The little guys.

drm2m

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 22, 2010
Location
Quebec
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My only London Colt----with a story!
 
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drm2m

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 22, 2010
Location
Quebec
I received the cased London '49 Colt in trade for my M1A1 carbine on April 19 2013.

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JAMES SAMUEL WINTER AND THE COLT PISTOL

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When James Samuel Winter’s father, John Winter, died in Antigua in 1871, he was at sea or in England. He was unable to claim any part of the vast holdings belonging to his father, nor were the other children. It is assumed that there was no will and the children had no legal claim.

It is further assumed that the wife/mistress Ellen Horsford, in concert with her lawyer brother and local officials had re-located all moveable assets to the island of St Kitts.

During the period that James Samuel Winter was attempting to obtain satisfaction in the West Indies, he considered that his life was in danger and subsequently armed himself with a Colt pistol.

During William James Winter’s (the author of Winter Tale) trip to Antigua in 1991 the story was told of some sea captain arriving in Antigua after John Winter’s death in 1871 armed with a pistol and demanding his share of the estate. The unknown sea captain of course had to be James Samuel Winter, and the Colt pistol is the one obtained by William James Winter from his cousin Norman V.W. Griffiths in 1992.

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I found a great grandson in England who sent me the Death Certificate and Marriage Certificate for James Samuel Winter the owner of the Colt.

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Back in in April 2013 this young collector wanted to buy my M1A1 carbine---I told him it was not for sale----find me something interesting to trade----this is what he found.

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I contacted a family member in Antigua to try and get a photo of James Samuel Winter----no luck.
I finally gave up.
 
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Lubliner

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
I believe that young collector had his heart set on the M1A1 Carbine, no matter what. Along with the provenance of the Colt you have a good catch. Was there a story to the M1A1 you were able to share with the deal? I would like to hear it!
Thanks,
Lubliner.
 

Waterloo50

Major
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Location
England
I believe that young collector had his heart set on the M1A1 Carbine, no matter what. Along with the provenance of the Colt you have a good catch. Was there a story to the M1A1 you were able to share with the deal? I would like to hear it!
Thanks,
Lubliner.
I was thinking the same, I’m also wondering if that young collector was into reenactment, maybe WW2, Korea or Vietnam. Seems to me that younger people gravitate more to the modern wars for re-enactments, it certainly seems to be the case on this side of the pond.
 

drm2m

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 22, 2010
Location
Quebec
This is the story of the M1A1 carbine as per my notes.
I bought it in February 2008.

S/n 123829---This is an early “First Contract” carbine barrel dated 12-42.
This is a rare carbine and hard to find in the U.S. and Canada.
Walnut, high wood oil finished stock, flip rear sights, “Type 1” barrel band with “UI” marking on the swivel. (Wide swivel aperture.)
“P” proof code in a circle on the rear of the stock above the pistol grip by the recoil plate.

On the underside of the pistol grip there is a stamped faint Ordnance ”crossed cannons” escutcheon with what looks like an “O” as in “IO” for Overton /Inland.
There is a visible “OI” stamp on the underside of the forearm.
There may be a faint “OI” very faintly stamped on the bottom inside of the stock.
On the inside of the buttplate there is a number cast (not stamped) “B257654” followed by a circled asterisk-like number with a one or two digit number.
The number looks a “10”.
The gun came with an “IA” Inland marked magazine that has been pinned to five rounds.

Barrel Markings;
–Inland Mfg Div General Motors, 12-42.
Receiver Markings;
Front of receiver-“U.S Carbine” ”Cal. 30 M1”—Behind rear flip leaf sight “Inland Div” over serial number 123829.
Hammer Marking; “HI” Inland code.
Trigger Housing;
The Inland Logo is stamped on the right side of the trigger housing.
There was approx. 140,000 of this model produced by Inland in two distinct production runs. Inland was the only manufacturer of this model.

First run in November 1942 through October 1943 approx. 71,000 guns.
Second run began to be manufactured in April of 1944 with the first deliveries in May 44 through December 1944 approx. 69,000.

The second run carbines had low wood stocks, adjustable rear sights, and”T4” barrel bands late in the production run.
This carbine is an early gun from the “first run.”
These guns are rare and very highly sought after by M1 carbine collectors.
The gun remains in its “as issued” configuration, and has no post war modifications; it came with its original early khaki coloured sling.
After the war, like the standard M1 carbines, most of the M1A1 carbines were overhauled with updated and/or refurbished parts.
This is not the case with this gun; it remains in its original configuration.

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The same young collector wants my Colt M1911A1 rig---although he has a bunch of these.

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