Currency How many Confederate notes per sheet?

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Oct 8, 2021
Here is one that has the stamp on the front of the note.

T-64 1864 $500.jpg
 
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Sep 15, 2018
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That, to me, is above typical, the darker , reddish ink and the stamped corner add to it's "collectibility",assuming it's real. I don't have my list of fake serial numbers with me,so I'm assuming it is real.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2021
That, to me, is above typical, the darker , reddish ink and the stamped corner add to it's "collectibility",assuming it's real. I don't have my list of fake serial numbers with me,so I'm assuming it is real.

If you ever locate the 1864 $500 Confederate counterfeit note that was made back in 1864, it is rarer and more valuable than the genuine note. Of course the later knock-offs are worth nothing.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
If you ever locate the 1864 $500 Confederate counterfeit note that was made back in 1864, it is rarer and more valuable than the genuine note. Of course the later knock-offs are worth nothing.
I'm considering buying one of those cheap knock offs just to have something to hang on the wall until
l get the real thing.Most people wouldn't know the difference anyway.
 
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Joined
Oct 8, 2021
I'm considering buying one of those cheap knock offs just have something to hang on the wall until
l get the real thing.Most people wouldn't know the difference anyway.

You can acquire the real thing for short dolLars if it has problems. A deal had a number of them at one of Winter FUN numismatic shows. They were good enough to be framed, but not collector quality.

The $500, 1864 Confederate note is not very rare. The high prices are due to demand.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
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You can acquire the real thing for short dolLars if it has problems. A deal had a number of them at one of Winter FUN numismatic shows. They were good enough to be framed, but not collector quality.

The $500, 1864 Confederate note is not very rare. The high prices are due to demand.
I'm having a little problem understanding your first sentence. What are short dollars?
 
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Oct 8, 2021
I'm having a little problem understanding your first sentence. What are short dollars?

Nice ones will cost you $1,000 in AU with good colors. These notes come in shades ranging from light pick to dark pink, depending upon how much the ink was dilate. I am talking about wear and mishandling.

“Short dollars“ would be $100 to $200. These pieces have been mounted in albums, have thin spots in the paper or light stains. They can be made presentable in a frame.
 
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I am on the look out for a nice example but all too often any thing local is in not real good shape and the dealer wants to much. I don't know why they think they have some sort of collector's item.
 
There is something "different" about the bills with a serial number over 35,000 isn't there? Plus I think any bills under the serial # 20,000 were signed in brown ink instead of black weren't they?
Any Confederate note that was hand signed in Black Ink is a fake. All real Confederate notes that were hand signed were signed in brown ink although you will find some serial numbers done by hand in blue or red ink.
 
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Oct 8, 2021
I just go by what the latest book says. By this time, things were so chaotic for the Confederate Government, I doubt that anyone really knows how many of these notes were issued. The country was falling apart, and the money was becoming less valuable by the day. The fact that that they didn't have a enough ink to print it consistently tells you something.
 
According to the best current book on Civil War currency by Pierre Fricke, there were 154,000 of these $500 notes issued.
The records of all bonds and currency issued by the Confederate government from day one until its end were found after the War by Raphael P. Thian who was assigned to the Adjutant General's Office during and after the War. During July 1865, the U.S. Treasury Secretary ordered the creation of the Rebel Archives Bureau with Francis Lieber and his son Lt. Colonel Norman Lieber being put in charge. Thian was assigned to the Bureau and tasked with auditing the war-time assets of the Confederate Treasury and to come up with names of persons who had contributed money or cotton to the Treasury or purchased Confederate bonds, to be used as evidence of treason and aiding the rebellion. It was during Thian's audit that he uncovered the complete records of all bonds that were issued, the dates issued and the serial numbers of each bond as well as the signer of each bond. The records of "most" all Confederate currency, printed serial numbers and signatures "for Treasurer" and "for Register", was released in book form by Thian in 1880 entitled Register of Issues of Confederate States Treasury Notes.

Thian's records indicate that a total of 32,900 $500 Confederate "Stonewall" Jackson notes that were entered into Confederate Treasury records were issued under the Confederate Congress' Act of February 17, 1864, but he also notes that the issued serial number range of this denomination was higher by using asterisks in his records, but at the time Thian published his findings, the serial number range and the signatures who signed "for Register" and "for Treasurer" could not locate the records. For example, the $500 "Stonewall" note in post #22 with serial #35848 is not listed in Thian's records. Unsure if the records for the higher numbers were ever located.
 
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Joined
Oct 8, 2021
If the number issued was really roughly 1/5th of the number reported in that study, the piece would be a lot rarer today. Most any dealer, who has a stock of Confederate notes, will have at least one of these notes.
 
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Sep 15, 2018
Location
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There are threads and posts all through this forum concerning Confederate Money. I hope that someday all the info and tidbits can be contained into one or two. I have a heck of a time trying to find some wanted info when needed.
 
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