COL O'Rorke, Patrick Henry

Patrick Henry “Paddy” O’Rorke

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O'rorke.jpg


Born: March 25, 1837

Birthplace: County Cavan Ireland

Father: Patrick O’Rorke 1790 – 1850
(Buried: Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Rochester, New York)​

Mother: Mary Maguire 1797 – 1881
(Buried: Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Rochester, New York)​

Wife: Clarissa Wadsworth Bishop 1840 – 1893
(Buried: Saint Joseph Cemetery, West Roxbury, Massachusetts)​

Education:

June 1861: Graduated from West Point Military Academy – (1st in class)​

Occupation before War:
O'rorke 1.jpg


1842: Immigrated to the United States from Ireland​
Marble Cutter in the State of New York​

Civil War Career:

1861: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, Corps of Engineers​
1861 – 1863: 2nd​ Lt. United States Army, Corps of Engineers​
1861: Drilled Volunteers in Washington, D.C.​
1861: Staff Officer to Brigadier General Daniel Tyler​
1861: Staff Officer at the First Battle of Bull Run, Virginia​
1861: Assistant Engineer, Construction of Washington, D.C. Defenses​
1861: Assistant Engineer, Construction of Fort Monroe Defenses​
1861 – 1862: Served with Port Royal Expeditionary Corps​
1862: Brevetted Captain for Gallantry, Port Royal Expedition​
1862 – 1863: Colonel of 140th New York Infantry Regiment​
1862: Served in the March to Falmouth, Virginia​
1862: Brevetted Major for Gallantry at Battle of Fredericksburg​
1863: 1st Lt. United States Army, Corps of Engineers​
1863: Brevetted Lt. Colonel for Gallantry Battle of Chancellorsville​
1863: Led 526 men onto the field of Battle of Gettysburg​
1863: Killed on the 2nd day of the Battle of Gettysburg​

Died: July 2, 1863

Place of Death: Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Age at time of Death: 27 years old

Burial Place: Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Rochester, New York
 
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Polloco

Major
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
The unit he was leading was under brigade command of General Weed. O'Rorke was on his way to bolster Gen. Sickies 3rd Corp when General Warren directed him to the crest of Little Round Top. He didn't wait to realign his men but charged down the south slope driving the Confecerates back.it was here where He was killed.
 

Adam1stVa

Corporal
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
The unit he was leading was under brigade command of General Weed. O'Rorke was on his way to bolster Gen. Sickies 3rd Corp when General Warren directed him to the crest of Little Round Top. He didn't wait to realign his men but charged down the south slope driving the Confecerates back.it was here where He was killed.
And his troops were loading their rifles as they came into the fray! One of my favorite unit stories on LRT. Chamberlain got a CMH because he survived and Patrick O'Rorke faced as much of a challenging situation as his unit came up LRT "in enfilade" from the Texans and Alabamans assaulting the crest. He missed equal attention because he didn't survive.
 
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rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
May 18, 2011
Location
Carlisle, PA
Warren had been O'Rorke's brigade commander prior to his move to chief engineer. When he approached the 140th New York and saw which unit it was, he called for O'Rorke to follow him to LRT, and O'Rorke didn't hesitate before ordering his men to help their old commander.

Ryan
 

Adam1stVa

Corporal
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
Such a shame. Americans can learn so much about knowledge of such things. Being a native of Chesterfield County, Virginia, I grew up in the middle of battlefields. I made it a point to understand the who, what and where. Much wisdom can be drawn from the deeds of our ancestors, regardless of the politics!
 

Cavalier

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
I think the nickname, if you want to call it that, of the 140th was "The Rochester Regiment". It's too bad O'Rorke's name has been forgotten in his own town. But it is nice to know about the bridge named after him.

@Adam1stVa Just an opinion, but I don't think we can make much of that at all. Sadly, O'Rorke was killed before he could establish much of a battlefield reputation. It's kinda sad to ponder on how many other guys that were capable of great things but were killed before they reached their apparent potential.

John
 

Adam1stVa

Corporal
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
I always like to point out that he was the top of his class at West Point - the June, 1861 - and Custer was the bottom. Make of that what you will.
I should add that Custer was a Native-Born American and O'Rorke was an immigrant. Make what you will of that also.
 

Adam1stVa

Corporal
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
He was a very smart man. I was just pointing out that anyone you ask here in Rochester why the O'Rorke bridge is named that, nobody knows. It's sad. It's a nice bridge though.
You should tell them about the GREAT little Bar in Gettysburg named after him as well. I enjoy drinking a toast to him with a Pitcher of "Lager" (Yuengling - my favorite) every time I go there.
 

Cavalier

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
@Adam1stVa I believe the old Army had a history of anti Irish and anti Catholic sentiment, (witness the San Patricios in the Mexican war), so that seems a possibility to me too.

But, being killed as a Colonel at the head of his Regiment in July of 1863 kind of eliminates him too early on to reach those conclusions, in my opinion. Although not an immigrant, I believe Rosecrans was a Catholic and he commanded an army. I am no kind of expert however.

I agree with you about the saloon named in his honor. A great place that I visit every time I go to Gettysburg. PersonalIy, I would be very flattered if they named a really cool saloon like that after me more than 100 years after I was dead.

John
 

rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
May 18, 2011
Location
Carlisle, PA
I think the nickname, if you want to call it that, of the 140th was "The Rochester Regiment". It's too bad O'Rorke's name has been forgotten in his own town. But it is nice to know about the bridge named after him.

@Adam1stVa Just an opinion, but I don't think we can make much of that at all. Sadly, O'Rorke was killed before he could establish much of a battlefield reputation. It's kinda sad to ponder on how many other guys that were capable of great things but were killed before they reached their apparent potential.

John

The 140th New York was also known as the Rochester Race Horses and the less interesting Monroe County Regiment.

Ryan
 

Polloco

Major
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
In addition to General Tyler , I think he was also on Thomas West Sherman's staff for a little while. The other Sherman.
 
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