Replacement parts

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GPW1942

Cadet
Joined
Oct 8, 2019
Messages
12
Hi All,
New here.
Was just rummaging through an old junk store and found two, what my friend tells me are old civil war firearms.
One says 1815 Harpers Ferry. It's a flint lock musket.
The other looks like 1857 Smith's. Friend says its a Smiths carbine breach loading percussion cap. This one is missing the saddle ring and bar and the hammer does not go all the way down when the trigger is pulled.

Are there original parts out there anywhere? I would like to get a bar and ring. I found Taylor's on line, but assume they are reproductions.
Also could use some advice on the hammer issue.
Thank you in advance.
Dj
 

GPW1942

Cadet
Joined
Oct 8, 2019
Messages
12
Hi Larry
Thanx.
Any experience in getting an old projectile out of a musket? I tried using compressed air but no go. It is in there tight. Just put some PB blaster down the barrel. none made it to the touch hole.
 
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johan_steele

Regimental Armorer
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
14,948
Location
South of the North 40
Hi All,
New here.
Was just rummaging through an old junk store and found two, what my friend tells me are old civil war firearms.
One says 1815 Harpers Ferry. It's a flint lock musket.
The other looks like 1857 Smith's. Friend says its a Smiths carbine breach loading percussion cap. This one is missing the saddle ring and bar and the hammer does not go all the way down when the trigger is pulled.

Are there original parts out there anywhere? I would like to get a bar and ring. I found Taylor's on line, but assume they are reproductions.
Also could use some advice on the hammer issue.
Thank you in advance.
Dj
Lodgewood in Whitewater, Wi is always my first suggestion for original parts followed by S&S firearms. Repro parts are unlikely to fit an original due to some dimension differences. A picture or six might be advisable to better help with suggestions.

The Smith issue could be a variety of things to include binding in the lock mortise a broken or damaged mainspring etc.
 
Last edited:
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rob63

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Messages
745
Location
Indiana
Hi Larry
Thanx.
Any experience in getting an old projectile out of a musket? I tried using compressed air but no go. It is in there tight. Just put some PB blaster down the barrel. none made it to the touch hole.
I have had quite a few muskets with something down deep in the barrel clogging it up, and not one has ever actually proved to be a projectile. Insect nests being the most common, dirt, rust, paper, and rags next. My favorite was one that was jam packed almost to the muzzle with chewing gum wrappers, hundreds of them!

I have found a patch pulling worm like this to be most effective. If you actually have a projectile then you will likely need a bullet puller, which are also useful on breaking up dirt, etc. Fouling scrapers are often helpful as well. You will also need a lot of patience! It usually comes out in dribs and drabs.

12-32-10-n.jpg
 
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GPW1942

Cadet
Joined
Oct 8, 2019
Messages
12
I have had quite a few muskets with something down deep in the barrel clogging it up, and not one has ever actually proved to be a projectile. Insect nests being the most common, dirt, rust, paper, and rags next. My favorite was one that was jam packed almost to the muzzle with chewing gum wrappers, hundreds of them!

I have found a patch pulling worm like this to be most effective. If you actually have a projectile then you will likely need a bullet puller, which are also useful on breaking up dirt, etc. Fouling scrapers are often helpful as well. You will also need a lot of patience! It usually comes out in dribs and drabs.

View attachment 328719
 

GPW1942

Cadet
Joined
Oct 8, 2019
Messages
12
Hi All,
Thank you for the greetings. Spent my younger years in Cleveland Heights OH.
Always have problems sending files to my computer. Here is what I found. Rod had a nice thud when I dropped it in. Sprayed a fare amount of PB blaster down the barrel. Nothing came out of the touch hole as of last night. Did not check it yet this morning.

IMG_4868.jpg


IMG_4867.jpg


IMG_4864.jpg


IMG_4865.jpg
 
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Peter Stines

Private
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
195
Location
Gulf Coast of Texas
Yes, I know this is an old song but it's worth repeating: Before you go prodding around with a tool in a potentially LOADED muzzleloader, ALWAYS DEACTIVATE ANY POWDER THAT MAY STILL BE IN THE BARREL. That old black powder can STILL ignite! I used KROIL penetrating oil from S&S. It takes time to penetrate and soak (but an autopsy and embalming take time too and you may need these services if you accidentally ignite any old powder) Sometimes the obstruction is a rock, marble, mud, sticks, little toys, etc. put there by kids (or even adults) playing with the gun. A bullet puller probably won't penetrate a rock or marble.The patch worm shown in an earlier posting is NOT a good choice for pulling a potential ball. It's unlikely that the pig tail won't penetrate a ball deep enough to pull it out. A proper ball puller looks like a wood screw. The better ones have a "collar" to help align the screw with the ball and prevent gouging the barrel. These can be had from Dixie, Track of the Wolf, S&S et al. If it turns out to be anything but powder and ball gunsmith may need to unscrew the breech plug and remove the obstruction. The cork-screw style worm is best used for cleaning and oiling with patches or flax. It's also handy for snagging wads used in a m/l shotgun.
I suspect that the flinter is a re-conversion. Notice the different color of the cock compared to the lock plate. Modern castings often don't quite match because of the different metal. If the frizzen face is smooth with no strike marks it may too be a modern casting. Check the top jaw screw thread and see if they are metric or American standard pitch. A thread gauge will tell the tale. If it IS original flint, you have something! :dance:
 

GPW1942

Cadet
Joined
Oct 8, 2019
Messages
12
Yes, I know this is an old song but it's worth repeating: Before you go prodding around with a tool in a potentially LOADED muzzleloader, ALWAYS DEACTIVATE ANY POWDER THAT MAY STILL BE IN THE BARREL. That old black powder can STILL ignite! I used KROIL penetrating oil from S&S. It takes time to penetrate and soak (but an autopsy and embalming take time too and you may need these services if you accidentally ignite any old powder) Sometimes the obstruction is a rock, marble, mud, sticks, little toys, etc. put there by kids (or even adults) playing with the gun. A bullet puller probably won't penetrate a rock or marble.The patch worm shown in an earlier posting is NOT a good choice for pulling a potential ball. It's unlikely that the pig tail won't penetrate a ball deep enough to pull it out. A proper ball puller looks like a wood screw. The better ones have a "collar" to help align the screw with the ball and prevent gouging the barrel. These can be had from Dixie, Track of the Wolf, S&S et al. If it turns out to be anything but powder and ball gunsmith may need to unscrew the breech plug and remove the obstruction. The cork-screw style worm is best used for cleaning and oiling with patches or flax. It's also handy for snagging wads used in a m/l shotgun.
I suspect that the flinter is a re-conversion. Notice the different color of the cock compared to the lock plate. Modern castings often don't quite match because of the different metal. If the frizzen face is smooth with no strike marks it may too be a modern casting. Check the top jaw screw thread and see if they are metric or American standard pitch. A thread gauge will tell the tale. If it IS original flint, you have something! :dance:
Hi peter,
Good advice on the powder. I already have ir soaking in PB blaster, will that do the job?
What do you mean by a re-conversion?
Are you saying to check the threads on the screw that tightens the jaw on the flint?
I was hoping to get the ball (obstruction) out with out damaging it. Looks like that's not an option.
Thanx
Dj
 
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Package4

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Messages
3,298
Hi peter,
Good advice on the powder. I already have ir soaking in PB blaster, will that do the job?
What do you mean by a re-conversion?
Are you saying to check the threads on the screw that tightens the jaw on the flint?
I was hoping to get the ball (obstruction) out with out damaging it. Looks like that's not an option.
Thanx
Dj
The hammer does not match the piece, indicating that it could be a reconversion, this means that the piece was converted to percussion and then reconverted to Flint at a later date for collector value.
 

GPW1942

Cadet
Joined
Oct 8, 2019
Messages
12
So the threads on the Harpers Ferry do not match any gauges I have. It falls in between 20 and 24 standard and 1 and 1.25 metric. There is a B stamped on the back and an R S stamped on the top piece.
 
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