Stone Mountain Half Dollar

Viper21

Brigadier General
Moderator
Silver Patron
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
The following pictures are of my, 1925 Stone Mountain Coin. I could be wrong, but something tells me, these coins are going to be worth a lot more in the coming years.

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Here's NGC's description:

The 1925 Stone Mountain half dollar was struck to help raise funds for the completion of the massive carving honoring Southern Civil War heroes at Stone Mountain, Georgia. The project, which began in 1916, was plagued by numerous interruptions. In fact, it wasn’t until 1970 that the project was actually completed, and that was only after the State of Georgia intervened.

However, by the mid 1920’s, with the hope of finishing the project in a timely manner still alive, the Stone Mountain Confederate Monumental Association decided to raise funds for the project via a commemorative coin. With strong support for the project from President Calvin Coolidge, a bill was easily passed on March 17th, 1924 authorizing the minting of up to 5 million half dollars in commemoration of the soldiers of the South. The models for the coin were furnished by Stone Mountain’s original sculptor Gutzon Borglum, who was fired soon after due to many disagreements with the Association. Still, his heavily modified designs were eventually approved on October 10, 1924.

Borglum’s obverse features Confederate war heroes Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson on horseback. Above them is the motto IN GOD WE TRUST. Below to their left is STONE MOUNTAIN and the date, 1925. The reverse features a stoic eagle perched on a rock surrounded by a multitude of text. Above the eagle around the periphery are UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM. To its left is the inscription MEMORIAL TO THE VALOR OF THE SOLDIER OF THE SOUTH. LIBERTY and HALF DOLLAR can be found below.

The Association was clearly naively optimistic with their maximum mintage of 5 million coins. Less than half of that max mintage was actually coined, to the sum of 2,310,000 pieces. These were offered at $1 each. Some were even counter stamped with the initials of various southern states with a range of serial numbers and then auctioned off to the highest bidder. Even with that special marketing ploy, sales lagged behind. One million coins eventually ended up in the smelter, leaving a net mintage of 1,310,000 pieces. Even this proved too high, however, and many of those were released into circulation at face value.


The NGC site, has additional information, their price guide, & census numbers of the coins they've graded. NGC has graded 9,377 of them. That's not very many considering there were 1,310,000 printed. I realize that PCGS has graded some, & probably some of the other lesser knowns as well. I prefer NGC for myself which is why I've included their information.

I think they are awesome coins. I'd like to have a graded one, in the high 60's. Does anybody else have one of these coins...?
 

Viper21

Brigadier General
Moderator
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Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
I have several and one in mint state what ever that number is they give them. @Viper21 I'll give you a dollar for it :D
MS 68. NGC has only graded 15 of them with that grade, which is also the highest grade they've given. They've graded nearly 200 of them as 67 or 67+. There's a BIG difference in value from those compared to 68. They list a 68 (again the highest grade), as worth $15,000. For conversation, they list a 67 as worth, $850.

Yeah, mine ain't for sale..lol. I'd like to acquire a few more of them myself... :cool:
 

Viper21

Brigadier General
Moderator
Silver Patron
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
I have several and one in mint state what ever that number is they give them. @Viper21 I'll give you a dollar for it :D
While drinking my coffee this morning, I was reviewing this thread. I thought that my post about mint state 68 (MS68) might be misleading. ms68 is the highest grade NGC has given to any of these coins. There are other grades that fall into the "Mint State" category. MS is any coin they grade, with a grade of 60 or higher. The scale tops out at 70 for a perfect coin.

Having said that, there is a HUGE difference in coin values even just in the top of the scale say, in the 60's. I didn't want to mislead you into thinking you had a coin worth $15,000 when in fact, your coin may only be worth $75 - $80. MS61 = $77 MS62 = $83

Grading methods, & explanations from NGC can be found here: https://www.ngccoin.com/coin-grading/grading-scale/

I am a coin collector. Have been most of my life to some level. I've bought & sold hundreds, if not a couple thousand coins over the years. Other than a handful of specialty coins (like this one), I generally only buy NGC graded coins, & typically only buy the highest grade available. For reference, most of my individually graded coins are, PF70 coins.

At one time, I had a complete collection (silver & clad) of the State Quarters (1999-2008). All in PF70 Ultra Cameo. One of those quarters was exceptionally valuable for a few years, the Silver Delaware quarter in PF70. The highest price paid for one was $17,250 (2007). Unfortunately for whoever paid that, the price slowly dropped as more of them were graded with that grade. That same coin can be purchased in the hundreds today. I'm certainly glad I sold mine when I did.
 

Dave DuBrucq

Corporal
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Location
Tennessee
The following pictures are of my, 1925 Stone Mountain Coin. I could be wrong, but something tells me, these coins are going to be worth a lot more in the coming years.

View attachment 386786

View attachment 386787

Here's NGC's description:

The 1925 Stone Mountain half dollar was struck to help raise funds for the completion of the massive carving honoring Southern Civil War heroes at Stone Mountain, Georgia. The project, which began in 1916, was plagued by numerous interruptions. In fact, it wasn’t until 1970 that the project was actually completed, and that was only after the State of Georgia intervened.

However, by the mid 1920’s, with the hope of finishing the project in a timely manner still alive, the Stone Mountain Confederate Monumental Association decided to raise funds for the project via a commemorative coin. With strong support for the project from President Calvin Coolidge, a bill was easily passed on March 17th, 1924 authorizing the minting of up to 5 million half dollars in commemoration of the soldiers of the South. The models for the coin were furnished by Stone Mountain’s original sculptor Gutzon Borglum, who was fired soon after due to many disagreements with the Association. Still, his heavily modified designs were eventually approved on October 10, 1924.

Borglum’s obverse features Confederate war heroes Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson on horseback. Above them is the motto IN GOD WE TRUST. Below to their left is STONE MOUNTAIN and the date, 1925. The reverse features a stoic eagle perched on a rock surrounded by a multitude of text. Above the eagle around the periphery are UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM. To its left is the inscription MEMORIAL TO THE VALOR OF THE SOLDIER OF THE SOUTH. LIBERTY and HALF DOLLAR can be found below.

The Association was clearly naively optimistic with their maximum mintage of 5 million coins. Less than half of that max mintage was actually coined, to the sum of 2,310,000 pieces. These were offered at $1 each. Some were even counter stamped with the initials of various southern states with a range of serial numbers and then auctioned off to the highest bidder. Even with that special marketing ploy, sales lagged behind. One million coins eventually ended up in the smelter, leaving a net mintage of 1,310,000 pieces. Even this proved too high, however, and many of those were released into circulation at face value.


The NGC site, has additional information, their price guide, & census numbers of the coins they've graded. NGC has graded 9,377 of them. That's not very many considering there were 1,310,000 printed. I realize that PCGS has graded some, & probably some of the other lesser knowns as well. I prefer NGC for myself which is why I've included their information.

I think they are awesome coins. I'd like to have a graded one, in the high 60's. Does anybody else have one of these coins...?
I have seen only one of these coins. I agree that it would be wise to hold on to it. The value is very likely to increase, but beyond that, it is an historical treasure. Do you have any idea of how many of these were minted?
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
During my Christmas shopping at the local antique mall, I saw one of these. I wanted to go home and research it before I considered buying it. I thought the price tag was $8.50.
I googled and learned about it and got excited at this great price. Turned out the tag really stated $85.

I didnt get it. I was satisfied with the sterling silver British officer’s Gordon Highlander cap badge I got for $50.
 
I have seen only one of these coins. I agree that it would be wise to hold on to it. The value is very likely to increase, but beyond that, it is an historical treasure. Do you have any idea of how many of these were minted?
1,310,000 were minted according to:
 

KianGaf

Sergeant
Joined
May 29, 2019
Location
Dublin, Ireland
The following pictures are of my, 1925 Stone Mountain Coin. I could be wrong, but something tells me, these coins are going to be worth a lot more in the coming years.

View attachment 386786

View attachment 386787

Here's NGC's description:

The 1925 Stone Mountain half dollar was struck to help raise funds for the completion of the massive carving honoring Southern Civil War heroes at Stone Mountain, Georgia. The project, which began in 1916, was plagued by numerous interruptions. In fact, it wasn’t until 1970 that the project was actually completed, and that was only after the State of Georgia intervened.

However, by the mid 1920’s, with the hope of finishing the project in a timely manner still alive, the Stone Mountain Confederate Monumental Association decided to raise funds for the project via a commemorative coin. With strong support for the project from President Calvin Coolidge, a bill was easily passed on March 17th, 1924 authorizing the minting of up to 5 million half dollars in commemoration of the soldiers of the South. The models for the coin were furnished by Stone Mountain’s original sculptor Gutzon Borglum, who was fired soon after due to many disagreements with the Association. Still, his heavily modified designs were eventually approved on October 10, 1924.

Borglum’s obverse features Confederate war heroes Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson on horseback. Above them is the motto IN GOD WE TRUST. Below to their left is STONE MOUNTAIN and the date, 1925. The reverse features a stoic eagle perched on a rock surrounded by a multitude of text. Above the eagle around the periphery are UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM. To its left is the inscription MEMORIAL TO THE VALOR OF THE SOLDIER OF THE SOUTH. LIBERTY and HALF DOLLAR can be found below.

The Association was clearly naively optimistic with their maximum mintage of 5 million coins. Less than half of that max mintage was actually coined, to the sum of 2,310,000 pieces. These were offered at $1 each. Some were even counter stamped with the initials of various southern states with a range of serial numbers and then auctioned off to the highest bidder. Even with that special marketing ploy, sales lagged behind. One million coins eventually ended up in the smelter, leaving a net mintage of 1,310,000 pieces. Even this proved too high, however, and many of those were released into circulation at face value.


The NGC site, has additional information, their price guide, & census numbers of the coins they've graded. NGC has graded 9,377 of them. That's not very many considering there were 1,310,000 printed. I realize that PCGS has graded some, & probably some of the other lesser knowns as well. I prefer NGC for myself which is why I've included their information.

I think they are awesome coins. I'd like to have a graded one, in the high 60's. Does anybody else have one of these coins...?
I had a look on eBay a MS64 was going for $150.
 
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