The Corwin Amendment

danny

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Feb 20, 2005
Location
Hattiesburg
6 states ratified.
Kentucky, Maryland and Virginia are not yankee at all.
Illinois was hardly "hardcore" and only marginally Yankee.
I feel the same way about Ohio
And as a Massachusetts native, I consider Rhode Island to be wannabe Yankees.

No way it would get enough states to be adopted.
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Dead Parrott

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Jul 30, 2019
Lincoln wanted to draw the fire of confederate guns that were guarding Charleston Harbor, so he sent a small armada of warships to menace the coastline of South Carolina. Lincoln was the aggressor in that engagement and the shots fired at Fort Sumter were shots fired in self-defense.

Just like when my neighbor claimed independence from the city, and took over the utility pole in front of his house. When the police showed up, he said his shots were only fired 'in self-defense'.
...worked out about as well for him as it did for the CSA... :wavespin:
 
Fun fact! The Corwin Amendment was never officially withdrawn so it could still technically be ratified today. Maryland rescinded its ratification in 2014. Someone in the Texas legislature even tried resubmitting it for ratification in 1963 without luck.
Coleman v. Miller, 307 U.S. 433 (1939) ruled that if Congress did not set a deadline for ratification on a given amendment, then the amendment remains pending. As of this date 3 amendments are awaiting ratification by 3/4 of the states; the Congressional Apportionment Amendment passed by Congress in 1789, the Titles of Nobility Amendment passed in 1810 and the Corwin Amendment passed in 1861.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
6 states ratified.
Kentucky, Maryland and Virginia are not yankee at all.
Illinois was hardly "hardcore" and only marginally Yankee.
I feel the same way about Ohio
And as a Massachusetts native, I consider Rhode Island to be wannabe Yankees.

No way it would get enough states to be adopted.
Both Ohio and Illinois were very dependent on trade using the Mississippi River so would be very interested in keeping the river in United States hands. I am not surprised they would go to great lengths to keep the South from seceding. But would other northern states have ratified the Ammendment?
 

Zack

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Joined
Aug 20, 2017
Location
Los Angeles, California
I think it's also worth noting that the Senate passed the Corwin Amendment in the early hours of Monday, March 4, 1861. Half the senators were "asleep on the sofas, and some in their seats" according to a reporter for Harper's Weekly. "Repeated motions for a recess were made" the reporter added, but Stephen Douglas refused to end the debate. It passed around 5:20am with 24 ayes and 12 nays.

No one really cared. It didn't make the papers that Monday. It was barely mentioned the next day.

All eyes were too focused on the OTHER big event of March 4, 1861.....

Abraham_Lincoln_inauguration_1861.jpg
 

Zack

Sergeant
Joined
Aug 20, 2017
Location
Los Angeles, California
I'd also be curious to see how the Corwin Amendment fit in with the Crittenden Compromise, the better known of the efforts to avert war by enshrining slavery.

If I recall correctly, Lincoln and the Republicans opposed the Crittenden Compromise as it did not block the spread of slavery.

It becomes clear, I think, from a rough timeline how the Corwin Amendment was largely swept aside by onrushing events.

Rough Timeline:
December 18, 1860 - Crittenden Compromise proposed
December 20, 1860 - South Carolina secedes
December 26, 1860 - Major Robert Anderson moves his garrison from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter
December 31, 1860 - Crittenden Compromise tabled as it did not stop the spread of slavery to the territories and was thus unpalatable to Republicans.
January 9, 1861 - Mississippi secedes. The Star of the West is fired on while attempting to deliver supplies to Fort Sumter.
January 10, 1861 - Florida secedes
January 11, 1861 - Alabama secedes
January 14, 1861 - A House committee chaired by Thomas Corwin calls for an amendment to protect slavery
January 19, 1861 - Georgia secedes
January 26, 1861 - Louisiana secedes
February 1, 1861 - Texas secedes
February 4, 1861 - The Peace Conference of 1861 convenes; the Crittenden Compromise is brought up at the conference. It is rejected again for the same reasons. That same day, the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States is formed.
February 8, 1861 - Provisional Constitution adopted by the Provisional Confederate Congress
February 18, 1861 - Jefferson Davis inaugurated President of the Provisional Confederate Government
February 26, 1861 - Corwin submits his own version of the amendment but it is not adopted
February 27, 1861 - The House fails to pass the original resolution protecting slavery; the Peace Conference adjourns having accomplished nothing.
February 28, 1861 - The House passes Corwin's version of the Amendment, which heads to the Senate
March 2, 1861 - The Senate begins debate of Corwin's version of the Amendment
March 4, 1861 - The Senate passes Corwin's version; Lincoln is inaugurated
March 11, 1861 - Permanent Confederate Constitution adopted, though it does not take effect until February 1862
March 16, 1861 - Lincoln sends the Corwin Amendment to each state for ratification, including those that had already seceded.
April 4, 1861 - Kentucky ratifies the Corwin Amendment

No other state ratified it before the firing on Fort Sumter.
 
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Dead Parrott

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 30, 2019
I'd also be curious to see how the Corwin Amendment fit in with the Crittenden Compromise, the better known of the efforts to avert war by enshrining slavery.

If I recall correctly, Lincoln and the Republicans opposed the Crittenden Compromise as it did not block the spread of slavery.

It becomes clear, I think, from a rough timeline how the Corwin Amendment was largely swept aside by onrushing events.

Rough Timeline:
December 18, 1860 - Crittenden Compromise proposed
December 20, 1860 - South Carolina secedes
December 26, 1860 - Major Robert Anderson moves his garrison from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter
December 31, 1860 - Crittenden Compromise tabled as it did not stop the spread of slavery to the territories and was thus unpalatable to Republicans.
January 9, 1861 - Mississippi secedes. The Star of the West is fired on while attempting to deliver supplies to Fort Sumter.
January 10, 1861 - Florida secedes
January 11, 1861 - Alabama secedes
January 14, 1861 - A House committee chaired by Thomas Corwin calls for an amendment to protect slavery
January 19, 1861 - Georgia secedes
January 26, 1861 - Louisiana secedes
February 1, 1861 - Texas secedes
February 4, 1861 - The Peace Conference of 1861 convenes; the Crittenden Compromise is brought up at the conference. It is rejected again for the same reasons. That same day, the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States is formed.
February 8, 1861 - Provisional Constitution adopted by the Provisional Confederate Congress
February 18, 1861 - Jefferson Davis inaugurated President of the Provisional Confederate Government
February 26, 1861 - Corwin submits his own version of the amendment but it is not adopted
February 27, 1861 - The House fails to pass the original resolution protecting slavery; the Peace Conference adjourns having accomplished nothing.
February 28, 1861 - The House passes Corwin's version of the Amendment, which heads to the Senate
March 2, 1861 - The Senate begins debate of Corwin's version of the Amendment
March 4, 1861 - The Senate passes Corwin's version; Lincoln is inaugurated
March 11, 1861 - Permanent Confederate Constitution adopted, though it does not take effect until February 1862
March 16, 1861 - Lincoln sends the Corwin Amendment to each state for ratification, including those that had already seceded.
April 4, 1861 - Kentucky ratifies the Corwin Amendment

No other state ratified it before the firing on Fort Sumter.

Agreed. Too little, too late, and almost comic-tragic in it's poor timing.
"I'll burn my books! Ah, Mephistopheles!" 😈
 
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