Lt.Arty What $632,500 Will Get You

ucvrelics

Colonel
Forum Host
Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Joined
May 7, 2016
Location
Alabama
This one sold a few days ago for $632,500. I had to stop bidding at $100 :cold: I know exactly where this gun was stationed at the Coosa River RR bridge as we located the fort site back in the 80's but this gun wasn't there.:D

5 of these 9-pounders manufactured at Columbus, Georgia, and that it includes an original limber. It is discussed on pages 68 and 69 of "Confederate Cannon Foundries" by Daniel and Gunter where it is noted that a total of 27 Columbus Napoleons had been located and "several years ago one of the authors came into possession of an 1863 bronze Columbus Arsenal 9-pounder, the only one known to survive." The F.C.H. marking on the muzzle is for Major Fredrick Clinton Humphries who commanded the Columbus Arsenal at Columbus, Georgia, (aka Confederate States Arsenal). Most of the surviving Columbus Arsenal pieces are still located at Gettysburg. The arsenal is known to have been active from March 1863 until it was destroyed by Union raiders in April 1865. The muzzle is marked "No. 5 F.C.H. ARSENAL COLUMBUS GEO. 1863. 437." A cone front sight is at the muzzle. The top of the barrel has "CS" near the trunnions. A carriage and a limber with a limber chest with a copper/bronze lid and "9 Pdr. Gun/C.S." in white paint on the outside along with a group of cannon balls inside are included. Also included are copies of archival documents. One from Acting Chief of Artillery Phillips of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana on September 15, 1864, indicates Major John Rawle, Chief of Artillery for the District of North Alabama, was to receive two 9-pounder Napoleons with 260 round shells and 90 rounds of canister for the defense of the Coosa bridge. It also notes that this was all of the ammunition available for these guns, and that they would be useless once the ammunition was depleted. Two 9-pounder Napoleons are recorded in Colonel J.S. Scott's command earlier in 1864 in eastern Louisiana in Captain W.P. Barlow's battery. Scott indicated the carriages were too light to be of use on June 19, 1864. This may have freed them up for use by Major Rawle. The Coosa River runs from Rome, Georgia, to just northeast Montgomery, Alabama. Rawle's use of these 9-pounders is also discussed in "Field Artillery Weapons of the Civil War."
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bayonet

Corporal
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
This one sold a few days ago for $632,500. I had to stop bidding at $100 :cold: I know exactly where this gun was stationed at the Coosa River RR bridge as we located the fort site back in the 80's but this gun wasn't there.:D

5 of these 9-pounders manufactured at Columbus, Georgia, and that it includes an original limber. It is discussed on pages 68 and 69 of "Confederate Cannon Foundries" by Daniel and Gunter where it is noted that a total of 27 Columbus Napoleons had been located and "several years ago one of the authors came into possession of an 1863 bronze Columbus Arsenal 9-pounder, the only one known to survive." The F.C.H. marking on the muzzle is for Major Fredrick Clinton Humphries who commanded the Columbus Arsenal at Columbus, Georgia, (aka Confederate States Arsenal). Most of the surviving Columbus Arsenal pieces are still located at Gettysburg. The arsenal is known to have been active from March 1863 until it was destroyed by Union raiders in April 1865. The muzzle is marked "No. 5 F.C.H. ARSENAL COLUMBUS GEO. 1863. 437." A cone front sight is at the muzzle. The top of the barrel has "CS" near the trunnions. A carriage and a limber with a limber chest with a copper/bronze lid and "9 Pdr. Gun/C.S." in white paint on the outside along with a group of cannon balls inside are included. Also included are copies of archival documents. One from Acting Chief of Artillery Phillips of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana on September 15, 1864, indicates Major John Rawle, Chief of Artillery for the District of North Alabama, was to receive two 9-pounder Napoleons with 260 round shells and 90 rounds of canister for the defense of the Coosa bridge. It also notes that this was all of the ammunition available for these guns, and that they would be useless once the ammunition was depleted. Two 9-pounder Napoleons are recorded in Colonel J.S. Scott's command earlier in 1864 in eastern Louisiana in Captain W.P. Barlow's battery. Scott indicated the carriages were too light to be of use on June 19, 1864. This may have freed them up for use by Major Rawle. The Coosa River runs from Rome, Georgia, to just northeast Montgomery, Alabama. Rawle's use of these 9-pounders is also discussed in "Field Artillery Weapons of the Civil War."
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Sorry you got outbid on your max bid of $100. Keep trying and 1 day you will be surprised that your low bid will be the winning bid or in my case the only bid won the item. Not long ago on this website some youngsters goofed on me and doubted me for saying you could get items at auctions for much lower than there value (that topics was swords). Well behold a 250 to 300 year old cannon complete with its swivel (making that rare) which was a river find. I bid the opening allowed bid as a joke never expecting to win but guess it was a slow day for this well known auction house. Surprise I won! It was appraised later at almost 4 times what I paid. Then about 1 1/2 years later 2 more appeared at auction. Guess that river gave up a few more relics from that sunken vessel. AND again they sold at 4 times what I paid for mine. So keep bidding low and 1 day you will hit the jackpot!
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ucvrelics

Colonel
Forum Host
Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Joined
May 7, 2016
Location
Alabama
Sorry you got outbid on your max bid of $100. Keep trying and 1 day you will be surprised that your low bid will be the winning bid or in my case the only bid won the item. Not long ago on this website some youngsters goofed on me and doubted me for saying you could get items at auctions for much lower than there value (that topics was swords). Well behold a 250 to 300 year old cannon complete with its swivel (making that rare) which was a river find. I bid the opening allowed bid as a joke never expecting to win but guess it was a slow day for this well known auction house. Surprise I won! It was appraised later at almost 4 times what I paid. Then about 1 1/2 years later 2 more appeared at auction. Guess that river gave up a few more relics from that sunken vessel. AND again they sold at 4 times what I paid for mine. So keep bidding low and 1 day you will hit the jackpot!View attachment 401057
The opening bid was $360,000 my $100 was a joke. Nice swivel gun
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
This one sold a few days ago for $632,500. I had to stop bidding at $100 :cold: I know exactly where this gun was stationed at the Coosa River RR bridge as we located the fort site back in the 80's but this gun wasn't there.:D

5 of these 9-pounders manufactured at Columbus, Georgia, and that it includes an original limber. It is discussed on pages 68 and 69 of "Confederate Cannon Foundries" by Daniel and Gunter where it is noted that a total of 27 Columbus Napoleons had been located and "several years ago one of the authors came into possession of an 1863 bronze Columbus Arsenal 9-pounder, the only one known to survive." The F.C.H. marking on the muzzle is for Major Fredrick Clinton Humphries who commanded the Columbus Arsenal at Columbus, Georgia, (aka Confederate States Arsenal). Most of the surviving Columbus Arsenal pieces are still located at Gettysburg. The arsenal is known to have been active from March 1863 until it was destroyed by Union raiders in April 1865. The muzzle is marked "No. 5 F.C.H. ARSENAL COLUMBUS GEO. 1863. 437." A cone front sight is at the muzzle. The top of the barrel has "CS" near the trunnions. A carriage and a limber with a limber chest with a copper/bronze lid and "9 Pdr. Gun/C.S." in white paint on the outside along with a group of cannon balls inside are included. Also included are copies of archival documents. One from Acting Chief of Artillery Phillips of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana on September 15, 1864, indicates Major John Rawle, Chief of Artillery for the District of North Alabama, was to receive two 9-pounder Napoleons with 260 round shells and 90 rounds of canister for the defense of the Coosa bridge. It also notes that this was all of the ammunition available for these guns, and that they would be useless once the ammunition was depleted. Two 9-pounder Napoleons are recorded in Colonel J.S. Scott's command earlier in 1864 in eastern Louisiana in Captain W.P. Barlow's battery. Scott indicated the carriages were too light to be of use on June 19, 1864. This may have freed them up for use by Major Rawle. The Coosa River runs from Rome, Georgia, to just northeast Montgomery, Alabama. Rawle's use of these 9-pounders is also discussed in "Field Artillery Weapons of the Civil War."
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There were actually two of these at Ft. Frederick State Park one an 1863 and the other dated 1864. The 1863 went on loan and mysteriously disappeared; the 1864, with incredible small arms dings remains at the Park.
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roundball1

Cadet
Joined
Dec 12, 2010
Location
Columbus, Georgia
This one sold a few days ago for $632,500. I had to stop bidding at $100 :cold: I know exactly where this gun was stationed at the Coosa River RR bridge as we located the fort site back in the 80's but this gun wasn't there.:D

5 of these 9-pounders manufactured at Columbus, Georgia, and that it includes an original limber. It is discussed on pages 68 and 69 of "Confederate Cannon Foundries" by Daniel and Gunter where it is noted that a total of 27 Columbus Napoleons had been located and "several years ago one of the authors came into possession of an 1863 bronze Columbus Arsenal 9-pounder, the only one known to survive." The F.C.H. marking on the muzzle is for Major Fredrick Clinton Humphries who commanded the Columbus Arsenal at Columbus, Georgia, (aka Confederate States Arsenal). Most of the surviving Columbus Arsenal pieces are still located at Gettysburg. The arsenal is known to have been active from March 1863 until it was destroyed by Union raiders in April 1865. The muzzle is marked "No. 5 F.C.H. ARSENAL COLUMBUS GEO. 1863. 437." A cone front sight is at the muzzle. The top of the barrel has "CS" near the trunnions. A carriage and a limber with a limber chest with a copper/bronze lid and "9 Pdr. Gun/C.S." in white paint on the outside along with a group of cannon balls inside are included. Also included are copies of archival documents. One from Acting Chief of Artillery Phillips of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana on September 15, 1864, indicates Major John Rawle, Chief of Artillery for the District of North Alabama, was to receive two 9-pounder Napoleons with 260 round shells and 90 rounds of canister for the defense of the Coosa bridge. It also notes that this was all of the ammunition available for these guns, and that they would be useless once the ammunition was depleted. Two 9-pounder Napoleons are recorded in Colonel J.S. Scott's command earlier in 1864 in eastern Louisiana in Captain W.P. Barlow's battery. Scott indicated the carriages were too light to be of use on June 19, 1864. This may have freed them up for use by Major Rawle. The Coosa River runs from Rome, Georgia, to just northeast Montgomery, Alabama. Rawle's use of these 9-pounders is also discussed in "Field Artillery Weapons of the Civil War."
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I live in Columbus, GA. I work in the courthouse, down town, on the 9th floor. I can look over my shoulder right now and see where this cannon was manufactured. It is now called the “Ironworks and Trade Center”. To this day, that is where we go when the gun show comes to town. It‘s a venue for conventions and large parties.
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Yep that’s a lot of money. But in the long what would it be worth?
Really depends upon the market, prior to 2008, this might have gone for a million, since it was a one of a kind with carriage and limber original to the tube.

Figure that a Walker Colt in good condition will go for around 9 figures and doesn’t carry quite the wallop.........
 
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