Needs Some Knowledge: 1862 Tower/Enfield

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ChuckPaul

Private
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
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Thanks for posting. The Crown with no VR tells me it was made for export and the 25 on the barrel would be for .577. The sights are a mystery and they are NOT original equipment. If you pull the barrel there should be some markings on the bottom of the barrel and a makers mark inside the barrel channel on the stock. Also, as I know they will ask could you post some photos of the butt plate to include the tang. With these muskets I always defer to @Craig L Barry and @Lanyard Puller
Thank you Sir for your insight. I’ll post more pictures.
 
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ikesdad

First Sergeant
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Aug 5, 2016
Location
Western Slope
The 24" "musketoon" alluded to was the Pattern 1853 Artillery Carbine, some of which were purchased by the Confederate Ordnance Board. But; the configuration of @ChuckPaul s Enfield is totally different from the Artillery Pattern..

IMHO it is a cut down P53, assembled long ago from available parts.
Agree. The bead front sight makes me think "shotgun", therefore probably smooth bored and no rifling left. There is no nosecap on the stock. I might be wrong, but the "U" on the band was for US arms, not Enfields.
 
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ChuckPaul

Private
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Nov 21, 2018
Thanks for the info...Is the value reduce since it’s been cut down. Wondering if i should insure it and if it is reduce can I clean it without affecting the value? Thanks again y’all been Great.
 

ChuckPaul

Private
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Then I can shoot it! which would be great! Love learning about history as a novice metal detector, the past seem like its an excellent ‘dos and donts’ in life.
 
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Craig L Barry

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Location
Murfreesboro, TN
Then I can shoot it! which would be great! Love learning about history as a novice metal detector, the past seem like its an excellent ‘dos and donts’ in life.
I'm not sure I would shoot it until you have a competent gunsmith take a look at it. For one thing the percussion cone is rusted into the bolster, you would not be able to clean it properly if you can't remove the cone.
 

ChuckPaul

Private
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
I'm not sure I would shoot it until you have a competent gunsmith take a look at it. For one thing the percussion cone is rusted into the bolster, you would not be able to clean it properly if you can't remove the cone.
Thanks Craig L. Barry, It’s an honor; I read a lot of your articles and respect your knowledge. I can unscrew the percussion cone the photo may not be to clear, she feels good in the hands. But, yes I should taken in and have looked at.
 
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Ralph Heinz

Corporal
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Feb 14, 2016
Location
Pacific Northwest
It appears to be a much shortened P.53 cut off ahead of the middle barrel band and with no brass nose cap. The "Musketoon" is the name given to the P.58 artillery carbine and this is not one of those nor is it a P.56 short rifle.

If it is bored out to smooth bore -- it's been made into a shotgun by someone many years ago.
 

ChuckPaul

Private
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
It appears to be a much shortened P.53 cut off ahead of the middle barrel band and with no brass nose cap. The "Musketoon" is the name given to the P.58 artillery carbine and this is not one of those nor is it a P.56 short rifle.
smooth bore -- it's been made into a shotgun by someone many years ago.

What are the defining characteristics shotgun versus rifle is it just rifling in the barrel and if it is a smoothbore can I still shoot a Mini-ball or just a musket ball. I have modern shotguns and rifles but I’m confused on the terminology since these is my first percussion firearm ...thanks
 
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ChuckPaul

Private
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Nov 21, 2018
If you can unscrew the cone by hand (no tools) that is a red flag. The threads may be so badly rusted and weakened that the cone could blow out along with the powder charge. Just hang it on the wall.
I have perfect place for it... maybe I’ll look into a replica for some plicking...
 
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Urrikane

Private
Joined
Oct 26, 2018
Some more information would be helpful; how long is the barrel ? and the other questions posted by @Ralph Heinz.

The "S&S" stamped inside the lock would be the lock maker, in this case W. Scott & C. Scott, important Birmingham gunsmiths. The other initials are the lock inspector, there were many, and it is if no significance to further ID's.
The stock has been heavily sanded and I'd think most of the marks are long gone.

if I'm not mistaken, the brand of W. Scott & C. Scott is W & C Scott.
S & S should be William Siddons & Sons, gunlock and small parts maker of Whittall Street and 16 St.Mary's Row, Birmingham.

The rifle has a barrel made by the large Manufacturer Henry Clive (1838 to 1869) at 94 Baggott Street, Birmingham
 

ChuckPaul

Private
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
if I'm not mistaken, the brand of W. Scott & C. Scott is W & C Scott.
S & S should be William Siddons & Sons, gunlock and small parts maker of Whittall Street and 16 St.Mary's Row, Birmingham.

The rifle has a barrel made by the large Manufacturer Henry Clive (1838 to 1869) at 94 Baggott Street, Birmingham[/QUOTEThank you Sir
Thank you Sir, excellent informative l appreciate very much. God Speed.
 
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