroad Co.​
1875 – 1878: President & General Manager Western Railroad of Ala.​
1878 – 1880: President of Georgia Railroad and Banking Company​
1880 – 1882: Vice President Louisville and Nashville Railroad Co.
General Alexander after war.jpg
1883 – 1888: Georgia State Capitol Commissioner​
President of Central Railroad and Banking Company of Georgia​
1892 – 1893: Engineers Committee to Columbia River Navigation​
1893 – 1894: Engineers Committee Chesapeake and Delaware​
Duck Hunted with President Grover Cleveland​

Died: April 28, 1910

Place of Death: Savannah, Georgia

Cause of Death: Arteriosclerosis, coma, stroke

Age at time of Death: 74 years old

Burial Place: Magnolia Cemetery, Savannah, Georgia

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John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
He was also involved with signals, new weapons, engineering, reconnaissance, supply, training and the secret service. He witnessed the battle of Gaine's Mill from a balloon. All of that in addition to being the most capable artillerist in the Army of Northern Virginia.
With the artillery he had compared to that of the Union.One of his major faults was at Gettysburg.IF he had the artillery and cannib balls that the Yanks had would the duel of connons been with a different outcome ? For the Artilliarist .
 

DaveBrt

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Location
Charlotte, NC
With the artillery he had compared to that of the Union.One of his major faults was at Gettysburg.IF he had the artillery and cannib balls that the Yanks had would the duel of connons been with a different outcome ? For the Artilliarist .
Better fuzes would have helped. But I believe his main problem was in not massing his fire on the main target, but spreading it out to shoot at too many targets to get significant effect on any of them. Of course, the Union Artillery Reserve would have been able to replace any damage he did in fact cause.
 

John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Better fuzes would have helped. But I believe his main problem was in not massing his fire on the main target, but spreading it out to shoot at too many targets to get significant effect on any of them. Of course, the Union Artillery Reserve would have been able to replace any damage he did in fact cause.
Does artillerist first fire for effect before firing directly on his target to obtain maximum effect? Did Lee have a mounted artillery that could bring cartillery closer or to fire on targets that the big guns may over shot.I think that the cavalry did have that size of cannon.Quick fire and OUT.
 

Polloco

Major
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
He spent 2 years in Nicaragua from May 1997 to October 1899. President Cleveland appointed Him to head a commission to help fix the boundary between Nicaragua and Costa Rica. And the possibility of a canal across Central America was also a consideration of that commission. This commission was headquartered in Greytown (now San Juan de Nicaragua). It was during this trip to Nicaragua that his wife Bettie became ill and died shortly after his return. His wife died on November 20, 1899. In October 1901 Alexander married Mary Mason, his first wife's niece.
 

War Horse

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Quartermaster Gettysburg 2017
Joined
Sep 4, 2014
Location
Lexington, SC
Edward Porter Alexander was the most capable artillerist in the Confederate army. His devotion included an unequaled study of the battlefield, expert placement of his guns and an ability to place his guns with exhausting effort in the locations where they would inflect the most damage to the enemy. He doesn’t get enough credit in my opinion. While some may disagree his efforts at Gettysburg gave an ill fated assault its best chance for success. Under supplied, faulty fuses and all.
 

John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Edward Porter Alexander was the most capable artillerist in the Confederate army. His devotion included an unequaled study of the battlefield, expert placement of his guns and an ability to place his guns with exhausting effort in the locations where they would inflect the most damage to the enemy. He doesn’t get enough credit in my opinion. While some may disagree his efforts at Gettysburg gave an ill fated assault its best chance for success. Under supplied, faulty fuses and all.
There is a inquiry as to Gettysburg that I would like some answer to. If Alexander had knowledge of the fuses and the shells ,being responsible for artillery , could he have moved the artillery into a more favorable area for more accurate fire onto the Union fortification. Did he inform Longstreet prior to Pickett -Armistead charge? The Charge reminds me of the Charge of the Light Brigade but without the horses .
 

War Horse

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Quartermaster Gettysburg 2017
Joined
Sep 4, 2014
Location
Lexington, SC
There is a inquiry as to Gettysburg that I would like some answer to. If Alexander had knowledge of the fuses and the shells ,being responsible for artillery , could he have moved the artillery into a more favorable area for more accurate fire onto the Union fortification. Did he inform Longstreet prior to Pickett -Armistead charge? The Charge reminds me of the Charge of the Light Brigade but without the horses .
He had no idea the fuses were different than those he was accustomed to using. They were purchased from a different supplier. Once the cannonaide began it was to late.
 
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