{⋆★⋆} LG Hill, Ambrose Powell

Ambrose Powell Hill

:CSA1stNat:
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Born:
November 9, 1825

Birthplace: Culpepper, Virginia

Father: Major Thomas Hill 1789 – 1857
(Buried: Fairview Cemetery, Culpepper, Virginia)​

Mother: Fannie Russell Baptist 1792 – 1853
(Buried: Fairview Cemetery, Culpepper, Virginia)​

Wife: Catherine “Kitty” Morgan 1834 – 1920
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​

Married: July 18, 1859 in Lexington, Kentucky

Children:

Henrietta “Nettie” Hill 1860 – 1862​
(Buried: Unknown)​
Frances Russell Hill Hale 1861 – 1919​
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​
Lucy Lee Hill MacGill 1863 – 1931​
(Buried: Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia)​
Ann Powell Hill 1865 – 1871​

Education:

1847: Graduated from West Point Military Academy (15th in class)
General Hill 1.jpg

Occupation:

1847: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1847 – 1851: 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1850 – 1860: Served in Office of Coast Survey in Washington, D.C.​
1851 – 1861: 1st Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1861: Resigned from United States Army on March 1st​

Civil War Career:

1861 – 1862: Colonel of 13th Virginia Infantry​
1861: Saw no action during the Battle of First Bull Run​
1862: Brigadier General in the Confederate Army, Infantry
General Hill.jpg
1862: Participated in the Peninsula Campaign​
1862: Participated at the Battle of Williamsburg, Virginia​
1862 – 1863: Major General in the Confederate Army, Infantry​
1862 – 1863: Commander of Hill's Light Division​
1862: Participated in the Seven Days Campaign​
1862: Participated in the Second Battle of Bull Run​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Sharpsburg, (Antietam)​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg​
1863: Wounded in the Calves of his legs at Battle of Chancellorsville​
1863 – 1865: Lt. General in the Confederate Army Infantry​
1863 – 1865: Commander 3rd Army Corps Army of Northern Virginia​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Gettysburg​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Bristoe Station​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Mine Run​
1864: Participated in the Battle of the Wilderness​
1864: Medically Incapacitated during Battle of Spotsylvania
IMG_9866.JPG
1864: Participated in the Battle of North Anna​
1864: Participated in the Battle of Cold Harbor​
1864 – 1865: Participated in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia​
1864 – 1865: Very sick during the Winter months​
1865: Recuperating in Richmond, Virginia​
1865: Killed during Third Battle of Petersburg
IMG_9868.JPG

Died: April 2, 1865

Place of Death: Petersburg, Virginia

Cause of Death: Killed in Battle

Age at time of Death: 39 years old

Original Burial Place: Old Winston Cemetery, Chesterfield Co., Virginia

Burial Place: Ambrose Powell Hill Monument, Richmond, Virginia

IMG_6631.JPG
 
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bdtex

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Cool. We share a birthday. Deaths of soldiers in wartime is sad but it's particularly sad for those killed so close to the end.
 

maximus_flavius

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Jan 1, 2018
Did I read that he had some kind of V.D., & that was why he was sick a lot during the war? I figured that he didn’t wanna live to see the end of the war, & with a terrible disease that couldn’t be medically treated at the time, pushed himself into getting killed.

Thoughts from those who know a lot more than me are welcome.
 

JPChurch

First Sergeant
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Dec 30, 2016
Location
Manassas VA
Read Robertson's book about Hill. He contracted gonorrhea while on leave from West Point, probably from enjoying a brothel visit in NYC. He suffered from bouts of acute/then chronic prostatitis for the rest of his life. Some flare-ups were so awful he couldn't ride his horse, and the fevers associated with it made him sick. Not to mention the inability to pass urine. He was often carried in wagons cause he couldn't walk. It's amazing that he still married and fathered children in between debilitating attacks of his swollen prostate gland. There are those that have thought that this condition he had was the reason he rode out on horseback into an obvious ambush that ended his life. It was certainly evident at that time the Confederate army was soon to be overrun/outnumbered and forced to surrender. Almost as if Hill decided to end his life in a "blaze of glory" rather than suffer from the ill- effects of chronic prostatitis for the rest of his life. All due to him getting "VD."

I used to hunt deer/turkey at Ft. A.P. Hill years ago. Area 10 was loaded with turkey.
 
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Northern Light

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Jul 21, 2014
Did I read that he had some kind of V.D., & that was why he was sick a lot during the war? I figured that he didn’t wanna live to see the end of the war, & with a terrible disease that couldn’t be medically treated at the time, pushed himself into getting killed.

Thoughts from those who know a lot more than me are welcome.
He caught VD while at West Point, gonorrhoea as I recall, but got over it. He was left with severe prostatitis , which flared up during stressful times.
oops, some one got there first!
 

John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Ambrose Powell Hill

Born: November 9, 1825View attachment 331449

Birthplace:
Culpepper, Virginia

Father: Major Thomas Hill 1789 – 1857
(Buried: Fairview Cemetery, Culpepper, Virginia)​

Mother: Fannie Russell Baptist 1792 – 1853
(Buried: Fairview Cemetery, Culpepper, Virginia)​

Wife: Catherine “Kitty” Morgan 1834 – 1920
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​

Married: July 18, 1859 in Lexington, Kentucky

Children:

Henrietta “Nettie” Hill 1860 – 1862​
(Buried: Unknown)​
Frances Russell Hill Hale 1861 – 1919​
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​
Lucy Lee Hill MacGill 1863 – 1931​
(Buried: Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia)​
Ann Powell Hill 1865 – 1871​

Education:

1847: Graduated from West Point Military Academy (15th in class)​

Occupation:

1847: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1847 – 1851: 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1850 – 1860: Served in Office of Coast Survey in Washington, D.C.​
1851 – 1861: 1st Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1861: Resigned from United States Army on March 1st​

Civil War Career:

1861 – 1862: Colonel of 13th Virginia InfantryView attachment 331450
1861: Saw no action during the Battle of First Bull Run​
1862: Brigadier General in the Confederate Army, Infantry​
1862: Participated in the Peninsula Campaign​
1862: Participated at the Battle of Williamsburg, Virginia​
1862 – 1863: Major General in the Confederate Army, Infantry​
1862 – 1863: Commander of Hill's Light Division​
1862: Participated in the Seven Days Campaign​
1862: Participated in the Second Battle of Bull Run​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Sharpsburg, (Antietam)​
1862: Participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg​
1863: Wounded in the Calves of his legs at Battle of Chancellorsville​
1863 – 1865: Lt. General in the Confederate Army Infantry​
1863 – 1865: Commander 3rd Army Corps Army of Northern Virginia​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Gettysburg​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Bristoe Station​
1863: Participated in the Battle of Mine Run​
1864: Participated in the Battle of the Wilderness​
1864: Medically Incapacitated during Battle of SpotsylvaniaView attachment 331451
1864: Participated in the Battle of North Anna​
1864: Participated in the Battle of Cold Harbor​
1864 – 1865: Participated in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia​
1864 – 1865: Very sick during the Winter months​
1865: Recuperating in Richmond, Virginia​
1865: Killed during Third Battle of PetersburgView attachment 331454

Died: April 2, 1865

Place of Death: Petersburg, Virginia

Cause of Death: Killed in Battle

Age at time of Death: 39 years old

Original Burial Place: Old Winston Cemetery, Chesterfield Co., Virginia

Burial Place: Ambrose Powell Hill Monument, Richmond, Virginia

They take down Master Lee's monuments but A. P. Hill's still remains ,can you explain? Interesting that he dies the way that Jackson would have envied .Question.Was his and Jackson's relation as difficult as is recorded even though it seems as AP was the general he depended upon at critical times as at Chancellorsville and then at his death as he called up AP HILL ? Then why did he not give Hill command instead of Stuart at Chancellorsville?
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
I was going to say seniority but Hill outranked Stuart by 2 months. From what I remember command had to be given to no less than a major general but both Hill + Stuart we're MGs. Other than friendship I really don't know why
They take down Master Lee's monuments but A. P. Hill's still remains ,can you explain? Interesting that he dies the way that Jackson would have envied .Question.Was his and Jackson's relation as difficult as is recorded even though it seems as AP was the general he depended upon at critical times as at Chancellorsville and then at his death as he called up AP HILL ? Then why did he not give Hill command instead of Stuart at Chancellorsville?
 

diane

Retired User
Joined
Jan 23, 2010
Location
State of Jefferson
Happy birthday, Little Powell! Little Powell was what his soldiers called him. He was definitely one of Lee's more colorful officers and a great asset to him - when he wasn't being impulsive. Hill didn't take charge after Chancellorsville because he had been wounded. He was almost killed in the fire that took down Jackson, only saved himself by becoming one with the road he was lying on! He applied a tourniquet to Jackson's arm and held him until medics arrived, talking to him so he wouldn't take a fade, but when he went to get his horse a cannonball whizzed close by his legs, cutting the tops off his thigh-high boots. That put him out of the command line. He and Jackson reconciled at that point but before that, you couldn't find two officers more upset with each other than these two. Hill called Jackson 'that crazy Presbyterian' and Jackson thought Hill was a diva. In the end, he and Lee became close - Longstreet was wounded, Stuart and Jackson were dead. Hill was a compassionate person and a good listener - that was what Lee really needed at that particular time. Hill was actually dying at the time he was shot - his kidneys were failing and he was quite sick - but it was something he would have preferred. He had said he didn't want to live to see Richmond fall, and he didn't.
 

dhh712

Private
Joined
Jul 12, 2014
Location
Gettysburg, PA
He applied a tourniquet to Jackson's arm and held him until medics arrived, talking to him so he wouldn't take a fade, but when he went to get his horse a cannonball whizzed close by his legs, cutting the tops off his thigh-high boots. That put him out of the command line. He and Jackson reconciled at that point but before that, you couldn't find two officers more upset with each other than these two. Hill called Jackson 'that crazy Presbyterian' and Jackson thought Hill was a diva.

I always find that scene so touching in my mind when Hill tries to take care of Jackson in his wounding. Personality differences aside, when it came down to it, they cared for each other (well, at least Hill did for Jackson though I'm sure it would have been so the other way around).

@Polloco and @John S. Carter I think it was personality differences. Hill thought Jackson a little odd and rather phlegmatic; Jackson saw Hill as an upstart. The only thing I can recall right now is that he saw that Hill was dragging his feet at Orange right before Cedar Mountain. I think there was some other instances, but stuff like that really irked him. He didn't like the way Hill responded to his criticism though I'm not sure what response would have been acceptable to him.

A.P. Hill is one of the generals I never got into, but the more I read about him, I think I'm going to have to get that Robertson's bio of him. I'm sure it's just as good a read as the Jackson bio; Robertson was an amazing author. RIP.
 

dhh712

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Location
Gettysburg, PA
Then why did he not give Hill command instead of Stuart at Chancellorsville?

I want to say because at that point Stuart was more familiar with the battle from Jackson's perspective, but my memory may be deceiving me as it so often does. Maybe someone else more familiar can give the reason.
 

diane

Retired User
Joined
Jan 23, 2010
Location
State of Jefferson
Stephen Sear's order of battle in his book shows A. P. Hill assuming command a very short time until Hill's wounding.

That's so. Hill was in command for literally a couple minutes! The command should then have gone to Robert Rodes, who had led the famous flank attack and done very well, but he was not known to the troops. Stuart was. Hill decided to send for Stuart because he could stabilize the men - news about Jackson going down was spreading all over with devastating effect.

The interesting thing about this was there was a long delay for Stuart to get from where he was on the Rapidan to Jackson's location. Had Hill not been wounded, he very likely would have pressed the attack as Jackson had intended and Hooker's army would have been rolled up like a wet blanket. Joe Hooker...was not doing well at that moment!
 
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