24th Georgia Infantry

Podad

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 18, 2009
Location
NE Georgia
The 24th Infantry Regiment, organized during the summer of 1861, recruited its members in White, Banks, Towns, Rabun, Gwinnett, Elbert, Hall, Franklin, and Habersham counties. The field officers were Colonels Robert McMillan and C. C. Sanders, Lieutenant Colonels Joseph N. Chandler and Thomas E. Winn, and Majors Robert E. McMillan and Frederick C. Smith. After serving in the Department of North Carolina the unit moved to Virginia where it was brigaded under Generals H. Cobb, T. R. R. Cobb, Wofford, and DuBose.

The 24th Infantry Regiment fought in the difficult campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days Battles to Gettysburg, then moved to Georgia with Longstreet The 24th was engaged at Chickamauga and did see action in the Knoxville Campaign. The regiment returned to Virginia and participated in the conflicts at The Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor. was active in the Shenandoah Valley and ended the war at Appomattox.

Soon after being mustered into Confederate service the regiment was moved to Lynchburg, Virginia. Within a week of arriving there, however, it was ordered to Goldsborough North Carolina. There it joined the Department of North Carolina. The unit remained there until early in 1862. Returning to Virginia, the unit was placed in the Army of Northern Virginia. It served in that army until the summer of 1863. At that time it was moved to Georgia where it served in the Army of Tennessee. It next saw service in the Department of East Tennessee. In the spring of 1864 the regiment returned to the Army of Northern Virginia, remaining in that army until mid-summer 1864. It then moved to the Shenandoah Valley where it served in the Army of the Valley District. Finally, in December 1864, the unit returned to the Army of Northern Virginia, serving in that army for the remainder of the war. The Regiment was among those surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia on April 9, 1865

source Wikipedia
 

Mike Serpa

Major
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
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The Southern Side: or, Andersonville Prison (Page 93)
by
Stevenson, R. Randolph. no 93034081
Published 1876
https://archive.org/stream/b24861492#page/92/mode/2up
 

Podad

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 18, 2009
Location
NE Georgia
Confederate Soldiers who served in Company C of the 24th Georgia Infantry, from White County, Georgia, "White County Marksmen"

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=vcsr&GSvcid=278117


Two of the entries on this virtual cemetery are Jacksons. Evans Calloway Jackson was my Great Grandfather. He was buried in a cemetery in White County Ga but the exact location is unknown. The marker showing is one my mother and I put on his widows grave in memory of ECJ. Curtis Jackson who died at Elmira was his brother.

Muletrain who created the virtual cemetery is the spouse of a cousin.
 

Podad

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 18, 2009
Location
NE Georgia
  • The list below shows the names of the 60 officers and enlisted men of the 24th Ga. Infantry who surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse Va. on April 9, 1865.

    • Jarrard, I. A., Capt., Commanding
      Piggott, Wm. M., Surgeon
      Mitchell, T. K., Asst. Surgeon
      McMannen, L. D., Asst. Surgeon
      Oliver, D. C., Quartermaster Sargent

      "Company A"
      Barnes, J. H., Pvt.
      Gober, L. H., Pvt.
      Morgan, W. J., Pvt.
      Simmons, R. O., Pvt.
      Westbrooks, W. C., Pvt.

      "Company B"
      Teasley, W. J., Corp'l.
      Brown, J., Pvt.
      Brown, W. F., Pvt.
      Jordan, G., Pvt.
      McGarrity, G., Pvt.
      Payne, L. C., Pvt.
      Powell, J., Pvt.
      Wallace, P. M., Pvt.

      "Company C"
      Pitchford, J. A., Corp'l.
      Tate, D. G., Corp'l.
      Alexander, W., Pvt.
      Bowen, T. J., Pvt.
      Chambers, W. J., Pvt.
      Jackson, E. C., Pvt

      . "Company D"
      Wheeler, R. F., Pvt.

      "Company E" Love, J. R., Corp'l.
      Dickson, W. L., Pvt.
      Ellyson, E., Pvt.
      Hunter, J., Pvt.
      Jones, A., Pvt.
      Langston, W. D., Pvt.
      Singleton, H. H., Pvt.
      Singleton, J. R., Pvt.
      Williams, J. H., Pvt.

      "Company F"
      Bradford, J., Corp'l.
      Davis, G. H., Pvt.
      Kemp, J. H., Pvt.
      Robinson, H. J., Pvt.
      Sparks, G., Pvt.
      Stanford, D. B., Pvt.

      "Company G"
      Hill, J. W., Serg't.
      Deal, E. G., Pvt.
      Youngblood, J. R., Pvt.

      "Company H"
      McCurdy, D., Serg't.
      Moise, A. W., Pvt.
      Smith, J. H., Pvt.

      "Company I"
      Broom, J., Pvt.
      Chambers, T., Pvt.
      Dodd, A. H., Pvt.
      Grier, A. J., Pvt.
      Head, Joseph, Pvt.
      Holcombe, Tom, Pvt.
      Jones, J., Pvt.
      Norris, R., Pvt.
      Voyles, J., Pvt.

      "Company K"
      Haddock, J. H., 1st Serg't.
      Deaton, W. J., Corp'l.
      Cleveland, J. L., Pvt.
      Harrison, W. L., Pvt.
      Wade, W.H., Pvt.
 
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Podad

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 18, 2009
Location
NE Georgia
An article about Colonel McMillan of the 24th Ga. This appeared in the Richmond Whig on Dec. 26, 1862.

A Gallant Irishman at Fredricksburg

The following extract from a private letter will show that Meagher met his match at Fredericksburg in a gallant son of the Emerald Isle, Colonel Robert McMillan, of the 24th Georgia. We should like to see McMillan at the head of the lamented Cobb’s brigade, pitted against Meagher or Corcoran in an open field:

“But the rejoicing ceased for a time, and mourning sat on every countenance, as four grief-stricken litter bearers passed down the lines, bearing the heroic Cobb, who had fallen in the first charge of the enemy. Lieutenant Colonel Cook, commanding Phillip’s Georgia Legion, was killed at this period of the action. A fixed resolution seemed at once to possess every heart, to avenge the death-wound given to their General, and it devolved upon Col. Robert McMillan, of the 24th Georgia Regiment, to lead them in the effort. An opportunity now offered. A column, stronger and heavier than the first, was seen to advance. Flash after flash was seen upon the opposite river bank. Shell after shell fell around us, which were responded to from the heights in our rear. Colonel McMillan directed the small arms to cease until the enemy should come within musket range. The artillery continued its thunder, the musketry remaining silent, till the enemy came within fire of our shortest range guns. Soon leaden hail commenced pouring from the clouds of smoke before us. The Colonel passed along the lines surveying the movements of the enemy, when suddenly, at his command, the brigade rose and sent a volley into the ranks of the foe, which carried ruin in its way. Again and again was the assault renewed, and again and again was it repulsed, with tremendous slaughter. For the troops, the position chosen was an admirable one, but on the part of the officer who did his duty, there was required the utmost coolness and courage. This, Colonel McMillan certainly manifested. While he was passing along the line, waving his sword, and encouraging his men, they seemed to catch the spirit of their leader, and redouble their efforts, while his own regiment turned, in the thickest of the fight, and gave him three hearty cheers. He possesses the confidence of his troops. They love him, and, if need be, will follow him to the death. In the battle of Fredericksburg, he won a laurel wreath, to which fresh leaves will doubtless be added, when the tocsin shall again summon him to the field.” (2)
 

Legion Para

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https://sites.google.com/site/kevinwancestry/men-of-wofford-s-georgia-brigade

24th GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY


jnchandler.jpg

Captain Joseph N. Chandler of Banks County began the war as Captain of Company A of the 24th Georgia. In January of 1864 he would become Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment. He would serve in that position until September of 1864 when he resigned. After the war he moved to Texas and worked as a minister before being elected to the Texas State Legislature. He died in Hood County, Texas in 1920.


sanders.jpg

Colonel Christopher Columbus Sanders began the war as Lieutenant Colonel of the 24th Georgia. In early 1864 he was made Colonel of the regiment. He would be wounded at Spotsylvania Court House then captured at the Battle of Sailor's Creek. After the war he moved to south Georgia, then to Gainesville, Georgia where he was a prominent businessman, served on the Board of Education, and was a trustee of Brenau College. He died in 1908 and is buried in Gainesville.


whitfield.jpg

Pvt. Henry Whitfield of Banks County enlisted with Company A of the 24th Georgia. He was wounded at the Battle of Crampton's Gap in September of 1862. When the 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharp Shooters was organized he became part of Company B of that regiment. After the war he moved to Arkansas where he died in 1873.


keeling.jpg

Captain George Washington Keeling, Sr. of Franklin County began the war as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company H of the 24th Georgia. In January of 1862 he was elected Captain of the company but by August of that year he resigned due to old age. After the war he moved to Texas where he died in 1888.


chrisgarrison.jpg

Pvt. Christopher Garrison of Banks County enlisted with Company A of the 24th Georgia. He only appears on the rolls of 1861 but is rumored to have died in 1863.


davant.jpg

Captain Phillip E. Davant of Hart County enlisted with Company B of the 24th Georgia. He transferred to the 3rd Battalion Georgia Sharp Shooters upon its formation and became a Major. He then transferred to the 38th Georgia Infantry and became a Lieutenant Colonel. He was captured at the Battle of Spotsylvania and exchanged two months later. He rejoined the 38th and served through to Appomattox. After the war and for the remainder of his life he was a school teacher and principal. He died in 1906 in Taylor County, Georgia.


Johnfran.gif

Pvt. James Francis Cain enlisted with Gwinnett County's Company F of the 24th Georgia. He was wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg in December of 1862. He was captured at the Battle of Cedar Creek in October of 1864. He was paroled at Point Lookout and there is no later record. After the war he was a farmer in northern Gwinnett County where he died in 1902.
 

lelliott19

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Ran across this, from the carded records of Christopher Columbus Sanders, which will be of interest regarding the firearms carried by the men of the 24th Georgia.. At the time, Sanders was 23 yo and Lt Col commanding the 24th Georgia.

Can you imagine the difficulty of distributing ammunition with this assortment of arms?Luckily, the request seems to be have been successful. It was approved by TRR Cobb and forwarded to the Ordnance Officer of McLaws Division to obtain 153 Springfield Muskets as recommended by Genl McLaws.(carded records of CC Sanders p. 41) I've transcribed the return below since it is difficult to read.

Camp near Richmond July 15, 1862

Col. T R R Cobb

Below please find a descriptive list of the fire arms as returned by the Company commanders of this Regt

Springfield Muskets..... cal 69 ......231
Minie Muskets..............cal 58.......122_____________353
Enfield Rifle ..................cal 54......182
Springfield ....................cal [ ]..........8
Harpers Ferry................cal 54.........7
Belgium..........................cal [ ].........4
Mississippi......................cal [ ].........2_____________203 = 556 - 403
(wanted) Springfield Muskets 153

The difficulty attending the distribution of ammunition for the above described firearms _ causes me to respectfully suggest to you, to retain for my flank companies, the Enfield Rifle_ and for the other companies, the Springfield Musket.
Respectfully submitted,
C. C. Sanders
Lt Col Comdg 24th Geo Regt

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Kyle R

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Feb 11, 2018
Location
Lynchburg, VA
download.jpg

C. C. Sanders would use this cropped version photograph in his "Letters from the Holy Land" booklet published in 1906. He entitled the photograph "GMI Graduation Photo". In truth, a wider version of the photo clearly reveals lieutenant colonel shoulder straps. The photo would have had to been taken post Georgia Military Institute (GMI) graduation. I cannot pinpoint the exact location the photograph would have been taken but an educated guess is sometime in early 1861 with the likely locations in Atlanta, Georgia or Lynchburg, Virginia.
@Podad @xlsteve @lelliott19
 
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Kyle R

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Feb 11, 2018
Location
Lynchburg, VA
“There are many colorful, comical stories of the nefarious actions of the Irish soldier in camp. Elijah Henry Sutton of the 24th Georgia remembers the antics of company clown Henry Holbrooks of the McMillan Guards, the regiment’s Company K. Holbrooks had been detailed by the Irish Col. Robert McMillan to carry the guidon for the regiment in drill and so was quite pleased when he was told he was not required to carry a rifle. The company commander, however, ordered the sergeant to furnish Holbrooks with a weapon. Sgt. Calvin J. Allen ordered Holbrooks to take a rifle of he would be arrested. Holbrooks answered, “I’m dammed if I do it, Sergeant. If you want that gun carried, carry it yourself, by God!” The Irishman then struck Sergeant Allen over the head with a piece of rail, knocking him down, and ran off. Nothing was ever done about it, Sutton said.” Kelly J. O’Grady, Clear the Confederate Way!, Savas Publishing Company, Mason City, IA, 2000, p. 78-79.
@lelliott19 @xlsteve @Podad
 

Kyle R

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Location
Lynchburg, VA
To the extent of my research there is no difinitive answer as to what the 24th Georgia regimental flag looked like. The soldiers tore the flag into pieces and each soldier took a piece rather than surrender it at Appomattox.
 

Kyle R

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Feb 11, 2018
Location
Lynchburg, VA
download.jpg
Sanders.jpg


An update from my February 26 post (see above). A closer examination of the cropped photograph of Sanders reveals two lighter color lines on his shoulders. When shown in full view, the "lines" are clearly officer shoulder straps which are of lieutenant colonel rank. The diamond shape on the breast pocket is Sanders SAE pin from the Georgia Military Institute.
 

Stiles/Akin

Sergeant Major
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Apr 1, 2016
Location
Atlanta, Georgia
6jun1905.jpg


Part of the Andrew W. Cain Newspaper Collection at the North Georgia College & State University Archives and Special Collections, which is housed at the Library Technology Center. The digitized portion of this collection range in dates from 1864-1905. The full collection dates range from 1864-1963.

https://archive.org/details/AWC_1905_6JUN?q=24th+Georgia+infantry
 

Ga24thCo.K

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Mar 15, 2018
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Home is the N. Ga Mtns
If a picture of him exists either @lelliott19 or @Chattahooch33 would know.

What a treasure that would be! A distant family member said they thought there was a photo of him in the Cyclorama in Atlanta but since that all got moved to the Atlanta History Center, I'm not sure where to look. I have an email request into the AHC to ask if they know if it is true, so I have a sliver of hope.
 

lelliott19

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View attachment 178559 View attachment 178560

An update from my February 26 post (see above). A closer examination of the cropped photograph of Sanders reveals two lighter color lines on his shoulders. When shown in full view, the "lines" are clearly officer shoulder straps which are of lieutenant colonel rank. The diamond shape on the breast pocket is Sanders SAE pin from the Georgia Military Institute.
Kyle - do you have the original of the image in your possession? I sure like the original version better than the crop!
 

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