★★★ Mosby, John Singleton

John Singleton Mosby
:CSA1stNat:

Born:
December 6, 1833
Colonel Mosby.jpg


Birthplace: Powhatan County, Virginia

Father: Alfred Daniel Mosby 1809 – 1880
(Buried: Longwood Cemetery, Bedford, Virginia)​

Mother: Virginia J. McLaurie 1815 – 1897
(Buried: Longwood Cemetery, Bedford, Virginia)​

Wife: Pauline Mariah Clarke 1837 – 1876
(Buried: Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Virginia)​

Married: December 30, 1857 in Nashville, Tennessee

Children:

May Virginia Mosby Campbell 1858 – 1904​
(Buried: Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Virginia)​
Beverly Clarke Mosby 1860 – 1946​
(Buried: Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Virginia)​
John Singleton Mosby Jr. 1863 – 1915​
(Buried: Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Virginia)​
Lincoln Mosby 1865 – 1924
Colonel Mosby 2.jpg
(Buried: Prairie Lawn Cemetery, Wellington, Kansas)​
Victoria Stuart Mosby Coleman 1866 – 1946​
(Buried: Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Virginia)​
Pauline V. Mosby 1869 – 1951​
(Buried: Warrenton Cemetery Warrenton, Virginia)​
Ada B. Mosby 1871 – 1937​
(Buried: Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Virginia)​
George Prentiss Mosby 1873 – 1874​
(Buried: Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Virginia)​
Alfred McLaurine Mosby 1876 – 1876​
(Buried: Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Virginia)​

Education:

Attended University of Virginia​

Occupation before War:
Colonel Mosby 1.jpg


Attorney in Howardsville and Bristol Virginia​
Civil War Career:

1861 – 1862: Private Company D, 1st Virginia Cavalry Regiment​
1862: 1st Lt. And Adjutant, 1st Virginia Cavalry Regiment​
1862: Scout for General J.E.B. Stuart​
1862: Captured by Union Army, Exchanged in July​
1863: Detached to Organize & Command guerrilla forces North Virginia​
1863: Captain of Mosby's Confederate Rangers​
1863 – 1864: Major of Mosby's Confederate Rangers​
1864: Lt. Colonel of 43rd Virginia Cavalry Battalion​
1864 – 1865: Colonel of Mosby's Confederate Rangers
After war.jpg
1865: Disbanded his men after Appomattox - Lee's Surrender​

Occupation after War:

1865 – 1866: Fugitive wanted by the Union Army​
1866: Arrested and Pardoned by Lt. General Ulysses S. Grant​
Attorney in Warrenton, Virginia & San Francisco, California​
U.S. Counsel in Hong Kong, China​

Died: May 30, 1916

Place of Death: Washington, D.C.

Age at time of Death: 82 years old

Burial Place: Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Virginia

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eeric

Private
Joined
Apr 14, 2019
Is there a good bio on him ? I am trying to read a purported auto, one of those printed on demand books, its hard to tell when the editor is speaking or Mosby. He spends a few pages defending Stuart at Gettysburg, but doesn't go into any detail on his part at all, he was on this expedition I believe. And he didnt get a larger command for reasons he doesnt go into. This book leaves alot of questions.
 

Paul Yancey

Sergeant
Joined
Jan 13, 2019
Location
Kentucky
Is there a good bio on him ? I am trying to read a purported auto, one of those printed on demand books, its hard to tell when the editor is speaking or Mosby. He spends a few pages defending Stuart at Gettysburg, but doesn't go into any detail on his part at all, he was on this expedition I believe. And he didnt get a larger command for reasons he doesnt go into. This book leaves alot of questions.
I read Gray Ghost - The Life of John Singleton Mosby by James A. Ramage. Pretty good bio.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Is there a good bio on him ? I am trying to read a purported auto, one of those printed on demand books, its hard to tell when the editor is speaking or Mosby. He spends a few pages defending Stuart at Gettysburg, but doesn't go into any detail on his part at all, he was on this expedition I believe. And he didnt get a larger command for reasons he doesnt go into. This book leaves alot of questions.
Virgil Carrington Jones has "Ranger Mosby" that seems pretty good. Give it a try.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
I'm sure most everyone heard of his (along with 29 of his men) capture of Union General Edwin H. Stoughton at Fairfax Court House on March 8, 1863. It was either this incident or McNeil's capture of Generals Kelly and Crook that Lincoln said he could make more brigadiers but not more horses. The horses seemed to be more of a concern to Lincoln than his generals.
 
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