US Logan, Mary Simmerson Cunningham

Mary Simmerson Cunningham Logan

:us34stars:
Logan 1.jpg


Born: August 15, 1838

Birthplace: Petersburgh, Boone County, Missouri

Father: Captain John Marion Cunningham 1812 – 1873
(Buried: Rose Hill Cemetery, Marion, Illinois)​

Mother: Elizabeth Hicks LaFountaine 1818 – 1866
(Buried: Rose Hill Cemetery, Marion, Illinois)​

Husband: Major General John A. Logan 1826 – 1886
(Buried: U.S. Soldiers and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.)​

Married: November 27, 1855 in Gallatin County, Illinois

Religion: Baptist and Methodist

Children:

John Cunningham Logan 1856 – 1857​
(Buried: Murphysboro City Cemetery, Murphysboro, Illinois)​
Mary Elizabeth “Dollie” Logan Tucker 1858 – 1940​
(Buried: US Soldiers and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.)​
Major John Alexander Logan Jr. 1865 – 1899​
(Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Youngstown, Ohio)​

Education:
Logan.jpg


1855: Graduated from Convent of St. Vincent in Kentucky​

Life Events before War:

1840: Birth of her brother Hibert Brink Cunningham​
1842: Birth of her sister Clementine H. Cunningham​
1846: Birth of her sister Cyrene Hannah Cunningham​
Met her husband thru her father who was his Captain in Mexican War​
1855: Birth of her brother Samuel Knox Cunningham​
1855: Married her husband when she was 16 years old.​
Helped her husband in his political campaigns and offices.​
Worked with Correspondence and Copying for her husband’s office.​
1856: Birth of her son John Cunningham Logan​
1857: Death of her son John Cunningham Logan​
1858: Birth of her daughter Mary Elizabeth “Dollie” Logan​
1859: Birth of her brother Dr. John Marion Cunningham​
1859 – 1862: Wife of U.S. Congressman from Illinois John A. Logan​

Civil War Events:

1859 – 1862: Wife of U.S. Congressman from Illinois John A. Logan​
1861: Lived at her father’s house in Marion, Illinois.
Death.jpg
1861: Joined her husband at Camp in Cairo, Illinois​
1861: Helped care for the wounded at Battle of Belmont Missouri​
1862: Returned to her home in Marion, Illinois.​
1862: Went to Fort Donelson after hearing her husband was wounded​
1862 – 1863: During the Winter lived with her husband in Memphis.​
1863 – 1865: Lived in Carbondale, Illinois.​

Life Events after the War:

1865: Birth of her son John Alexander Logan Jr.​
1866: Death of her mother Elizabeth LaFountaine Cunningham​
1867 – 1871: Wife of U.S. Congressman from Illinois John A. Logan​
1871 – 1877: Wife of U.S. Senator from Illinois John A. Logan​
1871: Death of her brother CSA Captain Hibert B. Cunningham.​
1873: Death of her father Captain John Marion Cunningham​
1879 – 1886: Wife of U.S. Senator from Illinois John A. Logan​
1884: Her husband Was an Unsuccessful Vice President Candidate.​
1886: Her husband became Sick and Died in Washington, D.C.​
Chaperone for George Pullman’s daughters on their trip to Europe.​
1886 – 1923: Widow of Major General John A. “Black Jack” Logan​
1888 – 1908: Editor of The Home Magazine
Served on the Syndicate Staff of Hearst News Service.​
1889: Author The Home manual: Everybody’s guide in social, domestic, and business life
1893: D.C. Commissioner to the Columbian Exposition​
Worked on the plans for Garfield Memorial Hospital.​
President of the Board for plans for Garfield Memorial Hospital​
1895: Author Official, diplomatic and Social etiquette in Washington
1896: Death of her sister Clementine H. Cunningham​
1899: Death of her son Major John Alexander Logan Jr. in Philippines.​
1901: Author Thirty Years in Washington; or Life and Scenes in our National capitol
1908: Author Our National Government; or life and scenes in our national capitol
1912: Author The Part Taken by Women in American History
1913: Author Reminiscences of a soldier’s wife: an autobiography
1922: Author How Memorial Day came to be

Died: February 22, 1923

Place of Death: Washington, D.C.

Cause of Death: Influenza

Age at time of Death: 84 years old

Burial Place: U.S. Soldiers and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
It must have been a joint effort as both Mr. and Mrs. Logan are mentioned as key figures in the Memorial Day movement. On May 5, 1868 General John A. Logan,as commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic,issued a proclamation calling for "Decoration Day". The practice had begun several years earlier in the South.Logan supposedly said "...it was not too late for the Union men of the nation to follow the example of the people of the South".
 
Top