★  Ewing, Thomas Jr.

Thomas Ewing Jr.

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Born: August 7, 1829

Birthplace: Lancaster, Ohio

Father: Thomas Ewing Sr. 1789 – 1871
(Buried: Saint Mary Catholic Cemetery, Lancaster, Ohio)​

Mother: Maria Willis Boyle 1801 – 1864
(Buried: Saint Mary Catholic Cemetery, Lancaster, Ohio)​

1st Wife: Ellen Cox 1833 – 1880
(Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Yonkers, New York)​

2nd Wife: Julia Ann Beauchemin 1834 – 1925
(Buried: Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Kansas)​

Children:

William Cox Ewing Unknown – 1927​
(Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Yonkers, New York)​
Maria Ewing Martin 1858 – 1942​
(Buried: Forest Rose Cemetery, Lancaster, Ohio)​
Thomas Ewing III 1862 – 1942​
(Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Yonkers, New York)​
Mary Beall Ewing 1864 – 1938​
(Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Yonkers, New York)​
Hampton Denman Ewing 1866 – 1939​
(Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Yonkers, New York)​

Education:

1854: Graduated from Brown University​

Occupation before War:

1849 – 1850: Private Secretary to President Zachary Taylor​
1855 – 1856: Attorney in Cincinnati, Ohio​
1856 – 1861: Attorney in Leavenworth, Kansas​
1858: Member of Leavenworth Constitutional Convention​

Civil War Career:

1861: Delegate to Washington, D.C. Peace Conference​
1861 – 1862: Chief Justice of Kansas State Supreme Court​
1862 – 1863: Colonel of 11th Kansas Infantry Regiment​
1862: Served in the Battle of Old Fort Wayne, Indian Territory
Ewing 1.jpg
1862: Served in the Battle of Cane Hill, Arkansas​
1862: Served in the Battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas​
1863 – 1865: Brigadier General, Union Army Volunteers​
Union Army Commander of District of the Border​
Responsible for General Order No. 11 being Issued​
1864: Deputy Commander of District of St. Louis, Missouri​
1864: Union Army Commander at Battle of Fort Davidson​
1865: Resigned from the Union Army on February 23rd
1866: Brevetted Major General for his service in the war​

Occupation after War:

1865: Attorney for two Ford’s theater employees in conspiracy trial​
1865 – 1870: Attorney in Washington, D.C.​
Helped obtain a pardon for Dr. Samuel Mudd from President Johnson​
1870 – 1877: Attorney in Lancaster, Ohio​
1870 – 1877: Investor in Railroad and telegraph companies​
1873 – 1874: Member of Ohio State Constitutional Convention​
1877 – 1881: United States Congressman from Ohio​
1879: Unsuccessful Candidate for the office of Governor of Ohio​
1881 – 1896: Attorney in New York City, New York​

Died: January 21, 1896

Place of Death: New York City, New York

Cause of Death: Shock from fracture of Skull after hit by cable car

Age at time of Death: 66 years old

Burial Place: Oakland Cemetery, Yonkers, New York
 
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DixieRifles

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There probably aren't many students of the Civil War who do not know this man was Sherman's brother-in-law.

And brother to:

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Hugh Boyle Ewing, (October 31, 1826 – June 30, 1905)


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Charles Ewing (March 6, 1835 – June 20, 1883)


MrSherman.JPG

Eleanor "Ellie" Boyle Ewing (October 4, 1824 – November 28, 1888) -- wife of General W. T. Sherman.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
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Brother in law AND stepbrother, as by all accounts his father had all but adopted Sherman into the Ewing family
Not to mention Eleanor (Mrs. Sherman). I suppose that "step brother marrying a step sister" would later be frowned on by society but it seemed fairly common back then. Didn't the Henry Rathbones do it as well?
 
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That General Order # 11 which he was responsible for came on Augustv25, 1863 and forced 4 counties in western Missouri to evacuate. All inhabitants were forced to leave their farms and move to communities near military outposts. It was intended to deprive Confederate guerrillas of support but had an opposite effect as civillians supported the guerillas even more. It was repealed in January 1864.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
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The 2 that he and his law partner, Orville Browning, represented at the Lincoln Conspiracy Trial (Samuel Arnold and Edmund Spangler) were sentenced to federal prison at Fort Jefferson and not hanged like the others.Mudd was not represented by Ewing but was sought out by Mudd's family.
 
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