Fictional Ironclad (Model)

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kevin klein

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Feb 10, 2019
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Finally finished the model project I've been working on. It is a "what if" concept of an Ironclad of the CSN, If things continued for several more years and the Confederate Navy had gained the materials and resources to build a Virginia III. It is kind of a Manassas on steroids. Armament consistes of 11" broad sides and a 15" on each end. The spikey looking things on the ends are crane booms for loading and unloading cargo and materials through a large door that also has a port for the 15" guns.

I wanted to use traditional building materials, Cedar wood for the main body, glue coated thread for railings, bristol paper, thread for rigging, bamboo for masts,cardboard and wire for various other things. The guns are brass tubing.

Scale is 1:200. 14" long 3" wide.

The last photo is a tintype of the model, I just had to do that to see what it looked like in the photographic process of the time.

There will be another model in the works soon.

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USS ALASKA

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Mar 16, 2016
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4,537
@kevin klein

That last pic sir - looks like Charleston - 1865? Where did you find that? Library of Congress? What a find! :sneaky: Outstanding job, sir!

Jules Verne would be impressed . . . and the French Navy (during the Pre-dreadnought era) would hire you on the spot.
The French would need more tumblehome...LOTS more...but very close :wink: Kinda like cowbell...
3

Cheers! Well done!
USS ALASKA
 
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rebelatsea

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Finally finished the model project I've been working on. It is a "what if" concept of an Ironclad of the CSN, If things continued for several more years and the Confederate Navy had gained the materials and resources to build a Virginia III. It is kind of a Manassas on steroids. Armament consistes of 11" broad sides and a 15" on each end. The spikey looking things on the ends are crane booms for loading and unloading cargo and materials through a large door that also has a port for the 15" guns.

I wanted to use traditional building materials, Cedar wood for the main body, glue coated thread for railings, bristol paper, thread for rigging, bamboo for masts,cardboard and wire for various other things. The guns are brass tubing.

Scale is 1:200. 14" long 3" wide.

The last photo is a tintype of the model, I just had to do that to see what it looked like in the photographic process of the time.

There will be another model in the works soon.

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With 20 guns that should be about the size of CSS Mississippi in length and beam.
 

Waterloo50

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Finally finished the model project I've been working on. It is a "what if" concept of an Ironclad of the CSN, If things continued for several more years and the Confederate Navy had gained the materials and resources to build a Virginia III. It is kind of a Manassas on steroids. Armament consistes of 11" broad sides and a 15" on each end. The spikey looking things on the ends are crane booms for loading and unloading cargo and materials through a large door that also has a port for the 15" guns.

I wanted to use traditional building materials, Cedar wood for the main body, glue coated thread for railings, bristol paper, thread for rigging, bamboo for masts,cardboard and wire for various other things. The guns are brass tubing.

Scale is 1:200. 14" long 3" wide.

The last photo is a tintype of the model, I just had to do that to see what it looked like in the photographic process of the time.

There will be another model in the works soon.

View attachment 299703

View attachment 299704

View attachment 299705

View attachment 299706

View attachment 299707

View attachment 299708

View attachment 299709
Wow, what a fantastic model, I have to say that I’m particularly impressed by your weathering technique, your tintype photo highlights your skills as a modeller perfectly. Good job.
 

Tut11

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Jan 24, 2018
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Exquisite and highly creative!! Love the tintype image. Look forward to more in the future. Did you decide a name for her yet?
 
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kevin klein

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Anchors, anchors, where are the anchors! Agreed, Jules Verne would be proud of you. Great effort and great photography!
Hawserholes and anchors are consealed inside to protect from damage, probably not realistic but that's my lame excuse. I did think of having them outside, there is still time for that.
 

SeaSoldier

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Texas
Actually Kevin, you were spot on. If one were to look at the USS Monitor, the anchors are drawn up into the hull "lip" at the bow - totally under water. The CSA Virginia had a weakness of exposed rudder lines and paid the price for that at some point.
However, your model sports a rounded topside and appears to have a lot of freeboard and sail area (what is above the water line). If the hull that is underwater, is as rounded at the design on top then this would have a rough time on the open seas. Probably not much better in rivers and streams. Flat bottom - well better on rivers but rough on the seas. Not to be too picky - it is a great effort.
 
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kevin klein

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Actually Kevin, you were spot on. If one were to look at the USS Monitor, the anchors are drawn up into the hull "lip" at the bow - totally under water. The CSA Virginia had a weakness of exposed rudder lines and paid the price for that at some point.
However, your model sports a rounded topside and appears to have a lot of freeboard and sail area (what is above the water line). If the hull that is underwater, is as rounded at the design on top then this would have a rough time on the open seas. Probably not much better in rivers and streams. Flat bottom - well better on rivers but rough on the seas. Not to be too picky - it is a great effort.
I thank you for your input. Not being a nautical engineer I will make mistakes in this kind of design. Yes I did imagine it having more of a flat bottom rather than a conventional curved hull to prevent excessive rolling, but it's just something interesting to think about. I welcome the opinions of others, that's why I'm here, to learn and enjoy the company of other enthusiasts.
 
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SeaSoldier

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Texas
You model is incredible in both design and detail. Look at some of the vessels that both sides set afloat. Decide if you next model needs to be sea going or a river war craft. Your model displays creativity as well as attention to detail. Keep on with it!
 

rebelatsea

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Mar 30, 2013
Messages
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Location
Kent ,England.
Actually Kevin, you were spot on. If one were to look at the USS Monitor, the anchors are drawn up into the hull "lip" at the bow - totally under water. The CSA Virginia had a weakness of exposed rudder lines and paid the price for that at some point.
However, your model sports a rounded topside and appears to have a lot of freeboard and sail area (what is above the water line). If the hull that is underwater, is as rounded at the design on top then this would have a rough time on the open seas. Probably not much better in rivers and streams. Flat bottom - well better on rivers but rough on the seas. Not to be too picky - it is a great effort.
CSS (not CSA) Virginia's rudder chains were protected, it was CSS Tennessee that had them exposed.
 
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Bruce Allardice

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Jan 27, 2019
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Finally finished the model project I've been working on. It is a "what if" concept of an Ironclad of the CSN, If things continued for several more years and the Confederate Navy had gained the materials and resources to build a Virginia III. It is kind of a Manassas on steroids. Armament consistes of 11" broad sides and a 15" on each end. The spikey looking things on the ends are crane booms for loading and unloading cargo and materials through a large door that also has a port for the 15" guns.

I wanted to use traditional building materials, Cedar wood for the main body, glue coated thread for railings, bristol paper, thread for rigging, bamboo for masts,cardboard and wire for various other things. The guns are brass tubing.

Scale is 1:200. 14" long 3" wide.

The last photo is a tintype of the model, I just had to do that to see what it looked like in the photographic process of the time.

There will be another model in the works soon.

View attachment 299703

View attachment 299704

View attachment 299705

View attachment 299706

View attachment 299707

View attachment 299708

View attachment 299709
Interesting looking design.
I suspect it would have had too deep a draft to operate on the southern rivers and ports, and too little freeboard to operate successfully on the oceans.
 
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