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jgoodguy

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#5
Randolph Harrison McKim, 1842-1920
A Soldier's Recollections: Leaves from the Diary of a Young Confederate: With an Oration on the Motives and Aims of the Soldiers of the South.
New York: Longmans, Green and Co., 1910.

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THE REV. RANDOLPH H. McKIM, D.D. 1904

Linkee
 
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#6
Randolph Harrison McKim, 1842-1920
A Soldier's Recollections: Leaves from the Diary of a Young Confederate: With an Oration on the Motives and Aims of the Soldiers of the South.
New York: Longmans, Green and Co., 1910.

Previous illustration
THE REV. RANDOLPH H. McKIM, D.D. 1904

Linkee
Thank you! It appears as if the above is NOT the musings of a “young Confederate” in his diary but rather the words of the author pushing his own agenda.

Nothing to see here, moving on.
 

Drew

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#7
Randolph Harrison McKim, 1842-1920
A Soldier's Recollections: Leaves from the Diary of a Young Confederate: With an Oration on the Motives and Aims of the Soldiers of the South.
New York: Longmans, Green and Co., 1910.

Previous illustration
THE REV. RANDOLPH H. McKIM, D.D. 1904

Linkee
Thank you for posting the full, primary source. It's notable it was published by Longmans, Green & Company of New York.

The North's pecuniary interest in the so-called, "Lost Cause" is notable. As usual, they were primarily interested in lining their own pockets.

I've copied below from the author's introduction:

"One closing word as to the spirit in which I have undertaken this modest contribution to the literature of the Civil War. I am not, in these pages, brooding over the ashes of the past. The soldiers of the Southern Cross have long ago bowed to the decree of Almighty God in the issue of the great conflict. His will is wiser and better than ours. We thank God that to-day the sun shines on a truly reunited country. We love our Southland; we are Southern men; but we are glad that sectionalism is dead and buried, and we claim our full part in working out the great destiny that lies before the American people. We may not forget --we veterans of the Civil War--that the best of our life and work lies behind us: morituri salutamus. But whatever of life remains to us we have long ago dedicated to the service of our common country. We joyfully accept our share in the responsibilities, the opportunities, the strenuous conflicts, of the future, against foes within and without, for the moral and material glory of our country. We are Americans in every fibre; and nothing that pertains to the honor, to the welfare, to the glory, of America is foreign to us."

That sounds good to me, Reverend McKim.
 

cash

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#8

Drew

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#9
This doesn’t sound like the writings of a young Confederate... it sounds more like the well thought out diatribe of a Lost Cause writer. Very doubtful that this is actually taken from the “diary of a young Confederate.”
Randolph H. McKim is recorded as serving in the Confederate 2nd Virginia Cavalry by the U.S. National Park Service in its Soldier and Sailors Database. You can call him all the names you want, but he was there as a young man, unlike you and me.

https://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-soldiers.htm#q=McKim
 
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#10
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/55308874/randolph-harrison-mckim

Randolph Harrison McKim: Born 4/16/1842 in Baltimore, MD. Enlisted and mustered at age 18 on 4/15/1861 at Baltimore, MD as a Private into the "Maryland Southern Guards". This unit was disbanded on 7/1/1861. On 7/12/1861 he mustered into MD 1st Infantry. 1st Lieut 6/8/1862 (Aide-de-Camp to Gen George Steuart). On 8/23/1863 he was commissioned Chaplain into Field & Staff VA 2nd Cavalry. He was Surrendered on 4/9/1865 at Appomattox Court House, VA. Oath Allegiance 6/1/1865 Staunton, VA. Died 7/15/1920 in Bedford Springs, PA. Buried: Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, MD. (Attended Univ of VA. Postwar, Episcopal Minister Epithany Church, Washington, DC. Member Army & Navy Society, Md Line Assoc.) After the War he lived in Washington, DC.
Sources :
- The Virginia Regimental Histories Series
- Confederate Veteran Magazine
 

jgoodguy

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#11
Thank you for posting the full, primary source. It's notable it was published by Longmans, Green & Company of New York.

The North's pecuniary interest in the so-called, "Lost Cause" is notable. As usual, they were primarily interested in lining their own pockets.

I've copied below from the author's introduction:

"One closing word as to the spirit in which I have undertaken this modest contribution to the literature of the Civil War. I am not, in these pages, brooding over the ashes of the past. The soldiers of the Southern Cross have long ago bowed to the decree of Almighty God in the issue of the great conflict. His will is wiser and better than ours. We thank God that to-day the sun shines on a truly reunited country. We love our Southland; we are Southern men; but we are glad that sectionalism is dead and buried, and we claim our full part in working out the great destiny that lies before the American people. We may not forget --we veterans of the Civil War--that the best of our life and work lies behind us: morituri salutamus. But whatever of life remains to us we have long ago dedicated to the service of our common country. We joyfully accept our share in the responsibilities, the opportunities, the strenuous conflicts, of the future, against foes within and without, for the moral and material glory of our country. We are Americans in every fibre; and nothing that pertains to the honor, to the welfare, to the glory, of America is foreign to us."

That sounds good to me, Reverend McKim.
I suppose one opinion deserves another.
 

jgoodguy

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#12

John Hartwell

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#13
Thank you for posting the full, primary source. It's notable it was published by Longmans, Green & Company of New York.

The North's pecuniary interest in the so-called, "Lost Cause" is notable. As usual, they were primarily interested in lining their own pockets.
Nothing there about "the North." It's Longmans, Green & Co's "pecuniary interest" at issue.

Edited.
 

wbull1

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#17
If memory serves me, I believe Robert E. Lee fought for the state of Virginia; not for or against slavery. And Davis, as a military man, could foresee the likely military outcome of the war. In January 1861, soon-to-be Confederate President Jefferson Davis said his state had seceded because “she had heard proclaimed the theory that all men are created free and equal, and this made the basis of an attack upon her social institutions; and the sacred Declaration of Independence had been invoked to maintain the position of the equality of the races.” Both men were well aware of the reasons given in the statements made about why states seceded from the Union by the states that seceded. Whatever their personal beliefs, they had no doubt about the reason for secession as stated also by other leaders.
Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens similarly said that “slavery…was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution “ and that protecting it was the “cornerstone” the new Confederate government.
 

WJC

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#18
***Posted as Moderator***
This thread solicits opinions on comments about slavery's role in secession and war in an early 20th-century book by a Confederate veteran.
Please discuss this in a civil manner respecting the opinions of our fellow members. If you can't, don't post here!
 

Borderruffian

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#19
This doesn’t sound like the writings of a young Confederate... it sounds more like the well thought out diatribe of a Lost Cause writer. Very doubtful that this is actually taken from the “diary of a young Confederate.”
an wy is at? does you thank ever one o them yong confedirat boys was thout that thar propar shcoolin that them yanke boys got up air in thr noth?
 

jgoodguy

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#20



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