Real or Faux? Real bill? Old reproduction?

I have heard thast about some counterfeits. The "girl on a deer", Upham note, note is a good example.

The best known counterfeiter of Confederate notes during the War was Samuel Upham, a Philadelphia businessman who started out by producing stationary depicting Jefferson Davis's head resembling a jackass. The success of that venture led him to producing counterfeit notes and CSA postage stamps in early 1862 which he sold for 5 cents each or $15 per 1000. Upham's earliest notes had his name and address on the very bottom edge of the notes. Upham soon found out that a number of people were cutting off the name and address on his notes and that they were being used in the South to buy cotton. He felt he ought to share in some of the profits so in late 1862, Upham began printing the notes without his name and address and raised the price of his notes. Towards the end of the War when Confederate currency was practically worthless, Upham was offering $20,000 in counterfeit CSA notes for only $5. Years after the war ended, Upham claimed that he had printed 1,564,000 bogus notes between 1862 and 1863. He also boasted that Jefferson Davis had offered a reward in gold for his body, dead or alive. As mentioned by @Frederick14Va , many of his contemporary counterfeit notes are worth as much or more than their real counterparts.
 
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Sep 15, 2018
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By the glare in the very first photo I see that a clear plastic protective sleeve is being used. I too keep my meager collection of bills in these protectors. Is this the proper way to keep old currency? Or does it need to "breathe"?
 
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3rdTennCo.C

Private
Joined
Oct 9, 2018
By the glare in the very first photo I see that a clear plastic protective sleeve is being used. I too keep my meager collection of bills in these protectors. Is this the proper way to keep old currency? Or does it need to "breathe"?
I'm not sure but I see no harm. I mean I guess it slows some oxidizing of it with limited air exposure, besides, the rice paper that was used is uber fragile nowadays lol
 

Frederick14Va

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Oct 14, 2013
Location
Virginia
By the glare in the very first photo I see that a clear plastic protective sleeve is being used. I too keep my meager collection of bills in these protectors. Is this the proper way to keep old currency? Or does it need to "breathe"?

The Mylar plastic sleeve protectors are what most folks today use. Helps to keep dust, dirt and oils from handling from doing any further damage. Its what I also use. I have around 400+ period currency notes and treasury bonds of the era.
 
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Location
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I agree they seem to do a great job of protecting. But could you address the "breathing" of the notes. I'd be tickled pink if I never had to actually touch the bills to take them out of the protector once on a while.
 
I'm not sure but I see no harm. I mean I guess it slows some oxidizing of it with limited air exposure, besides, the rice paper that was used is uber fragile nowadays lol

Confederate currency was mostly printed on paper made from linen and rags. Some of the notes were printed on finer quality paper imported from England and those notes generally will have a watermark of the mill in the paper that can be seen when held up to a light. These notes usually command a higher price than the non-imported paper version of the same note.
 
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Sep 15, 2018
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One of the desireables is the watermark Hodgkinson & Co. Wookey Hole Mill on the backs of some notes . This should command a higher price as it was imported through the blockade. Smuggled in actually. Wookey Hole Mill was located near Somerset, England. So if you happen to have a note or two with this watermark you got a piece of history in your hands.
 
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I'd like to have some of my notes framed and put on display.Along with some Erlanger Bonds. But wouldn't they fade being out in the light. They say some shadowboxs come equipped with a glass pane that blocks ultraviolet rays. Are there other forms of light that could be harmful to the old ink?
 

Frederick14Va

Sergeant Major
Joined
Oct 14, 2013
Location
Virginia
The respective note placed inside an archive quality mylar sleeve holder inside the frame they normally will do fine. Never place the paper item directly against or touching the glass, also only use acid free backing, holders or frame matting. Also remember to place it where it will avoid any direct sunlight.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Artificial light from fluorescents or regular bulbs won't do any harm? If a person puts several items on display they probably want it well lit so as to be seen.This would be inside an air conditioned house. I"m presently using mylar sleeves. Is "Mylar" a name brand or is it the stuff these sleeves are made from? Archive quality as pertained to "regular" quality?
 
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