LRT framed by Devils Dens


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Lubliner

First Sergeant
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Nov 27, 2018
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Chattanooga, Tennessee
This got me thinking of the idle time that sets in after a terrible fury, and wondered how many soldiers holding their position took the time to carve into the rock faces surrounding them. Do any at all exist?
Lubliner.
 

infomanpa

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Feb 18, 2017
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Location
Pennsylvania
This got me thinking of the idle time that sets in after a terrible fury, and wondered how many soldiers holding their position took the time to carve into the rock faces surrounding them. Do any at all exist?
Lubliner.
From the book on Devil's Den that I just read, it is my impression that any carvings that survive on the rocks were either placed there pre-war by townspeople or post-war by veterans. I don't believe that any were left during the couple days that the rocks were occupied.
 

lelliott19

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how many soldiers holding their position took the time to carve into the rock faces surrounding them. Do any at all exist?
Here's a whole thread of rock carvings at Gettysburg. There's actually a 4th Maine carving w/ third corps insignia and the 40th New York rock in Plum Run Valley, Devil's Den area. I dont know if they are contemporary or post-war. Anyway, its an interesting thread from 2012 you might enjoy. https://civilwartalk.com/threads/the-rock-carvings-of-gettysburg.78501/
 

Lubliner

First Sergeant
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Nov 27, 2018
Messages
1,234
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
From the book on Devil's Den that I just read, it is my impression that any carvings that survive on the rocks were either placed there pre-war by townspeople or post-war by veterans. I don't believe that any were left during the couple days that the rocks were occupied.
In effect, I had watched a video at some earlier point on WWII in Europe, and a discussion of "Kilroy was here" had made a brief appearance, beginning in Italy if I remember correctly. I can also recall the graffiti left behind by the explorers heading west, and numerous times names have been written in caves, some dates in line with the Civil War. And @lelliott19 the thread you point to is just a magnificent opportunity to recall later what I ventured to find on July 4th, our Independence Day. Thank you so much for your helpfulness.
Lubliner.
 

infomanpa

First Sergeant
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Feb 18, 2017
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Location
Pennsylvania

infomanpa

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
1,640
Location
Pennsylvania
Hoping for the good weather you had for your photo over the weekend. We're arriving Gettysburg Friday noonish.
Going to the reenactment? The worst weather there during the anniversary days was a high wind/rain storm at about 6:30 on July 2 during a battle walk with a couple hundred people. Many of them (including us) took cover in the Pennsylvania Memorial.
 

Wallyfish

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Joined
Nov 26, 2015
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1,349
Location
Greensburg, Pa
If memory serves me correct the DA rock carving was carved within two days of his death on July 2, 1863. DA is for Captain David Acheson of the 140th Pa. Post battle, 140th C Veterans returned to the rock. They deepened the previously carved DA and they added the 140 PV to the rock below the DA.

His family located his remains based on the carving and reinterred him back in Washington, Pa around 10 days after he was killed.

There is a recent post here on how to find his rock carving. It is the only rock carving (only the DA portion) that can be attributed to the actual battle time period. Between rock carvings, witness trees, historic buildings, the unique Gettysburg geology and of course the battle itself makes Gettysburg a fascinating place to visit. JD Petruzzi's excellent Gettysburg Guide has a chapter on rock carvings with how to find verbiage.
 

Garandguy

Private
Joined
Jun 23, 2019
Messages
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I went all over Devil's Den this past 2018 using all the latest info about rock carvings, historic photo's, etc. It's a place of power, no matter how you slice it...you get chills as the sun goes down, looking up to Little and Big Round Top...
 

Tom Elmore

Sergeant Major
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Jan 16, 2015
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2,411
If memory serves me correct the DA rock carving was carved within two days of his death on July 2, 1863. DA is for Captain David Acheson of the 140th Pa. Post battle, 140th C Veterans returned to the rock. They deepened the previously carved DA and they added the 140 PV to the rock below the DA.

His family located his remains based on the carving and reinterred him back in Washington, Pa around 10 days after he was killed.

There is a recent post here on how to find his rock carving. It is the only rock carving (only the DA portion) that can be attributed to the actual battle time period. Between rock carvings, witness trees, historic buildings, the unique Gettysburg geology and of course the battle itself makes Gettysburg a fascinating place to visit. JD Petruzzi's excellent Gettysburg Guide has a chapter on rock carvings with how to find verbiage.
During the time of the battle there was an "X" carved into a rock that marked the graves of two Confederate artillerymen in Captain Watson's battery. I found the following rock in the vicinity that appears to be a candidate:
GettysburgXrockA.JPG
 


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