Gettysburg's Peach Orchard


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lelliott19

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Bumping this thread as a reminder, since the book will be available by July 3, 2019.

Has anyone already purchased the online book and read it?

Here are a couple of reviews from Savas Beatie's website:

"In this finely detailed study of the clash in and around Joseph Sherfy’s Peach Orchard on July 2 at Gettysburg, James Hessler and Britt Isenberg restore the voices of Union and Confederate soldiers of all ranks who demonstrated a depth of courage and commitment far too often overshadowed in the historical narrative by controversies centering on Generals Sickles and Longstreet. Their analysis of the decidedly underappreciated fighting on this front is particularly outstanding. Every student of the fighting on the Union left at Gettysburg will find fresh insights in this deeply researched work.” - Carol Reardon, co-author of A Field Guide to Gettysburg

“The Civil War has many blood-soaked acres; once-peaceful pastures, fields, and orchards were suddenly thrust into and immortalized by the maelstrom of war. On the afternoon of July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, one such place suddenly became ‘The Peach Orchard,’ a scene of some of the most intense and confusing fighting of the entire war. The authors bring that encounter to vivid life in this outstanding new study with an ease of phrase and narrative clarity all battle studies should strive to achieve.” - David A. Powell, award-winning author of the Chickamauga Campaign trilogy and Union Command Failure in the Shenandoah

https://www.savasbeatie.com/gettysburgs-peach-orchard-longstreet-sickles-and-the-bloody-fight-for-the-commanding-ground-along-the-emmitsburg-road/
 

cipollinaj

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Hi. New to forum. First post. I own a muster roll of the first New York light artillery Company G dated June 30th 1863 in which they state they are in Taneytown . Little did they know they would be in the middle of the fighting in the peach orchard two days later. I wonder if they are mentioned in the book. Regards.
 

rpkennedy

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Hi. New to forum. First post. I own a muster roll of the first New York light artillery Company G dated June 30th 1863 in which they state they are in Taneytown . Little did they know they would be in the middle of the fighting in the peach orchard two days later. I wonder if they are mentioned in the book. Regards.
I imagine that they'll be mentioned since they were positioned at the crossroads of the Emmitsburg Road and Wheatfield Road. Battery G, 1st New York Light Artillery had quite an artillery duel prior to McLaws' advance. In fact, Sgt. Burdick's gun managed to hit and dismount one of Alexander's guns at a range of about 600 yards, quite a piece of shooting. Plus, they were lucky and got out before the infantry fighting broke out because they ran out of ammunition.

Ryan
 

lelliott19

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Hello @cipollinaj and welcome to Civil War Talk - the best place on the internet for Civil War discussion.

In his Historical Sketch of Battery G, 1st New York Light Artillery, Captain Nelson Ames described the July 2-3, 1863 as follows:

The battery was soon ordered to report to Major General Sickles, who commanded the Third Army Corps, and as the enemy under General Long-street advanced to the attack, we were ordered by General Sickles to advance and take position on the angle of our line in the Peach Orchard and hold the position at all hazard, as that was the key to that portion of the line of battle. We were engaged in this position from 4 to 7 p. m., and were supported by General Graham's troops of the Third Corps.
Our lines having been broken both on our right and left, and being short of ammunition, it was doubtful if we could save our guns, but after desperate fighting we were able to save them, and also brought off our wounded with us.
During the night of the 2d we refilled our ammunition chests and refitted the battery ready for action. July 3d we were in position with the Second Corps on the front line of battle, and took part in the terrible artillery duel, also in repelling Pickett's charge, and thus ending one of the most fearful battles of the war.

And of the dedication of the monument, Ames recalled:
There were no formal exercises dedicating the monument to Battery G, First Regiment, New York Light Artillery, on the battlefield of Gettysburg, July 3, 1893. But thirteen of the survivors of the battery were present, and we dedicated the noble monument in silence and in tears. No one wanted to make a speech, and none was made. Our meeting was like the meeting of a family, and formalities seemed out of place. We dedicated the monument with our tears, prayed for our dead comrades and for each other, and indulged ourselves in loving each other and the flag under which we fought so long and so faithfully. https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/artillery/1stArtLt/1stArtLtBatG.htm
 

rpkennedy

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Hello @cipollinaj and welcome to Civil War Talk - the best place on the internet for Civil War discussion.

In his Historical Sketch of Battery G, 1st New York Light Artillery, Captain Nelson Ames described the July 2-3, 1863 as follows:

The battery was soon ordered to report to Major General Sickles, who commanded the Third Army Corps, and as the enemy under General Long-street advanced to the attack, we were ordered by General Sickles to advance and take position on the angle of our line in the Peach Orchard and hold the position at all hazard, as that was the key to that portion of the line of battle. We were engaged in this position from 4 to 7 p. m., and were supported by General Graham's troops of the Third Corps.
Our lines having been broken both on our right and left, and being short of ammunition, it was doubtful if we could save our guns, but after desperate fighting we were able to save them, and also brought off our wounded with us.
During the night of the 2d we refilled our ammunition chests and refitted the battery ready for action. July 3d we were in position with the Second Corps on the front line of battle, and took part in the terrible artillery duel, also in repelling Pickett's charge, and thus ending one of the most fearful battles of the war.

And of the dedication of the monument, Ames recalled:
There were no formal exercises dedicating the monument to Battery G, First Regiment, New York Light Artillery, on the battlefield of Gettysburg, July 3, 1893. But thirteen of the survivors of the battery were present, and we dedicated the noble monument in silence and in tears. No one wanted to make a speech, and none was made. Our meeting was like the meeting of a family, and formalities seemed out of place. We dedicated the monument with our tears, prayed for our dead comrades and for each other, and indulged ourselves in loving each other and the flag under which we fought so long and so faithfully. https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/artillery/1stArtLt/1stArtLtBatG.htm
Nelson Ames exaggerated when his battery was in position. They left about the same time that Kershaw's left 3 regiments were regrouping from their attack. They were short on ammunition and got out when Lt. Malbone Watson's battery arrived to relieve Ames.

Ryan
 

Tom Elmore

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Nelson Ames exaggerated when his battery was in position. They left about the same time that Kershaw's left 3 regiments were regrouping from their attack. They were short on ammunition and got out when Lt. Malbone Watson's battery arrived to relieve Ames.

Ryan
Except I don't think Watson's battery was ever there.
 

rpkennedy

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Except I don't think Watson's battery was ever there.
I know that there is some controversy about exactly which battery arrived to relieve Ames and believe that Pfanz settled on Watson. That said, I had forgotten the previous discussion of this switch. Admittedly, it's been a while since I studied the Peach Orchard in detail.

Ryan
 
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Hi. New to forum. First post. I own a muster roll of the first New York light artillery Company G dated June 30th 1863 in which they state they are in Taneytown . Little did they know they would be in the middle of the fighting in the peach orchard two days later. I wonder if they are mentioned in the book. Regards.
Welcome, enjoy
 

Andy Cardinal

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Hi. New to forum. First post. I own a muster roll of the first New York light artillery Company G dated June 30th 1863 in which they state they are in Taneytown . Little did they know they would be in the middle of the fighting in the peach orchard two days later. I wonder if they are mentioned in the book. Regards.
Welcome from northeast Ohio!
 

Andrew

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I had that on my Amazon list and noticed a few days ago that the Kindle version was free. So of course I bought it. I'm about 2/3 of the way through it and it is excellent. I think it is extremely well-written and there are a good number of maps. Highly recommended.
 


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