Currency How many Confederate notes per sheet?

TheRebelPatriot

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How many Confederate notes were printed per sheet?

In particular the 1864 $500 note with Stonewall on it?

I have a PMG graded VF30 1864 $500 note with a Treasury stamp on the back, upper corner. I know that there was only 1 stamp per sheet and was wondering how many notes were on each sheet?
 

TheRebelPatriot

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I have the 7th edition (1991) of Confederate Paper Money by Arlie R. Slabaugh. In it are these sentences...."73. $500, Feb. 17, 1864. Stonewall Jackson, Engraved by Keatinge & Ball. 4 notes in sheet. This is the rarest sheet presently known." And this one "It is entirely possible that other sheets may exist which have not as yet been reported, particularly of the 1864 issue when, due to the cutting apart of the Confederacy, it was not possible to deliver and issue all of the notes". So were there 8 or were there 4 notes to the sheet?Or did this book possibly have a typo, maybe?
 
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The book also contains this sentence in reference to this particular note. ..."Four varieties, plate letters A to D, 150,428 notes (incomplete data)". It also states that shades of pink vary and Red notes are usually higher. Is there really such thing as a red note or is it just a dark pink?
 

ucvrelics

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The color was all dependent on how much ink Keatinge and Ball had on had at the time of the run. They were NOT all run at the same time or same day.
 

Lubliner

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I myself prefer lower serial number notes, even if they aren't as red. Like mine, at 6164.
Were these notes individually signed? I see the one you own has a different name than the redder one shown. Also the print seems better defined in yours, especially in the embossed graphics. This may be due to the photo itself though.
Lubliner.
 

TheRebelPatriot

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Were these notes individually signed? I see the one you own has a different name than the redder one shown. Also the print seems better defined in yours, especially in the embossed graphics. This may be due to the photo itself though.
Lubliner.

Yes, they were all individually signed. And mine is a lower serial number and printed from Printing Plate A. The other photo is from Printing Plate D.

I've noticed that the ones from PP A are more defined and look better.
 

TheRebelPatriot

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Here's another one of the dark red varieties.

But it is also printed from plate A, like mine. And to me it has that more defined look.

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Were these notes individually signed? I see the one you own has a different name than the redder one shown. Also the print seems better defined in yours, especially in the embossed graphics. This may be due to the photo itself though.
Lubliner.
Women were assigned to the Confederate Treasury Department and their job was to sign every piece of Confederate currency that rolled off the presses, with the exception of the 50 Cent fractional note that had stamped signatures. Confederate currency required a signature "for Registar" and one "for Treasurer." The women who were assigned to one of these two groups were mainly the mothers, wives and daughters of soldiers who had been killed or severely wounded. The "signers" were given certain letter blocks and serial number ranges to affix their signatures to which were recorded by the Treasury Department. For example, on @TheRebelPatriot 's note in post #2 with plate letter A and serial #6164, J. C. Joplin was assigned to sign "For Treasurer" and W. Miller "For Register". Both of these signers were assigned to to sign all $500 notes with plate letters A thru D and serial numbers #1 thru 20,000.
 
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There was a most interesting thread on this topic last year titled The Confederacy's "Treasury Girls". On it was a link that is full of knowledge and information about the various signatures..https://civilwartalk.com/threads/women-working-in-csa-support-roles.146144/post-1819239
 
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