★ ★  Clay, Cassius M.

Cassius Marcellus Clay
:us34stars:
Clay 1.jpg


Born: October 19, 1810

Birthplace: Madison County, Kentucky

Father: Green Clay 1757 – 1828
(Buried: Green Clay Cemetery, Richmond, Kentucky)​

Mother: Sally Lewis 1776 – 1867
(Buried: Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Kentucky)​
Brother: U.S. Rep. Brutus Junius Clay of KY 1808-1878
(Buried: Auvergne Cemetery, Paris, Kentucky)

1st Wife: Mary Jane Warfield 1815 – 1900
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​

2nd Wife: Dora Richardson 1880 – 1914
(Buried: Midway Cemetery, Midway, Kentucky)​

Children:

Elisha Warfield Clay 1835 – 1851​
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​
Major Green Clay 1837 – 1883​
(Buried: Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Kentucky)​
Mary Barr Clay 1839 – 1924​
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​
Sarah Lewis “Sally” Clay Bennett 1841 – 1935​
(Buried: Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Kentucky)​
Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. 1843 – 1843​
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​
Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. 1845 – 1857​
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​
Brutus Junius Clay 1847 – 1932
Clay.jpg
(Buried: Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Kentucky)​
Laura Clay 1849 – 1941​
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​
Flora Clay 1851 – 1851​
(Buried: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky)​
Anne Clay Crenshaw 1859 – 1945​
(Buried: Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia)​
Leonide Henry “Launey” Clay 1866 – 1933​
(Buried: Tod Homestead, Youngstown, Ohio)​

Education:

Attended Transylvania University​
1832: Graduated from Yale College​

Occupation before War:

Member of the Anti-Slavery Movement​
1835 – 1841: Kentucky State Representative​
1843: Survived assassination attempt by Sam Brown​
Fought Sam Brown with a Bowie Knife​
Publisher of True American Newspaper
Mob of 60 Broke into printing office, robbing his printing equipment​
Reset up his Newspaper in Cincinnati, Ohio​
1846 – 1847: Served in Mexican-American War as Captain​
1849: Attacked by six Turner Brothers, he fought back with his knife​
1853: Granted 10 acres of land, founding the town of Berea, Kentucky​
1855: Founder of Free Founded Berea College in Berea, Kentucky​
Founder of the Republican Party in Kentucky​
1860: Supporter of Abraham Lincoln for the President Campaign​
1860: Candidate for Republican Party Vice-Presidential Nomination
Clay 2.jpg

Civil War Career:

1861 – 1862: United States Minister to Russia​
1862 – 1863: Major General in the Union Army​
1863: Resigned as Major General in Union Army​
1863 – 1869: United States Minister to Russia​
Helped with the negotiations for the Purchase of Alaska​

Occupation after War:

1863 – 1869: United States Minister to Russia​
Founder of Cuban Charitable Aid Society​
Advocate for the nationalization of Railroads​
1869: Left his support of the Republican Political Party​
1872: One of the organizers of the Liberal Republican Party​
1872: Helped secure the Nomination for Horace Greeley​
1876: Supporter of Samuel J. Tilden for President Campaign​
1878: Divorced his wife after 45 years of marriage​
1880: Supporter of Winfield S. Hancock for President Campaign​
1884: Rejoined the Republican Political Party​
1884: Supporter of James G Blaine for President Campaign
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Known to have carried two pistols and a Bowie knife for protection​
Installed a cannon to protect his home and office​
1890: President of Kentucky State Constitutional Convention​

Died: July 22, 1903

Place of Death: White Hall, Richmond, Kentucky

Cause of Death: General exhaustion

Age at time of Death: 92 years old

Burial Place: Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Kentucky

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Joined
Sep 15, 2018
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In the early stages of the War, before Bull Run, Washington DC was guarded by several "regiments". One was Senator James Lanes group of volunteers the other was Clay's unit. I think they called themselves the Clay Battalion Washington Guards. I think there are pictures of them camping on the Capitol grounds.
 

James N.

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His resignation came because he refused to serve when Union forces were protecting slavery in occupied parts of the South. He truly hated slavery and resigned his generalcy on March 11, 1863.
He also had been treated somewhat oddly and shabbily by former USN officer Maj. Gen. William "Bull" Nelson during the opening phases of the Perryville Campaign in August, 1862. Nelson had been sent by D. C. Buell to take charge and organize a defense of the state under immediate threat of invasion. When he traveled form the capital in Lexington to Richmond he found Clay with a militia force guarding an easily defended ford and bluff near his estate, Nelson removed him from his command giving it to a subordinate and very unwisely advancing the whole to Richmond where it was soon defeated and routed by Kirby Smith's Confederates. In that case at least it seems militia general Clay had the better plan!
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
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Clay was cousins to both Henry Clay and Clement C. Clay, governor of Alabama. This Clement C. Clay was Clement Comer Clay not to be confused with Clement Claiborne Clay who was a Confederate Senator, also from Alabama.Though a little research might also put Clement Claiborne Clay in the family tree as well.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Clay was cousins to both Henry Clay and Clement C. Clay, governor of Alabama. This Clement C. Clay was Clement Comer Clay not to be confused with Clement Claiborne Clay who was a Confederate Senator, also from Alabama.Though a little research might also put Clement Claiborne Clay in the family tree as well.
Actually I guess Clement Claiborne Clay was a cousin as well as He was the son of Governor Clement Comer Clay.
 
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