Period Plantation Row 'Slave Cabin' Cooking.

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Plantation Row 'Slave Cabin' Cooking is a booklet by Patricia B. Mitchell.
This booklet explores how slaves on plantations cooked their food and what they cooked. The booklet has some interesting recipes.
1. Brains and Eggs
2. Hog Maw (stomach) Salad.
3. (hog) Jowl and Turnip Salad.
Plantation Row 1.jpg
So now I have to know the difference between Limping Susan and Hopping John. These are sold at some National Parks for a very low price of $3.25.
 
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KianGaf

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Good grief the idea of brains and eggs makes me queasy. I've seen them eaten on the TV. The food network show Diners, Drive & Dives went to Cattleman's Steakhouse in Oklahoma City, OK and they were on the menu.
 

Cycom

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I’ve eaten brain before at an Armenian wedding I went to years ago. It’s repulsive.

Though I’m sure the poor wretches that ate this during that time didn’t quite have the pick of the pantry.
 

KianGaf

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Dublin, Ireland
I’ve never got into eating offal. I’ve never seen hard enough times to have to try it either thank god , which is one of the reason it can be popular. A few older people I know like it , my dad likes liver & a friend has tripe anytime he sees it on a menu. My grandad also spoke favourably about pigs feet or crubeens as they are known here.
 

John Hartwell

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In Brazil I had chicken brains and hearts, roasted on skewers over an open flame -- didn't like 'em. Can't stomach that cloying organ-meat taste that some people seem to love. [It takes all kinds!]
Offal is awful! It's also the basis of much "peasant cuisine," originating with people who only had access to poorer quality proteins -- often the parts habitually discarded as waste by the more 'refined' classes.
 

KianGaf

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Dublin, Ireland
Sounds like scrapple, one of my favorites...Isn't there a topic about scrapple here on CWT??

Isn’t scrapple a Pennsylvania thing ? I always imagine it to be similar to our breakfast white pudding. It’s served in a sausage link shape and served together with black blood sausage or black pudding as it’s known. I’d give scrapple a try but like white pudding , don’t ask what it’s made of.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_pudding
 
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Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Growing up in our home we ate lamb's brains, liver and tripe (lining of a cow's stomach). I wasn't a huge fan of any of them, but they were a staple and the tripe was made better with a white sauce and parsley, the liver with tomato sauce/ketchup, and the brains definitely weren't eaten with egg. It wasn't "soul food" as much as it was whatever was served up at the table and my father loved them all. We also ate what appeared to be the equivalent of raw mince (it was a German specialty) on the likes of pumpernickel bread and other such German delicacies. I have enjoyed black and white pudding in Ireland and never want to know what either of them are made of ... an Irish fry is not the same for me without them. It seems some food crosses boundaries of countries and cultures, and some combinations appear in some countries and not others. They don't eat pumpkin in Ireland, I was told, and only serve it to the pigs. Pumpkin is delicious, and I was sorry only ever to see it there at Halloween for carving 🎃 I did try making soup out of it once, but the pumpkin wasn't fleshy enough. I guess it comes down to what's available and perceptions of what is good to eat and what is not. I haven't subjected my children to brains, liver or tripe, but I think at least one of them has tried liver and likes it. The only thing I wouldn't eat again is brains. Too mushy! There's probably an old adage of "waste not, want not" hidden in some of the recipes.
 

JPChurch

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Manassas VA
Isn’t scrapple a Pennsylvania thing ? I always imagine it to be similar to our breakfast white pudding. It’s served in a sausage link shape and served together with black blood sausage or black pudding as it’s known. I’d give scrapple a try but like white pudding , don’t ask what it’s made of.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_pudding
Some of the best scrapple I've ever had comes from the Pennsylvania Dutch. The have their own farmers' markets up there on weekends. I'd like to try that white pudding you mention!!
 

shooter too

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Mar 4, 2021
"Mountain oysters" anybody? :whistling: They can be cow, hog or any ani-mule. :hungry:

Smoked-Lamb-Testicles-6.jpg

Fries, rocky mountain oysters, eggs, cowboy oysters, balls, or gonads, whatever you call them, the technical name is testicles, and if you’re here, you’re probably looking for a way to eat them. Congratulations, because this is hands-down the best recipe for rocky mountain oysters I’ve ever had–and I’ve eaten plenty.

https://foragerchef.com/smoked-rocky-mountain-oysters/
 

shooter too

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Mar 4, 2021
Those aren't for me. I will stay with sea oysters.

I have not either to tell the truth. I have only--in my experience-- "snipped" them off, tossed 'em in a bucket, then carried them out into a field to let the birds and racoons go at 'em.

Real oysters, on the half shell w/ a dash of Hot sauce. :hungry:
 
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