Real or Faux? Real bill? Old reproduction?

3rdTennCo.C

Private
Joined
Oct 9, 2018
Picked this up today, seems like its real but I know there's been PLENTY of counterfeits and repo's
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It appears to be an authentic issued Confederate note commonly known to collectors as the "T-41, slaves hoeing cotton" note. I can't make out the serial number -- possibly 44783-- but $100 notes issued on November 6, 1862 bearing plate letter Z would have a serial number between 44301 and 47500. The two signatures are correct for that plate letter Z and the date... W.L. Harvey "For Treasurer" and G. Johnston "For Register" that have been handsigned in the correct period brown ink. The iron oxide used in brown ink has over the years burned through the paper, which is very common. The condition of the note to a collector would be on the lower end of the grading scale and would be considered "about good" or "good" which has an entirely different meaning in numismatics than in everyday usage when we describe a car or item in "good condition." T-41 notes in comparable condition have been recently selling of fleabay for under $40.
 
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Frederick14Va

Sergeant Major
Joined
Oct 14, 2013
Location
Virginia
I concur with @Copperhead-mi assessment. Its authentic. These were also interest bearing notes at two cents per day. Occasionally will find one of these with an ink stamp in the back indication that the interest had been redeemed and paid on a given date. This one had not been...

Just to have a bit of fun and curiosity on the interest on it... IF things had turned out differently and this note was still valid.. its redemption value with the interest as of today would be (57284 days at .02 interest per day + $100 face value) = $1245.68.
 
it looks real to me, the ink that was used to sign and number etc has turned brown that is due to the iron that is used in the ink.

The original color of the ink was brown-black that appeared as a brown. The iron used in the gall ink oxidizes and is what causes the eventual years later "burning" through the signatures. One of the first dead giveaways that determines a fake Confederate note or bond is a signature in black ink.
 
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Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
In addition to where the bill was stamped , the type of stamp can also determine its worth to a collector. I have read about a Army or Navy stamp but I really don't know exactly is meant by that.Maybe some of the more serious collectors can enlighten us.
 

3rdTennCo.C

Private
Joined
Oct 9, 2018
In addition to my $100.00 bill being stamped interest paid in Macon (1864), it also is stamped that interest was paid in Columbus, Georgia (1865). How was interest paid twice?
Could someone else have received possession of it, deposited it and accumulated their own interest?
 

byron ed

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Location
Midwest
Did you maybe use a "sharpen" or "auto-adjust" function on the image of this bill? The slight glow around some of the letter edges makes it harder to assess. For purposes like this, the raw image (the original image file from the camera) would be better, even if not as pleasing to eye because of appearing off-color. The problem is indoor light sources, which are not reliably consistent.

Going forward, if you have an automatic camera take the shot outside in cloudy bright conditions. That's more reliable for cases like this bill where color shades matter. Better yet, if the camera has a "cloudy" or "cloudy bright" setting, or a "set white balance" function, employ those.

I apologize for the overkill in this response, but I feel that if others here will be submitting images of money etc. this could actually be helpful information.
 

Frederick14Va

Sergeant Major
Joined
Oct 14, 2013
Location
Virginia
In addition to my $100.00 bill being stamped interest paid in Macon (1864), it also is stamped that interest was paid in Columbus, Georgia (1865). How was interest paid twice?

Most retained possession of the original note. Interest thereof was redeemable and continued to accrue, usually payable once or twice a year depending on the note in question. The 1864 stamp would indicate the interest was paid from issue up until 1864... The second stamp indicates interest was paid for 1864 to 65 period.
 
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Frederick14Va

Sergeant Major
Joined
Oct 14, 2013
Location
Virginia
Could someone else have received possession of it, deposited it and accumulated their own interest?

Yes, the note was payable to bearer. meaning whomever had physical possession of the note could redeem the interest thereof.
These were legal tender and used to buy stuff.. But also could be saved and waited to collect the annual interest.

Side Note; These earlier interest bearing notes tended to survive better than many other issues did that were not. Earlier issues of 61 & 62 many of which were one sided and easily counterfeited. Latter issues were higher quality, double sided, and less able to be replicated so easy. In order to counter that problem further the earlier issues were to be turned in, in exchange for the newer printed ones to remove the old from circulation. After a given date the older currency would begin to be devalued in their respective face value exchange rate, hence served to further prod people to turn them in for exchange quicker. This is also why there are generally lesser of the early issues surviving than the latter ones.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
I somehow got the impression that interest was to be paid at major cities. Apparently this wasn't the case, and I may be wrong on this, but were Macon and Columbus Georgia considered "Major"? Also who took care of the actual paying of interest? Would that be a Bank or the Post Office?
 

Frederick14Va

Sergeant Major
Joined
Oct 14, 2013
Location
Virginia
Bringing up the point of one-sided confederate notes being easier to counterfeit, and referring to all issues of paper money from 1861-1865 north and south; how often does an 'original counterfeit note' appear on the market, and what value do they bring compared to 'real money'?

Period counterfeits are indeed out there, and have increased as collecables over the years. In some cases the counterfeits are worth more than the original notes.
 
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