The Non-Celtic Confederacy

Henry Brown

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Baille Mor = city ( Large town). Adjectives normally follow nouns, adjectives can go to the front if the adjective is emphasized.
well i said " i thought " but you can't really determine the sources. i am pretty sure of the petti part but on the mor or more part ...
It may also have been a nickname for someone of dark or swarthy complexion, deriving from the Old French "more", dark-skinned. There was also a personal name of the same origin, which was borne by several early saints. The given name was introduced into England by the Normans, but was never as popular in England as on the Continent. In Ireland the surname originated as an Anglicized form of the Gaelic "O'Mordha", composed of the elements "O", descendant of, with "Mordha", a byname meaning great, proud, or stately. In Scotland and Wales it was a nickname for a large man, deriving from the Gaelic "mor", Welsh "mowr", big, great.
anyway lowland scots have their origins as celts but have become much intermingled with many other peoples of different ethnic origins.
nobody has , unless i missed it, given any evidence that the south was primarily of anglo-saxon decent. trying to tie it to scotch-irish immigration doesn't cut it.
 

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WJC

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i posted evidence from a prestigious southern publication, and there are others, that southerners contemporary with the civil war thought of themselves as cavaliers . this is evidenced by the fact that post war southern organizations tended to represent themselves as "Knights of So-and-So Order". the south is known for it's chivalrous manners.
the roundheads or "saxons" were the commoners and puritans of new england. so i am at a loss as to why some southerners insist on a anglo-saxon reference instead of a norman one.
Recall that the term 'Anglo-Saxon' was also used to distinguish those of British or northern European ancestry from people from southern or eastern Europe and people of color.
 

CSA Today

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well i said " i thought " but you can't really determine the sources. i am pretty sure of the petti part but on the mor or more part ...
It may also have been a nickname for someone of dark or swarthy complexion, deriving from the Old French "more", dark-skinned. There was also a personal name of the same origin, which was borne by several early saints. The given name was introduced into England by the Normans, but was never as popular in England as on the Continent. In Ireland the surname originated as an Anglicized form of the Gaelic "O'Mordha", composed of the elements "O", descendant of, with "Mordha", a byname meaning great, proud, or stately. In Scotland and Wales it was a nickname for a large man, deriving from the Gaelic "mor", Welsh "mowr", big, great.
anyway lowland scots have their origins as celts but have become much intermingled with many other peoples of different ethnic origins.
nobody has , unless i missed it, given any evidence that the south was primarily of anglo-saxon decent. trying to tie it to scotch-irish immigration doesn't cut it.
That would have been --- duin
 

matthew mckeon

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We seem to be wandering a bit. Interesting and all, but not sure of its connection with the thread OP or the Civil War in general.
 

OpnCoronet

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The Brits thought, and many still do, that they are superior to everybody else. No news here.



Mostly true. But, the fact seldom has to be mentioned in public. It is one of those assumtions of faith, that needs no verification by other peoples to agree with their assumtion. Unlike America, where the faith was less secure and needed the rest of the world to agree.
 

Henry Brown

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this guy seems to be saying that the south is celtic in general but due to the anglo-saxon, ulster scot, norman , and french influences prefers the term southerner although he uses anglo as a prefix for other ethnic designations.

https://www.abbevilleinstitute.org/blog/is-the-south-celtic/

excerpt:
There is a popular theme embraced by many that the uniqueness of Southern culture is explained by its “Celtic” origins in opposition to the “Anglo-Saxon” foundations of the North. This thesis has been expressed strongly in such works as Grady McWhiney’s Cracker Culture: Celtic Ways in the Old South, Jim Webb’s Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America, and James P. Cantrell’s How Celtic Culture Invented Southern Literature.
 
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Because we don't make it in England- now you have declared war on Scotland !
Negative. I love Scotch but Scotchmen ain't English men per my good friend Mel Gibson. Just sayin if the Irish, Scots, Japanese, Taiwanese. and Americans can make great whiskey then why can't the English ? I only tried Kirkland Canadian whiskey and its ok with ginger ale. I know other nations are also geting into the whiskey game. One would think that in tje last 1000 years the English would make whiskey but apparently they don't or their whiskey is not good enough to export.
A truly great nation can distill good whiskey.
Although the English make great beer we can make their beer even better here in beautiful scenic Van Nuys, California at Mcleouds brewery.
Leftyhunter
 

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this guy seems to be saying that the south is celtic in general but due to the anglo-saxon, ulster scot, norman , and french influences prefers the term southerner although he uses anglo as a prefix for other ethnic designations.

https://www.abbevilleinstitute.org/blog/is-the-south-celtic/

excerpt:
There is a popular theme embraced by many that the uniqueness of Southern culture is explained by its “Celtic” origins in opposition to the “Anglo-Saxon” foundations of the North. This thesis has been expressed strongly in such works as Grady McWhiney’s Cracker Culture: Celtic Ways in the Old South, Jim Webb’s Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America, and James P. Cantrell’s How Celtic Culture Invented Southern Literature.
Sorry, not likely to take anything from Clyde Wilson seriously.
https://www.abbevilleinstitute.org/blog/is-the-south-celtic/
 

Pat Young

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Wilson's motive for his article is expressed here:

My real concern is this. Dwelling on the Celtic theme is dividing and undermining the South. Once we have established that the South is defined as Celtic, what have we accomplished? We have excised Southern and substituted Celtic. Our enemies could not ask for anything more. To claim that the real South is “Celtic” is to say, as Webb and Cantrell do, that genteel Anglo-Southerners are inimical to and different from Celtic Southerners. This is wrong historically and factually, but more important it divides up Dixie at the time it needs to be united in a revived self-identification.

He is concerned with the development of a white Southern ethnostate. Please note that his definition of Southerner follows the classic white nationalist path of excluding black people. Not sure how he views folks who moved to Atlanta from Chicago either.
 
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Sorry, not likely to take anything from Clyde Wilson seriously.
Wilson's motive for his article is expressed here:

My real concern is this. Dwelling on the Celtic theme is dividing and undermining the South. Once we have established that the South is defined as Celtic, what have we accomplished? We have excised Southern and substituted Celtic. Our enemies could not ask for anything more. To claim that the real South is “Celtic” is to say, as Webb and Cantrell do, that genteel Anglo-Southerners are inimical to and different from Celtic Southerners. This is wrong historically and factually, but more important it divides up Dixie at the time it needs to be united in a revived self-identification.

He is concerned with the development of a white Southern ethnostate. Please note that his definition of Southerner follows the classic white nationalist path of excluding black people. Not sure how he views folks who moved to Atlanta from Chicago either.
i was about to send you a pm titled WHY? :thumbsup:
 



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