Restricted Henry Ward Beecher Quote

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“The negro is superior to the white race. If the latter do not forget their pride of race and color, and amalgamate with the purér and richer blood of the blacks, they will die out and wither away in unprolific skinniness.” - Henry Ward BeecherBF6FA5A2-2CAE-475F-A8E4-8B53DF74CB39.jpeg


I was shocked to recently discover that there were Caucasians that were that pro-Black even back even in the 1800’s.


“Books serve to show a man that those original thoughts of his aren't very new at all." - President Abraham Lincoln
 

byron ed

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So why do you think that? Maybe the author actually believed what he wrote.

Well he didn't just walk out of his front door one day and blurt out that quote. There was something before it and something after it. And he apparently wasn't above using sarcasm. Search "Henry Ward Beecher quotes." You'll get dozens, they are all clever with some a bit too clever.

But yes, maybe he did believe it exactly as he wrote it, and wasn't using it in the "suppose that..." sense. It's not as if abolitionists were known for being reasonable -- far from it -- they played a big part in inciting the Civil War with their always self-righteous, often deluded, and sometimes zany proclamations.
 
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John Hartwell

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Mr Beecher apparently spoke those words "from the pulpit." I've napped through enough sermons to know that every one of them should be taken literally, and at face value, without reference to the message it intends to convey. It is, after all, a simple, uncomplicated world, and simplistic conclusions are always best.
rsz_sarcasm - small.png
 
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I’m currently reading a book about Henry Ward Beecher. I’ve surprisingly never studied the history of abolitionists. I’m thinking they will be a new topic to research. Anyhow, from the little bit I’ve read, I can tell Mr. Beecher was like a lot of preachers. He was a showman and made people laugh. Perhaps his quote is one of the earliest recorded white people jokes. Or he could have meant it literally since he was quite clearly against slavery.
 

WJC

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I’ve surprisingly never studied the history of abolitionists. I’m thinking they will be a new topic to research.
You might enjoy Timothy P. McCarthy and John Stauffer, Prophets of Protest: Reconsidering the History of American Abolitionism. (New York: The New Press, 2006).
 
I do not know of a reputable source for this quote although it appears in a number of White Supremacist media. 'Caveat emptor'.

It also appears on the Wisconsin Historical Society site in a long pdf file claiming its from an 1866 speech given by Beecher but does not provide a link nor elaborate further.
 
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OpnCoronet

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“The negro is superior to the white race. If the latter do not forget their pride of race and color, and amalgamate with the purér and richer blood of the blacks, they will die out and wither away in unprolific skinniness.” - Henry Ward BeecherView attachment 328222
I was shocked to recently discover that there were Caucasians that were that pro-Black even back even in the 1800’s.



Although many of the so-called 'Radicals' were not nearly as radical as many at the time believed, they all bore the title radical from the thoughts and words of those sincere radicals such as Beecher.

Look up Thaddeus Stevens another sincere Radical in Congress at the time.
 

WJC

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It also appears on the Wisconsin Historical Society site in a long pdf file claiming its from an 1866 speech given by Beecher but does not provide a link nor elaborate further.
Thanks for your response.
Finally a possibly reliable source!
 
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WJC

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Although many of the so-called 'Radicals' were not nearly as radical as many at the time believed, they all bore the title radical from the thoughts and words of those sincere radicals such as Beecher.
As in any movement, the intensity of belief varied. One thing for sure: in the 19th Century, anyone who proposed equal rights for Blacks was likely to be called a "Radical": the idea truly was radical.
 

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It also appears on the Wisconsin Historical Society site in a long pdf file claiming its from an 1866 speech given by Beecher but does not provide a link nor elaborate further.
@Copperhead-mi, I could not open the file: can you give us the content that describes the Beecher statement? Thanks!
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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Well he didn't just walk out of his front door one day and blurt out that quote. There was something before it and something after it. And he apparently wasn't above using sarcasm. Search "Henry Ward Beecher quotes." You'll get dozens, they are all clever with some a bit too clever.

But yes, maybe he did believe it exactly as he wrote it, and wasn't using it in the "suppose that..." sense. It's not as if abolitionists were known for being reasonable -- far from it -- they played a big part in inciting the Civil War with their always self-righteous, often deluded, and sometimes zany proclamations.


I'm absolutely shocked at this. Inciting the ACW? Zany? Always self-righteous? Goodness. Those zany abolitionists, how crazy believing enslaving humans is just, plain wrong.

".... wither away in unprofitable skinniness ". He had a way with words.

I was shocked to recently discover that there were Caucasians that were that pro-Black even back even in the 1800’s.


Had a relative hung because he allowed the local black population use his pub after hours. He stayed around, played cards, socialized. He was accused of inciting a riot ( there was no riot ). That was 1780 or so. I'm not sure it was because he was pro anything at all besides pro people.
 

OpnCoronet

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As in any movement, the intensity of belief varied. One thing for sure: in the 19th Century, anyone who proposed equal rights for Blacks was likely to be called a "Radical": the idea truly was radical.


I agree completely. But, there were many in and out of Congress, who believed far differently from Beecher, Steven or even Chase, who were lumped by southern activists, into the role of 'Radical' who actually were not, such as most Free Soilers, etc.
 

WJC

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I had to open Adobe acrobat Reader and then paste the link to open it. The quote was found in a section of the site that appears to have random quotes about Blacks, slavery, and freedom.
Thanks for your response and the information!
Now if we could only find more about that 1866 speech in New York....
 
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