{⋆★⋆} BG Armistead, Lewis A.

Lewis Addison Armistead

Lewis_A._Armistead.jpg

:CSA1stNat: Lewis Armistead
began his Military career as a student at West Point Military Academy, but resigned due to a combination of academic issues, and an incident where he broke a plate over a fellow cadet's head. He joined the army and served in the Mexican-American War, as well as the Mohave War. At the outbreak of Civil War, he traveled east to join the Confederacy. Serving under Robert E. Lee in the Army of Northern Virginia, he became a brigadier general, and participated in many eastern battles. At Gettysburg, on July 3, 1863, as part of Pickett's Charge, Armistead led his men to the farthest point reached by Confederate forces during the charge, a point now referred to as the high-water mark of the Confederacy. However, he and his brigade were overwhelmed, and he was hit by three bullets and captured by Union troops. Even though his wounds were thought to be survivable, he died in a nearby field hospital two days later.

Born: February 18, 1817

Birthplace: New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina

Nickname: Lo (short for Lothario)

Father: Colonel Walker Keith Armistead
(Buried: Armistead Family Cemetery, Upperville, Virginia)​

Mother: Elizabeth Stanly 1791 – 1861
(Buried: Armistead Family Cemetery, Upperville, Virginia)​

1st​ Wife: Cecilia Lee Love 1823 – 1850
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery, Mobile, Alabama)​

Married: February 13, 1844 in Lowndes County, Alabama

2nd​ Wife: Cornelia Lee Taliaferro 1828 – 1855
(Buried: Fort Riley Post Cemetery, Fort Riley, Kansas)​

Married: March 17, 1853 at Christ Church, Alexandria, Virginia

Children:

Lt. Walker Keith Armistead Sr. 1844 – 1896​
(Buried: Berkeley Memorial Cemetery, Middletown, Rhode Island)​
Flora Love Armistead 1846 – 1850​
(Buried: Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, LeMay, Missouri)​
Lewis B. Armistead – 1854​
Education:

Attended West Point Military Academy, resigning in 1839​
Occupation before War:

1839 – 1844: 2nd​ Lt. in United States Army Infantry​
1844 – 1855: 1st​ Lt. in United States Army​
1847: Wounded during Battle of Chapultepec, Mexico​
1855 – 1861: Captain in United States Army​

Civil War Career:

1861: Major in the Confederate Army​
1861 – 1862: Colonel of 57th​ Virginia Infantry Regiment​
1862: Brigade Commander during Battle of Seven Pines, Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander for Seven Days Campaign, Virginia​
1862: Led the assault during Battle of Malvern Hill, Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander Second Battle of Bull Run, Virginia​
1862: Provost Marshal Army of Northern Virginia at Antietam
2013 Old St. Paul's Cemetery 012.JPG
1862: Brigade Commander Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia​
1863: Served in the fighting around Norfolk, Virginia​
1863: Mortally Wounded, Brigade Commander, Battle of Gettysburg, Pickett’s Charge​

Died: July 5, 1863

Place of Death: Field Hospital, George Spangler Farm, Gettysburg PA

Cause of Death: Bacterium, Fever and Prostration

Age at time of Death: 46 years old

Burial Place: Old Saint Paul’s Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland


2013 Old St. Paul's Cemetery 014.JPG
 
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Tom Elmore

1st Lieutenant
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After being wounded at Gettysburg on the afternoon of July 3, Armistead was taken by Federal soldiers to a hospital established at the George Spangler farm. He died two days later, reportedly in the kitchen. The summer kitchen was a small outbuilding near the house; here is an interior view taken in 2013:
GettysburgSpanglerOutbuildingArmistead2013.JPG
 

DaveBrt

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Location
Charlotte, NC
Lewis Addison Armistead

View attachment 333382
Lewis Armistead
began his Military career as a student at West Point Military Academy, but resigned due to a combination of academic issues, and an incident braking a plate over a fellow cadet's head. He joined the U.S. Army and served in the Mexican-American War, and the Mohave War. At the outbreak of Civil War, he traveled east to join the Confederacy. Serving under Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, he became a brigadier general, and participated in many eastern battles. At Gettysburg, on July 3, 1863, as part of Pickett's Charge, Armistead led his men to the farthest point reached by Confederate forces during the charge, a point now referred to as the high-water mark of the Confederacy. However, he and his brigade were overwhelmed, and he was hit by three bullets and captured by Union troops. Even though his wounds were thought to be survivable, he died in a nearby field hospital two days later.

Born: February 18, 1817

Birthplace: New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina

Nickname: Lo (short for Lothario)

Father: Colonel Walker Keith Armistead
(Buried: Armistead Family Cemetery, Upperville, Virginia)​

Mother: Elizabeth Stanly 1791 – 1861
(Buried: Armistead Family Cemetery, Upperville, Virginia)​

1st​ Wife: Cecilia Lee Love 1823 – 1850
(Buried: Magnolia Cemetery, Mobile, Alabama)​

Married: February 13, 1844 in Lowndes County, Alabama

2nd​ Wife: Cornelia Lee Taliaferro 1828 – 1855
(Buried: Fort Riley Post Cemetery, Fort Riley, Kansas)​

Married: March 17, 1853 at Christ Church, Alexandria, Virginia

Children:

Lt. Walker Keith Armistead Sr. 1844 – 1896​
(Buried: Berkeley Memorial Cemetery, Middletown, Rhode Island)​
Flora Love Armistead 1846 – 1850​
(Buried: Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, LeMay, Missouri)​
Lewis B. Armistead – 1854​
Education:

Attended West Point Military Academy, resigning in 1839​
Occupation before War:

1839 – 1844: 2nd​ Lt. in United States Army Infantry​
1844 – 1855: 1st​ Lt. in United States Army​
1847: Wounded during Battle of Chapultepec, Mexico​
1855 – 1861: Captain in United States Army​

Civil War Career:

1861: Major in the Confederate Army​
1861 – 1862: Colonel of 57th​ Virginia Infantry Regiment​
1862: Brigade Commander during Battle of Seven Pines, Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander for Seven Days Campaign, Virginia​
1862: Led the assault during Battle of Malvern Hill, Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander Second Battle of Bull Run, Virginia​
1862: Provost Marshal Army of Northern Virginia at AntietamView attachment 333383
1862: Brigade Commander Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia​
1863: Served in the fighting around Norfolk, Virginia​
1863: Mortally Wounded, Brigade Commander, Battle of Gettysburg, Pickett’s Charge​

Died: July 5, 1863

Place of Death: Field Hospital, George Spangler Farm, Gettysburg PA

Cause of Death: Bacterium, Fever and Prostration

Age at time of Death: 46 years old

Burial Place: Old Saint Paul’s Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland


I like the improved format.
 

CivilWarTalk

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I like the improved format.

It was always intended, but it took some time to make happen. It's still a work in progress.

I'm starting from a one paragraph stock "Wikipedia" bio, tearing it completely apart, ripping a lot of the "dumb" out of it, and stuffing a lot of the charm a substance that is missing back in, and then trying to rebuild it, and still be concise. It's not the easiest thing to do.
 

rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
Member of the Year
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Location
Carlisle, PA
Interestingly, Wayne Motts has come to the conclusion that Armistead probably died from a pulmonary embolism, likely caused by the wound he suffered to the leg (he was also shot in the arm). He was in fairly good condition when he arrived at the Eleventh Corps hospital and was conversing with others while there. On the 5th, he took a very sudden downturn and died extremely quickly, much to the surprise of the doctors there.

Ryan
 

rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
Member of the Year
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Location
Carlisle, PA
He's the one who broke a plate over cadet Jubal Early's head at West Point.
He did and was allowed to resign. And was then appointed as 2nd lieutenant at the same time as his peers graduated.

Interestingly, Armistead was held back and never left his plebe year before resigning.

Ryan
 

NH Civil War Gal

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Totally agree though in sense also proud of ole Jube for doing something to get him to break a plate over his head....wish I had heard the lead up to that incident!
I know! Wouldn't it have been fun to be the fly on the wall for that one!
 

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