Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

CivilWarTalk

Lieutenant General
Managing Member & Webmaster
Joined
Apr 1, 1999
Messages
143,138
Location
Martinsburg, WV
The 10 pdr. Parrott Rifle, invented by Robert Parker Parrott, was manufactured by the West Point Foundry in the North, and copies were made at several foundries in the South. The patented manufacturing process started with a cast iron barrel, which on it's own was too brittle to use as a cannon, and combined it with a large reinforcing band made of tougher wrought iron overlaid on the breech of the casting. By designing the cannon this way, the barrel was intended to be strong, light, cheap, and effective as a rifled cannon, a relatively new type of field artillery for the era.

ARTILLERY PROFILE
  • Models:
    • 10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861, or Old Model Parrott, with a 2.9 inch bore
    • 3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863, or New Model Parrott, still a 10-pdr. Parrott
  • Type: Muzzleloading Rifled Gun
  • In Service With:
    • United States Army - Marked "U.S."
    • State of New York - Marked "S.N.Y."
    • Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (10) - Marked "C.P."
    • Commonwealth of Virginia (13 Early WPF Pieces) - Unmarked? Marked "C.V."?
    • Confederate States Army (Copies & Captured Pieces)
  • Purpose: Counter-battery & Support the infantry and cavalry forces in the field
  • Invented By: Robert Parker Parrott in 1859-1860
  • Patent: For Manufacturing Issued October 1, 1861
    • U.S. Patent # 33,401 (see illustration)
  • Rarity: Common


1572574173372.png

Improvement to the Manufacture of Ordnance
By Application of a Wrought-Iron Reinforce
to a Gun Made of Cast-Iron

Google: U.S. Patent 33,401

10475888753_15bcb9d421_o.jpg

At Gettysburg NBMP, by Gary Todd, July 1978

10484029133_4e30207b12_o.jpg

At Chickamauga Battlefield by Gary Todd, Aug 2012

10492979926_dd2e13b871_o.jpg

At Chickamauga Battlefield
by Gary Todd, Aug 2012

MANUFACTURING
  • US Casting Foundry: 1
  • CS Casting Foundries: 4+
    • J. R. Anderson Co. of Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond, VA (80+ copies produced)
    • Bujac & Bennett, New Orleans, LA (about 20 copies produced)
    • Macon Arsenal, Ga (about 10 copies produced)
    • Street, Hungerford & Jackson in Memphis, TN (about 3+ copies produced)
    • Also possible evidence Noble Brothers making copies
  • Years of Manufacture: Between 1860 and 1865
  • Tube Composition: Cast Iron, Wrought Iron Breech Band
  • Purchase Price in 1861: $180 (US); $ 300 (CS)
  • Purchase Price in 1865: $187 (US); $3,000 (CS)
  • Variants: 3 Major Variants, with at least 4 Confederate Foundries Making Copies
    • Parrott Model 1861 2.9 Inch: (228 to 255 produced)
      • Characterized by a muzzle swell, as well as a "step" in the profile in front of the trunnions. Early models made use of a centerline front sight blade mounted on the muzzle.
      • Typical Markings:
        • Tube top between trunnions: "U.S.", "S.N.Y." or "C.P."
        • Muzzle: Registry "No. ###" at top, "10 Pdr.", and "2.9" at bottom
        • Right Trunnion: "R.P.P." at top and "W.P.F." at bottom
        • Left Trunnion: 4 Digit Year of Manufacture
        • Breech: Weight in lbs. under knob & "CAV" or "PATENTED 1861" stamped at top of reinforce.
      • From 1864 to 1865, the U.S. Army removed about 119 units from inventory to convert them to 3" guns. None are known to have survived the conversion process or have ever been found, it has been theorized that these guns were scrapped.
    • Parrott Model 1863 3.0 Inch: (279 produced)
      • Characterized by a straight muzzle, and straight profile lines, and a right trunnion mounted front sight blade, with a matching offset socket attached to the reinforcing band for the rear sight. Many battlefield examples are missing the socket and only the threaded hole in the band remains.
      • Typical Markings:
        • Tube top between trunnions: "U.S."
        • Muzzle:
          • Weight in lbs., Registry "No. ###", Year of Mfr, "W.P.F." at top,
          • Initials of Ordnance Inspector, "3.0 IN" at bottom
        • Right Trunnion: "R.P.P."
        • Left Trunnion: "10-Pdr." or Unmarked
        • Breech: "3.0 IN. BORE" above knob, Weight in lbs. under knob & "PATENTED 1861" stamped at top of reinforce.
    • Confederate Copies of 2.9 & 3.0 Inch Parrott Models: produced by 4 different foundries
      • Characterized by overall appearing longer and larger than Parrott's made in New York, and having a lengthier and heavier reinforcing band that usually shows a bevel or taper at the front (trunnion) side. Sometimes have no readable markings, and a rougher looking casting.
  • No. Purchased During the Civil War: approx. 630
    • Includes more than 80 made by the CS
  • No. of Surviving Pieces Today: 190+
  • Special Notes: 10 pdr. Parrott Rifles were easy to Manufacture, Inexpensive, Reliable, and Accurate to Shoot.
WEIGHTS & MEASURES
  • Bore Diameter:
    • 2.9 inches (Model 1861-62)
    • 3.0 inches (Model 1863-65)
  • Bore Length: 70 inches
  • Rifling Type (US):
    • 3 equal lands & grooves, 0.1" depth
    • right hand gain twist, 1 turn in 10'
  • Rifling Type (CS): (1 turn in 16')
    10lb-Parrott-Rifling.png
    • 3 groves right hand twist
    • 12 grooves left hand twist
  • Trunnion Diameter: 3.67 inches
  • Reinforcing Band: Thickness - 1.10", Length - 13.0"
  • Barrel Thickness: at small of Muzzle - 1.22 inches; at Vent - 4.2 inches
  • Tube Length: 78 inches (US); 81 inches (CS)
  • Tube Weight: 890 lbs. (US); 1,150 lbs. (CS)
  • Carriage Type: M1841 No. 1 Field Carriage (900 lbs.), 57" wheels
  • Total Weight (Gun & Carriage): 1,800 lbs. (US); 2,060 lbs. (CS)
  • Horses Required to Pull: 6
  • No. of Crew to Serve: Typical - 9, 1 Gunner, 8 Numbered Crew Positions
    • Could operate at a reduced rate with as few as 2 Crew
AMMUNITION
  • Standard Powder Charge: 1 lbs. Cannon Grade Black Powder
  • Projectiles Types: Elongated Projectiles; Shell, Shrapnel/Case Shot, Canister Shot, Solid Shot
    • Designed to use Parrott Patent Rounds, Also Compatible with Hotchkiss Shells, Never to use Schenkl Shells.
  • Projectiles Weights: Case Shot 10½ lbs., Shells 9¾ lbs.
  • Typical Number of Projectiles Per Gun: 200
    • Loaded in four - 50 round / mixed ammo chests
    • Cannon had one limber with chest; Caisson had one limber with chest, and carried two additional chests.
    • As of November 1863, chests should be filled with 25 shells, 20 case shot, and 5 canister
    • As of March 1865, chests should be filled with 30 shell, 15 case shot, and 5 canister for horse artillery
PERFORMANCE
  • Sights: Early models utilized a tall skinny front site on the muzzle, and a pendulum hausse rear sight centered behind the reinforcing band. Soon, Parrott introduced a brass tangent sight of his own design that could be mounted in a socket on the right side of the wrought iron band, and a front sight blade mounted on top of the right rimbase where it was less likely to be bent or broken.
  • Rate of Fire: Max 2 to 3 rounds per minute (max rate achieved with no sponging)
  • Muzzle Velocity: 1,230 ft/sec.
  • Effective Range (at 5°): up to 1,900 yards (1.1 miles)
  • Projectile Flight Time (at 5°): about 8 seconds
  • Max Range (at 35°): 5,000 yards (2.8 miles)
  • Projectile Flight Time (at 35°): about 21 seconds
1576000647293.png

Table from Ranges of Parrott Guns, and Notes for Practice
by R.P.Parrott, NY, 1863.


NOTES
Parrotts were produced in two bore sizes, 2.9-inch and 3.0-inch. Until 1864, Union batteries used only the 2.9 inch Parrotts, but they also employed 3" Ordnance rifles, causing supply problems. In 1863, plans were made in the North to re-bore all remaining 2.9" Parrotts to 3" to standardize ammunition, and shifting West Point Foundry manufacturing to new 3" Parrott Rifles.​
Due to the limited availability of cannon, Southern batteries had to employ both 2.9" and 3.0" guns, and would outfit four Parrott rifles of the same bore size to each battery as they became available, frequently employing older captured M1861 2.9" Parrotts from the U.S. Army, for the duration of the war. This only added to the ammunition supply complications for the South.​
Many Confederate cannons have bands and are frequently misidentified as Parrott rifles, even though they are not. The Brooke Rifle, which has a similar appearance to the Parrott Rifle is sometimes said to be a Parrott Copy. Many attribute this to the fact that some characteristics of Brooke Rifles were copied directly from examining the Parrott design, but Brooke Rifles were their own design in many ways, including manufacturing process.​

FOR FURTHER READING
ASSOCIATED LINKS

 
Last edited:

CivilWarTalk

Lieutenant General
Managing Member & Webmaster
Joined
Apr 1, 1999
Messages
143,138
Location
Martinsburg, WV


1575990038462.png

Muzzle View - Marked "No. 35" "10 Pdr." "2.9"
10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 35, Cast in 1861, Weight 910 lbs.
Inspected by R.P.P. (Robert Parker Parrott)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575990078985.png

Right Trunnion View
10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 35, Cast in 1861, Weight 910 lbs.
Inspected by R.P.P. (Robert Parker Parrott)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575990100485.png

View of Federal Acceptance Marks above Trunnions
10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 35, Cast in 1861, Weight 910 lbs.
Inspected by R.P.P. (Robert Parker Parrott)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575990139790.png

Left Trunnion View
10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 35, Cast in 1861, Weight 910 lbs.
Inspected by R.P.P. (Robert Parker Parrott)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575990180442.png

10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 35, Cast in 1861, Weight 910 lbs.
Inspected by R.P.P. (Robert Parker Parrott)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019



1575992836055.png

Muzzle View
10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 241, Cast in 1863, Foundry #70, Weight 898 lbs.
Inspected by A.M. (Alfred Mordecai, Jr.)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575993016891.png

Right Trunnion View
10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 241, Cast in 1863, Foundry #70, Weight 898 lbs.
Inspected by A.M. (Alfred Mordecai, Jr.)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575993041126.png

Breech View of Stamp Found at Top of Reinforcing Band
"PATENTED 1861"
10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 241, Cast in 1863, Foundry #70, Weight 898 lbs.
Inspected by A.M. (Alfred Mordecai, Jr.)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575993084345.png

Left Trunnion View
10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 241, Cast in 1863, Foundry #70, Weight 898 lbs.
Inspected by A.M. (Alfred Mordecai, Jr.)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575993152925.png

10-pdr. Parrott Rifle - Model of 1861
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 241, Cast in 1863, Foundry #70, Weight 898 lbs.
Inspected by A.M. (Alfred Mordecai, Jr.)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019



1575988492378.png

Muzzle View
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 38, Cast in 1864, Weight 892 lbs.
Inspected by D.W.F. (Daniel Webster Flagler)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575988366966.png

Right Trunnion View
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 38, Cast in 1864, Weight 892 lbs.
Inspected by D.W.F. (Daniel Webster Flagler)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575988349088.png

Breech View Above Knob
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 38, Cast in 1864, Weight 892 lbs.
Inspected by D.W.F. (Daniel Webster Flagler)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575988324271.png

View of Federal Acceptance Marks above Trunnions
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 38, Cast in 1864, Weight 892 lbs.
Inspected by D.W.F. (Daniel Webster Flagler)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575988252064.png

3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 38, Cast in 1864, Weight 892 lbs.
Inspected by D.W.F. (Daniel Webster Flagler)
W. Confed. Ave, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019



1575991351015.png

Muzzle View
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 149, Cast in 1864, Foundry #179, Weight 890 lbs.
Inspected by R.M.H. (Richard M. Hill)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575991465181.png

Bore View - 2" x 6" Bookmark for Bore Scale
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 149, Cast in 1864, Foundry #179, Weight 890 lbs.
Inspected by R.M.H. (Richard M. Hill)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575991506689.png

Right Trunnion View
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 149, Cast in 1864, Foundry #179, Weight 890 lbs.
Inspected by R.M.H. (Richard M. Hill)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575991523084.png

Right Rimbase at Front Sight Mount Location
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 149, Cast in 1864, Foundry #179, Weight 890 lbs.
Inspected by R.M.H. (Richard M. Hill)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575991541127.png

Foundry Number "179" on Face of Right Rimbase
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 149, Cast in 1864, Foundry #179, Weight 890 lbs.
Inspected by R.M.H. (Richard M. Hill)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575991578296.png

Breech View Above Knob
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 149, Cast in 1864, Foundry #179, Weight 890 lbs.
Inspected by R.M.H. (Richard M. Hill)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575991613063.png

View of Federal Acceptance Marks above Trunnions
3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 149, Cast in 1864, Foundry #179, Weight 890 lbs.
Inspected by R.M.H. (Richard M. Hill)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575991651617.png

Detail view of vertical joins where
"spiral wrought iron bars meet" in Parrott Banding Process

3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 149, Cast in 1864, Foundry #179, Weight 890 lbs.
Inspected by R.M.H. (Richard M. Hill)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019

1575991687158.png

3-inch Parrott Rifle - Model of 1863
Made by West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York
No. 149, Cast in 1864, Foundry #179, Weight 890 lbs.
Inspected by R.M.H. (Richard M. Hill)
1st NJ, Battery A Monument, Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, December 2019
 
Last edited:

CivilWarTalk

Lieutenant General
Managing Member & Webmaster
Joined
Apr 1, 1999
Messages
143,138
Location
Martinsburg, WV
More evidence to support the fact that not all officers felt that ALL Parrott guns were dangerous or inferior. Just the ones that burst most frequently, such as the 100 pounder and in the case of this quote, 200 pounder versions of Parrotts design.

1574862957304.png

Quote by General Quincy Gillmore, November 1864.
Engineer and artillery operations against the defenses of Charleston Harbor in 1863, by Quincy Adams Gillmore, 1865, Page 90 .
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

redbob

Captain
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
7,267
Location
Hoover, Alabama
Pretty much as soon as the War ended, so did the Parrott's use with the 3" Ordnance Rifle becoming the field artillery weapon of choice of the US Army until the 1880's. Photo LoC. Only 1 3" Ordnance Rifle was recorded as bursting in action and approximately 965 were manufactured between 1861 and 1867.
1553539256592 (2).png
 
Last edited:
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

ucvrelics

Major
Forum Host
Joined
May 7, 2016
Messages
8,600
Location
Alabama
the Parrott's use with the 3" Ordnance Rifle becoming the field artillery weapon of choice
I'll show a few of mine if you will.

The Parrott was such a great weapon that once the first of many were captured by CS troops, the CS Ord Dept copied them in several sizes.

A 3inch case shot I dug at Stones River
DSCN9257.JPG
DSCN9258.JPG
DSCN9262.JPG


100lber from Port Hudson I bought this one from the digger.
DSCN1614.JPG
DSCN1624.JPG
DSCN1627.JPG


3 inch Parrott I found at Blakley. Notice the pitting from the salt air and soil.
DSCN5992.JPG
DSCN5993.JPG
DSCN6002.JPG
 

Stone in the wall

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 19, 2017
Messages
1,474
Location
Blue Ridge Mountains, Jefferson County WV
  • In Service With: U.S. Army, State of New York, State of Virginia (13 Early WPF Pieces), C.S. Army (Copies & Captured Pieces)
  • Type: Muzzle Loading Rifled Gun
  • Patent: For Manufacturing Issued October 1, 1861, U.S. Patent # 33,401 (see below)
  • Variants: 3 Major Variants, with at least 4 Confederate Foundries Making Copies
    • Parrott Model 1861 2.9 Inch (228 to 255 produced)
      • Characterized by a muzzle swell, as well as a "step" in the profile in front of the trunnions. Early models made use of a centerline front sight blade mounted on the muzzle.
      • Typical Markings: "RPP" / "WPF" Stamped on the Right Trunnion. "10-Pdr." on the Left Trunnion, & "U.S." on top between trunnions. Weight in lbs. & "Patented 1861" on breech. Mfr. Year and RPP/WPF Stamped on the Trunnions. "2.9", Mfr. Number Stamped on the Muzzle.
      • From 1864 to 1865, the U.S. Army removed about 119 units from inventory to convert them to 3" guns, none are known to have survived the conversion process.
    • Parrott Model 1863 3.0 Inch (279 produced)
      • Characterized by a straight muzzle, and straight profile lines, and a right trunnion mounted front sight blade, with a matching offset socket attached to the reinforcing band for the rear sight. Many battlefield examples are missing the socket and only the threaded hole in the band remains.
      • Typical Markings: "RPP" / "WPF" Stamped on the Right Trunnion. "10-Pdr." or Unmarked on the Left Trunnion, & "U.S." on top between trunnions. "3.0 IN" "WPF", Weight in lbs, Mfr. Year, Mfr. Number Stamped on the Muzzle. "3 IN. BORE" & "Patented 1861" on breech.
    • Confederate Copies of 2.9 & 3.0 Inch Parrott Models made by 4 different foundries
      • Characterized by overall appearing longer and larger than Parrott's made in New York, and having a lengthier and heavier reinforcing band that usually shows a bevel or taper at the front (trunnion) side. Sometimes have no readable markings, and a rougher looking casting.
  • Rarity: CommonView attachment 332134
  • Years of Manufacture: Between 1860 and 1865
  • Tube Composition: Cast Iron, Wrought Iron Breech Band
  • Rate of Fire: 2 to 3 rounds per minute (max rate achieved with no sponging)
  • Bore Diameter: 2.9 inches (Model 1861-62); 3.0 inches (Model 1863-65)
  • Rifling Type (US): 3 grooves, right hand gain twist (1 turn in 16')
  • Rifling Type (CS): 3 groves right hand twist, or 12 grooves left hand twistView attachment 332127
  • Standard Powder Charge: 1 lb. Cannon Grade Black Powder
  • Muzzle Velocity: 1,230 ft/sec.
  • Effective Range (at 5°): up to 1,900 yards (1.1 miles)
  • Projectile Flight Time (at 5°): about 8 seconds
  • Max Range (at 35°): 5,000 yards (2.8 miles)
  • Projectile Flight Time (at 35°): about 21 seconds
  • Projectiles: Elongated Projectiles; Shell, Shrapnel/Case Shot, Canister Shot, Solid Shot
    • Designed to use Parrott Patent Rounds, Also Compatible with Hotchkiss Shells, Never to use Schenkl Shells.
  • Typical Number of Projectiles Per Gun: 200 - Loaded in 4 - 50 Round / Mixed Ammo Chests
    • 2 Limbers, each carrying a Chest; 1 to pull the Cannon, and 1 to pull the Caisson, which carried 2 additional Chests
  • Tube Length: 78 inches (US); 81 inches (CS)
  • Tube Weight: 890 lbs. (US); 1,150 lbs. (CS)
  • Carriage Type: M1841 No. 1 Field Carriage (900 lbs.), 57" wheels
  • Total Weight (Gun & Carriage): 1,800 lbs. (US); 2,060 lbs. (CS)
  • Horses Required to Pull: 6
  • No. of Crew to Serve:Typical - 9, 1 Gunner, 8 Numbered Crew Positions
    • Could operate at a reduced rate with as few as 2 Crew
  • No. in North America from 1861 to 1865: approx. 630, including more than 80 made by the CS
    • No. of Original Pieces You Can See in the Field Today: ???
  • Cost in 1862 Dollars: $180 (US); $ 300 (CS)
  • Cost in 1865 Dollars: $187 (US); $3,000 (CS)
  • Invented By: Robert Parker Parrott in 1859-1860
  • US Casting Foundry: West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, NY
  • CS Casting Foundries: 4+
    • Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond, VA (80+ copies produced)
    • Bujac & Bennett, New Orleans, LA (about 20 copies produced)
    • Macon Arsenal, Ga (about 10 copies produced)
    • Street, Hungerford & Jackson in Memphis, TN (about 3+ copies produced)
    • Also possible evidence Noble Brothers making copies
  • Special Notes: 10 pdr. Parrott Rifles were easy to Manufacture, Inexpensive, Reliable, and Accurate to Shoot.
    • Many Confederate cannons have bands and are frequently misidentified as Parrott rifles, even though they are not. The Brook Rifle, which has a similar appearance to the Parrott Rifle is sometimes said to be a Parrott Copy. Many attribute this to the fact that some characteristics of Brooke Rifles were copied directly from examining the Parrott design, but Brooke Rifles were their own design in many ways, including manufacturing process.
Is this what you shoot in Clark's Battery?
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Belfoured

Corporal
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
Messages
472
Pretty much as soon as the War ended, so did the Parrott's use with the 3" Ordnance Rifle becoming the field artillery weapon of choice of the US Army until the 1880's. Photo LoC. Only 1 3" Ordnance Rifle was recorded as bursting in action and approximately 965 were manufactured between 1861 and 1867.
View attachment 332113
Thanks for the photo. To follow up on your point about only one 3" ordnance rifle failing in combat, I believe that occurred at The Wilderness and involved Ricketts' Battery F 1st Pa. Light.
 

CivilWarTalk

Lieutenant General
Managing Member & Webmaster
Joined
Apr 1, 1999
Messages
143,138
Location
Martinsburg, WV
Thanks for the photo. To follow up on your point about only one 3" ordnance rifle failing in combat, I believe that occurred at The Wilderness and involved Ricketts' Battery F 1st Pa. Light.
I bet it was either damaged by something, like hit with an incoming shell and cracked, and they were unaware. Maybe a shell burst in the barrel and they didn't notice any damage? Or perhaps the barrel had some serious flaw, but the proofing process should have caught that.

The ordnance rifles back when they were freshly manufactured were seriously strong from what I've read.

However, time has not been kind to the Ordnance rifles, or so I've also been told.

You won't see live fire the Phoenix Iron Works Ordnance rifles anymore, or even blanks being fired really. The Iron has become quite brittle over time.... So, yeah, the 10 lb. Parrott's are now safer than the Ordnance Rifles, well if you are shooting them anyway....
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

byron ed

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Messages
3,076
Location
Midwest
...and to think that for $499. including shipping, the price of a water softener or big-screen TV, we can have a full-scale (non-firing) replica of a 10 lb. Parrot in our front yard -- if our significant other concurs, that is. (eBay "Ornamental-Cannon-Barrel-Replica, item 153332202309")
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Messages
4,416
Location
Aledo, IL
I bet it was either damaged by something, like hit with an incoming shell and cracked, and they were unaware. Maybe a shell burst in the barrel and they didn't notice any damage? Or perhaps the barrel had some serious flaw, but the proofing process should have caught that.

The ordnance rifles back when they were freshly manufactured were seriously strong from what I've read.

However, time has not been kind to the Ordnance rifles, or so I've also been told.

You won't see live fire the Phoenix Iron Works Ordnance rifles anymore, or even blanks being fired really. The Iron has become quite brittle over time.... So, yeah, the 10 lb. Parrott's are now safer than the Ordnance Rifles, well if you are shooting them anyway....
My reenacting unit has a Phoenix Ordnance rifle.....We fire blanks 1/2 pound of cannon grade powder) all summer long during reenactments, rough estimate of around 350 rounds per season. That gun is pictured with me standing next to it in my profile pic.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Belfoured

Corporal
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
Messages
472
I bet it was either damaged by something, like hit with an incoming shell and cracked, and they were unaware. Maybe a shell burst in the barrel and they didn't notice any damage? Or perhaps the barrel had some serious flaw, but the proofing process should have caught that.

The ordnance rifles back when they were freshly manufactured were seriously strong from what I've read.

However, time has not been kind to the Ordnance rifles, or so I've also been told.

You won't see live fire the Phoenix Iron Works Ordnance rifles anymore, or even blanks being fired really. The Iron has become quite brittle over time.... So, yeah, the 10 lb. Parrott's are now safer than the Ordnance Rifles, well if you are shooting them anyway....
That's interesting because in theory cast iron (the 10lb Parrott's tube) was more brittle and less malleable than wrought iron (the Ordnance Rifle's tube and the Parrott's breech wrap). This was due in part to the much higher carbon content in cast iron. I'm not aware of a difference in corrosion susceptibility but I suppose there could be one.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top