{⋆★⋆} BG Gordon, James Byron

James Byron Gordon

:CSA1stNat:
Gordon.jpg


Born: November 2, 1822

Birthplace: Wilkesboro, North Carolina

Father: Major Nathaniel Gordon 1784 – 1829
(Buried: Saint Paul’s Episcopal, Wilkesboro, North Carolina)​

Mother: Sarah Gwyn 1798 – 1889
(Buried: Saint Paul’s Episcopal, Wilkesboro, North Carolina)​

Education:

Attended Emory and Henry College​

Occupation before War:

Mercantile Businessman in Wilkesboro, North Carolina​
Supervised the farm her inherited from his father​
1850: North Carolina State Representative​

Civil War Career:

1861: Enlisted as a Private in Wilkes Valley Guards​
1861: 1st Lt. Company B 1st North Carolina Infantry Regiment​
1861 – 1863: Major of 1st North Carolina Cavalry Regiment​
1861: Served in the Battle of Vienna, Virginia​
1862: Served in the fighting in North Carolina against Burnside​
1862: Participated in the Seven Days Campaign in Virginia​
1862: Served in Second Battle of Manassas, Virginia​
1862: Served in Battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland​
1862: Served in Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia​
1863: Served in Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia​
1863: Served in the Battle of Brandy Station, Virginia​
1863: Served in Stuart’s Horse Raid into Pennsylvania​
1863: Temporary Colonel of 2nd North Carolina Cavalry Regiment​
1863: Colonel of 1st North Cavalry Regiment​
1863: Served in the cavalry fighting at Battle of Gettysburg​
1863: Acting Brigade Commander at Battle of Jack’s Shop​
1863: Drove back union forces at Bethesaida Church on October 10th
1863: Accompanied Lee’s Army from near Culpeper Court House​
1863: Led the center in what was known as “Buckland Races”​
1863: Had his horse shot from under him at Mine Run Campaign​
1863: His rank as Brigadier General was backdated back to 1863​
1864: Confirmed as Brigadier General of Confederate Army Cavalry​
1864: Served in the Battle of Atlee’s Station in turning back a raid​
1864: Served in the Battle of the Wilderness, Virginia​
1864: Served in the Battle of Spotsylvania, Virginia​
1864: Served in the fighting at Battle of Yellow Tavern, Virginia​
1864: Mortally Wounded during Battle of Meadow’s Bridge, Virginia​

Died: May 18, 1864

Place of Death: Officers Hospital in Richmond, Virginia

Cause of Death: Died from wounds received in battle

Age at time of Death: 41 years old

Burial Place: Saint Paul’s Episcopal, Wilkesboro, North Carolina
 
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Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
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Nov 8, 2018
Location
Palm Coast, Florida
I often get his name confused with the much more famous John Brown Gordon of Georgia.
Seems I'm not the only one. It seems that Francis Barlow, when he heard about the death of "General J. B. Gordon" near Richmond, thought the report referred to the man who he met at Gettysburg (this may be one of those stories that may have been made up for the papers, but still, its funny that James Gordon is probably most famous for that).
 

Polloco

Major
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
An all North Carolina brigade was created for General L.S. Baker in the reorganization in 1863. Gordon led this unit as a colonel temporarily in anticipation of the wounded Baker returning. When it became apparent that Baker would not be fit for field duty Gordon was promoted to Brigadier and took over the brigade. He led his fellow North Carolinians through Bristoe, Mine Run, and the Overland Campaigns.
 

Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Location
Palm Coast, Florida
An all North Carolina brigade was created for General L.S. Baker in the reorganization in 1863. Gordon led this unit as a colonel temporarily in anticipation of the wounded Baker returning. When it became apparent that Baker would not be fit for field duty Gordon was promoted to Brigadier and took over the brigade. He led his fellow North Carolinians through Bristoe, Mine Run, and the Overland Campaigns.
I find this odd, considering that Baker had been Colonel of the 1st, GOrdon the Ltc. But weren't there other Colonels already senior to him from the other regiments?
 
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