★★★ Lee, Robert Edward

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gentlemanrob

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Robert Edward Lee
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Robert Edward Lee was a soldier from Virginia who first served in the U.S. Army, until his home state seceded from the Union during the outbreak of the Civil War. Lee resigned from the U.S. Army in 1861 and joined the Confederate Army. He is best known for his command of the Army of Northern Virginia starting in 1862. His early record shows that he was an able tactician and battlefield commander, winning most of his battles, frequently besting Armies with Superior numbers.

At Gettysburg, by far the largest battle of the war, Lee suffered his greatest defeat. It has been suggested that Lee's principle change to offensive tactics resulted in higher casualties than his army could afford. Although the war continued on for nearly two more years, Lee was compelled to surrender to Union forces under the command of U.S. General Grant at Appomattox in April of 1865, and all Confederate forces capitulated following Lee's actions.

Born: January 19, 1807

Birthplace: Stratford Hall, Westmoreland County, Virginia

Father: Major General Henry “Light Horse Harry” Lee 1756 – 1818
(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​

Mother: Anne Hill Carter 1773 – 1829
(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​

Wife: Mary Anna Randolph Custis 1808 – 1873
(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​
Married: June 30, 1831 in Arlington, Virginia

Children:

(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​
Mary Custis Lee 1835 – 1918​
(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​
(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​
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(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​
Eleanor Agnes Lee 1841 – 1873​
(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​
(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​
Mildred Childe Lee 1845 – 1905​
(Buried: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia)​

Education:

1829: Graduated from West Point Military Academy – (2nd in class)​

Occupation before War:

1829: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army Engineers​
1829 – 1836: 2nd Lt. United States Army Engineers​
1829 – 1834: Assistant Engineer for the Defense of Hampton Roads​
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1834 – 1837: Assistant to Chief Engineer in Washington, D.C.​
1836 – 1838: 1st Lt. United States Army Engineers​
1835: Assistant Astronomer for establishing Ohio Missouri Boundary​
1837 – 1841: Superintendent Engineer St. Louis Harbor Improvement​
1838 – 1855: Captain United States Army Engineers​
1840 – 1841: Engineer for improvement of Lower Mississippi​
1841 – 1844: Engineer for Repairs on Narrows at New York Harbor​
1844: Assistant to Chief Engineer in Washington, D.C.​
1844 – 1846: Engineer for Repairs on Narrows at New York Harbor​
1845 – 1848: Member Board of Engineers Atlantic Coast Defenses​
1847: Brevetted Major for his role at Battle of Cerro Gordo, Mexico​
1847: Brevetted Lt. Colonel for his role at Contreras & Churubusco​
1847: Brevetted Colonel for his role at Battle of Chapultepec​
1848 – 1852: Engineer for Construction of Fort Carroll in Maryland​
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1848 – 1852: Member Board of Engineers Atlantic Coast Defenses​
1852 – 1855: Superintendent of West Point Military Academy​
1855 – 1861: Lt. Colonel United States Army 2nd Cavalry​
1856: Frontier Duty at Camp Cooper Texas​
1856: Served in expedition against Comanche Indians​
1856 – 1857: Frontier Duty at Camp Cooper, Texas​
1857: Commanded regiment in San Antonio, Texas​
1857 – 1859: Leave of Absence from Army father in law’s death​
1859: Commander of forces at Harper’s Ferry to end John Brown’s raid​
1860: Commander of United States Army Department of Texas​
1861: Colonel of United States Army 1st Cavalry Regiment​
1861: Refused Command of Union Army Volunteers​
1861: Resigned from United States Army on April 25th​

Civil War Career:

1861: Commander of Virginia State Forces​
1861: Commander of Confederate Forces in Western Virginia​
1861: Defeated at the Battle of Cheat Mountain​
1861: Organizer of Coastal Defenses at Carolina and Georgia Coast​
1861 – 1865: General of Confederate States Army​
1861 – 1862: Military Advisor to President Jefferson Davis​
1862 – 1865: Commander of Army of Northern Virginia​
1862: Successful in his Command for Seven Days Campaign​
1862: Successful in his Command at Second Battle of Bull Run​
1862: Commander of single most bloody day Battle of Antietam, Md.​
1862: Commander of Confederate Army’s victory at Fredericksburg​
1863: Commander of Confederate Army’s Victory at Chancellorsville​
1863 – 1870: Suffered from bad health due to heart problem’s​
1863: Commander of Unsuccessful Attack at Gettysburg, PA​
1863: Submitted letter of resignation President refused to accept​
1864: Confederate Commander Battle of the Wilderness​
Lee 1869.jpg
1864: Confederate Commander Battle of Spotsylvania Court House​
1864: Commander of Confederate Army’s Victory at Cold Harbor​
1864 – 1865: Confederate Commander during Siege of Petersburg, VA​
1865: General in Chief of Armies of Confederate States​
1865: Abandoned Richmond and retreated West​
1865: made attempt to escape to the Southwest and Join Johnston​
1865: Surrendered to Grant on April 9th at Appomattox, Virginia​

Occupation after War:

1865: Went to Richmond Virginia to join his family​
1865: Told Southerners to stop fighting and return home​
1865: Lived at Derwent in Powhatan County, Virginia​
1865: Considered buying land and becoming a farmer​
1865 – 1870: President of Washington College​
Started an honor System at Washington College Similar to West Point’s​
Supporter of Andrew Johnson’s Plan for Reconstruction​
1870: Traveled South on Vacation​
1870: September 28th Suffered a Stroke in Lexington, Virginia​

Died: October 12, 1870

Time of Death: 9:00 AM

Cause of Death: Pneumonia

Age at time of Death: 63 years old

Burial Place: Lee Chapel Museum, Lexington, Virginia

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CivilWarTalk

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Parole of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee
and six of his staff officers, April 9, 1865.
(National Archives, Records of the Adjutant General s Office, 1780 s—1917, RG 94)

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Lee signed his Amnesty Oath on October 2, 1865,
but was not restored to full citizenship in his lifetime.
(General Records of the Department of State, RG 59)

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James N.

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All photos from Lee Chapel, Washington & Lee University, Lexington, Virginia.

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Above, Edward Valentine's Recumbent Statue of Lee; below, part of the Lee Family crypt.

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Lee's office as President of the then-college in the basement of the chapel.
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All photos from the Museum of the Civil War (formerly Museum of the Confederacy), Appomattox, Virginia:

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Above and below, sword, uniform coat, and gauntlets worn by Lee at Appomattox.

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Below, Lee's death mask:
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archieclement

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I find this fact very interesting and never knew this. Who was he assistant to? Was this separate from his army duties?
Apparently astronomer and assistant astronomer are simply surveying titles, and would assume would be applicable to surveying done by army engineers as well

gathering this notion from

 
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archieclement

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I find this fact very interesting and never knew this. Who was he assistant to? Was this separate from his army duties?
Heres two of the feats he is known for here, saving river navigation at St Louis then opening the Upper Mississippi to navigation by opening a channel in the Des Moines rapids at Keokuk


http://markgoodmansen.com/2016/01/lt-robert-e-lee-the-rapids-and-the-steamboat/

 

luinrina

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I find this fact very interesting and never knew this. Who was he assistant to? Was this separate from his army duties?
From Freeman's bio (Vol. I, p. 133/134):

The round of office work was pleasantly broken in the spring of 1835. The boundary between Ohio and the territory of Michigan was then in dispute. An armed clash between the two neighbors seemed not unlikely. Talcott had previously been employed in making a survey of the line in controversy, and in May, 1835, he was directed to make new observations to answer the rival contentions. "His old-time and able assistant, Lt. R. E. Lee of the Corps of Engineers" — in that gentleman's own bantering announcement to Mrs. Talcott — "will join him forthwith for same duty." The mission was not expected to take more than one month, but it occupied the entire summer. It involved a number of interesting calculations and it carried Lee to the Great Lakes, which he had never seen before. The tour of duty added little, however, to his equipment for the duties that lay ahead.​

Talcott being Andrew Talcott, West Point Class of 1818 (Cullum Register). He was Lee's superior at Ft. Monroe, and the Lees and Talcotts were very good friends. One of Talcott's sons, Thomas Mann Randolph Talcott, was on Lee's staff from 1862 to 1863.
 
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Curiosity has driven me to ask you who has climbed upon the roof and made their way to the chimney?
Thanks, Lubliner.
I hadn't noticed that before! I didn't get to go inside and was basically just walking around old downtown Alexandria looking for and snapping pictures of various historic sites. Probably he's working on the roof or something. I turned quickly from there to look across the street at another Lee property before crossing to the Episcopal Church where the Lees (and Washingtons too if I remember correctly) attended church; unfortunately, it too wasn't open to the public that weekday I was there.

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