Tennessee 37th Infantry

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
Here is a summary of his Compiled Service Records.

Richard Angel Age 21 Pvt
Capt Edward F. Hunt's Company, 1 East Tenn Rifle Regt
Enlisted Aug 15, 1861 at Knoxville

[3] Company A Dec 1861
[4] May-June 1862 Present
[5] Jul-Aug 1862 Present
[6] Sept-Oct 1862 Present
[7] Jan-Feb 1863 Present
[8] Mch-Apl 1863 Present
[9] May-Jun 1863 Present
[10] Jul-Aug 1863 Present
[11] Sept-Oct 1863 Present
[12] Nov-Dec 1863 Present
[13] Jan-Feb 1864 Present
[14] Mch-Apl 1864 Present
[15] Sept-Oct 1864 Present
[16] Company A, 4 Consolidated Regt Tennessee Infantry
List of paroled soldiers. Paroled on 26 April 1865.

------------ Another soldier, possible relative --------
L. W. Angel Pvt
Co. A, 37 Tenn Infantry
Prisoner of War, Captured July 3, 1863, Tullahoma, Tenn
[3] List of Deserters released at Tullahoma, Tenn, allowed to go home.
Residence 4 M from Manchester

This is an intro to their organization, from "Tennesseans in the Civil War, Part 1"

Nine of the companies composing the regiment had been organized in Aug-Sept 1861.
They assembled at Camp Ramsay, near Knoxville, where the regiment was organized.
The original intention was to form a rifle brigade of three regiments, hence the name 1st Tennessee Rifles.
However, it was not possible to secure any guns of any sort, much less rifles, so the name was dropped.
Shortly after organization the regiment moved to Camp of Instruction at Camp Sam Hays, Germantown, Shelby, County.

I should know about the camp at Germantown but I don't recall any info. I will try to find out more if you are interested.
 

lelliott19

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Interesting that the birth date and date of death were hand carved in to the marker. The early VA military markers did not include the DOB and DOD. Does anyone know when they started producing official VA markers with the dates?
 
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DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
Take a tour through New England and you will find a lot of interesting headstones---many with at least one date.

49824664_126878202949.jpg
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2013
Location
Killarney, Ireland
I have been studying a unit that served in the same Brigade as the 37th Tennessee from May 1863 onward. I have a diary written by a member of the 37th Tennessee Infantry. I would be happy to try to answer any questions you might have about the Regiment.
 

Wally

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Joined
Dec 27, 2014
I have been studying a unit that served in the same Brigade as the 37th Tennessee from May 1863 onward. I have a diary written by a member of the 37th Tennessee Infantry. I would be happy to try to answer any questions you might have about the Regiment.
Thanks for the replies. The LW Angel is an ancestor but I never knew he was in the war. The photo is amazing, this forum is greatly appreciated. I would be interested to hear from some of the diary when I have a little more time to post questions. Thanks to all.
 

Barrycdog

Major
Joined
Jan 6, 2013
Location
Buford, Georgia
In Van Wert Georgia-Floyd County near Rockmart they have tombstones made of slate and some have a name stamped into them and others have it carved. The slate looks to be a soft surface.
 
Joined
May 25, 2019
Thanks for adding me.
I'm one of Jacob Kyle Blair's great grandsons. My mother saved two of her grandfather's tintype photos. i have digitally restored one of them and currently in the process of painting Jacob's portrait in oils. During the past year I've watched all the streaming Civil War documentaries over and over.....and over. Finally getting a feel for tracking Jacob's movements and some timeline between 1861 and 1865. As he was enlisted to the 37th Regiment Tennessee, I'm trying to get a clearer understanding of what became of Jacob after the Battle of Franklin Nov 22 and when he was captured 2 weeks later in Bristol, Sullivan County TN on Dec 6 1864. That's quite a fur piece up the road North almost to KY. Fold 3 dot com was helpful with Muster Roll Cards. The internet was helpful in showing me the details of some the POW prisons that Jacob lived in for the remaining months before Lee surrendered. Find-A-Grave was helpful in locating Jacob's grave for me, I plan to visit this fall and take my finished painting to show relatives what he looked like at 20 years old. Tragically, from the enormous PTSD he must have suffered from after his parole, and after he married and fathered 2 sons and my grandmother, Jacob ended his own life at 35 years old.

BLAIR Jacob Portrait_2 SMALL.jpg


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BLAIR Photo Frames.jpg
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Thanks for adding me.
I'm one of Jacob Kyle Blair's great grandsons. My mother saved two of her grandfather's tintype photos. i have digitally restored one of them and currently in the process of painting Jacob's portrait in oils. During the past year I've watched all the streaming Civil War documentaries over and over.....and over. Finally getting a feel for tracking Jacob's movements and some timeline between 1861 and 1865. As he was enlisted to the 37th Regiment Tennessee, I'm trying to get a clearer understanding of what became of Jacob after the Battle of Franklin Nov 22 and when he was captured 2 weeks later in Bristol, Sullivan County TN on Dec 6 1864. That's quite a fur piece up the road North almost to KY. Fold 3 dot com was helpful with Muster Roll Cards. The internet was helpful in showing me the details of some the POW prisons that Jacob lived in for the remaining months before Lee surrendered. Find-A-Grave was helpful in locating Jacob's grave for me, I plan to visit this fall and take my finished painting to show relatives what he looked like at 20 years old. Tragically, from the enormous PTSD he must have suffered from after his parole, and after he married and fathered 2 sons and my grandmother, Jacob ended his own life at 35 years old.

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Welcome ! Congratulations on your photo & research !

37th TN Infantry


Perryville, KY after battle report:


No. 43.

Report of Col. Moses White, Thirty-seventh Tennessee Infantry.

OCTOBER 18, 1862.
SIR: On the 7th instant the Thirty-seventh Tennessee was in position
near a creek in the vicinity of Perryville. We slept there that night. On
the morning of the 8th, after considerable maneuvering, the regiment
was advanced to a hill several hundred yards to the front and remained
there until about 1 o'clock in support [C.] Swett's and some
other battery. Between the hours of 1 and 2 p.m. we were ordered to
advance in line with Gen. Cheatham's command, which was moving
upon the enemy on our right. We advanced about 200 yards, when from
the brow of a hill we had reached we saw the enemy in line below and
received a heavy volley from them; simultaneously my men fired upon
the enemy, who immediately fell back. Several of my men were
wounded ont the first fire by the small-arms of the enemy, shells and
grape from their batteries, which swept around us in perfect showers.
I commanded my men to reload immediately, and they continued to load
and fire until we discovered that we were separated from the brigade,
which was to us a matter of no little surprise, as we had received no
command but forward. A house, outhouses, and orchard were situated
immediately to our right, which obstructed the view and prevented us
from observing the movements of the left of the brigade. Ascertaining
that it had moved in the direction of the woods to the left, I commanded
my men to march by the left flank in that direction. After passing the
orchard we discovered a regiment emerging from the woods in the rear
in the direction from which the brigade first moved; we wheeled into
line on the right of what turned out to be the Seventeenth Tennessee and
advanced to a stone wall in the hollow below, which inclosed a house,
&c., several hundred yards to the left of the house first alluded to.
Col. Marks took his position behind a wall running parallel with the
hollow. I filed right and took my position behind a post-and-rail fence
running diagonally to the wall; here we were met with an almost
overwhelming storm of lead from a corn or cane field near by. I
commanded my men to mount the fence and take position behind a
stonewall which separated the yard from the field, running parallel with
and about 50 yards distant from the wall behind which the Seventeenth
was stationed. They promptly and cheerfully obeyed the order and
immediately opened upon the enemy, I hope with some effect. The fire
raged with unabated fury for about one hour and a half, when, our
ammunition being exhausted, we were compelled to cease firing, but
were soon relieved by Gen. Cleburne, but not until the enemy had
almost ceased to fire. I had several officers and men wounded in the
fight at the wall. After the regiment was withdrawn a sufficient detail
was dispatched for ammunition and we were soon supplied. Meanwhile
we had moved to the right and advanced near the brow of the hill on
which Calvert's battery was planted. Late in the afternoon (the
Seventeenth Tennessee was again on my left) Gen. Buckner ordered
us to advance, when I gave the command "Fix bayonets," and advanced
to the summit. The Seventeenth did not advance, as I afterward learned
the order was countermanded so far as that regiment was concerned. A
battalion from the Sixteenth Alabama was soon after ordered to form on
my left and we advanced about half a mile in the field but took no
further part in the battle, as night soon set in and the firing gradually
ceased.

Maj. [J. T.] McReynolds and most of my company officers acted with
great gallantry. Individual instances of both officers and men might be
mentioned of the exhibition of the most gallant and desperate conduct.

I had 27 men wounded and some killed in the action. Their names have
been furnished by the adjutant.

Respectfully submitted.

MOSES WHITE,
Col. Thirty-seventh Tennessee Regt.

Brig.-Gen. JOHNSON.

Source: Official Records Series I. Vol. 16. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 22





***********************************************************************

Chickamagua after battle report:

Report of Col. R. C. Tyler, Fifteenth Tennessee Infantry,
commanding Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee Infantry.

HDQRS. 15TH AND 37TH REGTS. TENN. VOLS., BATE'S BRIGADE,
Camp near Chattanooga, Tenn., October 1, 1863.
SIR:I have the honor to submit the following report of the part
taken in the recent battle of Chickamauga, of the 18th, 19th, and
20th ultimo, by the Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee
Volunteers:

On the evening of the 18th, were ordered into line of battle on
left of brigade near [Alexander's] Bridge, on Chickamauga
Creek, the enemy firing heavily at the time with artillery and
small-arms, which continued for several minutes, when we
removed to a position more advanced and maintained it through
the night.

Early on the morning of the 19th, we crossed to the west side of
Chickamauga at [Thedford's] Ford, and immediately formed in
line of battle in rear of Gen.'s Brown and Clayton, on left of
brigade. Orders were at once given to advance. We were moving
in line of battle by the flank and at a rest until nearly 1 p. m.,
when a direct advance upon the enemy was ordered by our
division. Brown was soon engaged, Clayton followed, and soon
after 1 o'clock our brigade was engaged with the enemy. The
first fire delivered by my command on the enemy was within 300
or 400 yards of the road leading to Chattanooga, running parallel
with our line of battle. The firing here was for a short time
spirited and obstinate, until the enemy gave back from my
immediate front and my command ceased their fire. At this point
I lost some valuable men killed and wounded. On ceasing to fire
I ordered my men to lie down.

At this juncture, a detachment of the Fourth Alabama Infantry,
having become lost from their command, joined me, forming on
my left. They numbered about 40 or 50 men. While arranging
them in line the brigade advanced without my knowledge, and
from this time forward my command was isolated from the
brigade to which we belonged. Immediately on learning that our
brigade had moved (not knowing in what direction), I ordered an
advance directly to the front. Having moved some 50 yards, a
heavy volley of musketry was poured in upon us from a position
occupied by the enemy on the Chattanooga road not more than
250 or 300 yards in my immediate front. I ordered three times
three for Old Tennessee and a charge, both of which were
responded to with alacrity. We charged them from the hill in
utter confusion and fired several volleys upon them as they
retired to a skirt of woods some 200 yards farther on and a little
to my right. Artillery now opened upon us from the woods, and
presuming my brigade was somewhere to the right and in the
same woods, immediately formed and advanced in double-quick
across the open space until we reached the woods and learned the
exact position of the battery above mentioned. I immediately
determined to capture or drive it from its position. Advancing in
almost a run, and with the yells of demons, we soon captured
four pieces of fine artillery, the horses all having been removed
or killed. In their haste to leave the position one piece, being
charged, was left trailed upon us and not fired.

My loss in wounded in both charges was not more than 60 or 65
men, and 7 or 8 killed, among whom is numbered First
Lieut. and Adjt. John B. Kent, who, with hat in hand, was
among the foremost cheering on the men, and deeply do we
mourn his loss. Ever faithful and efficient in the discharge of his
every duty, he finally sealed his devotion to his country's cause
with his blood, and long will he be remembered in the Fifteenth
and Thirty-seventh by his companions in arms as a brave soldier
and true patriot.

We only advanced about 200 yards farther, when, not knowing
where the brigade might be, and being in danger of a flank move
from the enemy, we deemed it practicable to retrace our steps,
which we did in good order, taking our captured pieces with us
off the field.

We rejoined the brigade some 300 yards east of the Chattanooga
road, and remained in position at this point until the morning of
Sunday, the 20th, when, by a flank movement, we were removed
farther to the right, and brought into position on the brow of a
hill confronting the enemy--I should judge 400 [yards] to his front
and on a line parallel with him. At this point we hastily
constructed breastworks of such material as was at hand. We
were not permitted to remain in this position long before the
enemy opened upon us with shell, solid shot, and canister. We
lay in this position behind our breastworks until -- o'clock, when
an advance upon the enemy's works was ordered. Having
approached to within 200 yards, the fire being so destructive, our
ranks having become decimated and receiving no supports, were
compelled to retire to our breastworks, where we remained
until -- p. m.

In this advance upon the enemy we lost valuable officers and
men, among whom may be mentioned Capt. Jarnagin, of
Company K. No braver, more intrepid, and daring man strode
the field than he. We mourn his loss. It was the death he above
all others would have died--with his face to the foe and battling
for his country's liberties, leading on his gallant boys in the
charge.

At -- p. m., supports having arrived, the remnant of our little band
by a flank move changed position to the left and front of the one
previously occupied, and again advanced upon the enemy, who
now gave way and fled in utter confusion and dismay. We slept
that night within the enemy's stronghold which he had fought so
stubbornly to maintain. This being the last position of the enemy
on our part of the line, we rested on our arms at ease, after three
days of fighting and marching, having lost in all, killed and
wounded, 120 (a report of which has heretofore been reported to
your headquarters) out of 202 taken into the action on the 19th.

Where all performed their parts so nobly and so well, it seems
next to impossible to individualize; yet I cannot refrain from
bringing to your favorable notice the conduct of Maj. J. M.
Wall, Capt.'s Rice and Donaldson, of the Fifteenth; of Capt. Fry
and Sergt. Maj. John M. Farris in the action of the 19th.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

R. C. TYLER,
Col., Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee Vols.

Maj. GEORGE W. WINCHESTER,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.



Report of Lieut. Col. R. Dudley Frayser, Thirty-seventh
Tennessee Infantry, commanding Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh
Tennessee Infantry.

CAMP FIFTEENTH AND THIRTY-SEVENTH TENN. VOLS.,
October 19, 1863.
SIR:I have the honor to make the following report of the part in
which the Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee Volunteers
participated on the field of Chickamauga after the command of
said regiments devolved upon me:

About 1 o'clock on that day, Col. R. C. Tyler called to me to
assume command of the regiments. I replied, "All right, sir,"
and soon afterward ordered Capt. R. M. Tankesley, Company D,
Thirty-seventh Tennessee Volunteers, to act as major, Maj. Wall
having gone to the rear the previous afternoon. The Fifteenth and
Thirty-seventh Tennessee Volunteers at this time were on the left
of the brigade, its left being some 400 yards or more from the
main Chattanooga road. Immediately on my right, between my
command and the Fifty-eighth Alabama, were in position two
pieces of the Eufaula Light Artillery, I supposed. This battery
did not fire a shot while here; was removed soon afterward to a
more favorable position. In about fifteen minutes after I took
command, the regiments still being shielded by rudely
constructed breastworks of logs and bushes hastily thrown up, an
order came to forward from the brigadier-general commanding.
I repeated the command, and my boys moved with alacrity over
our works. Having gained some 60 or 70 yards, I ordered
double-quick with the yell, which was obeyed to a man, the men
almost assuming the run, still keeping an unbroken line. Firing
from the enemy's sharpshooters and batteries was constant in our
front, but more injury was inflicted upon us from the left flank,
there seeming to be no support on the left of Bate's brigade. On
emerging from the woods in an open, shrubby field we could see
our stubborn foe defiantly resisting our march across this field.
Grape, canister, and musket-shot here greatly decimated my
command, but swerving not it bore steadily onward. Near the
center of this field I was disabled and fell from a wound received
just below the knee, which for many minutes paralyzed my left
leg. I observed as I fell that both colors were steadily moving
forward through this dreadful ordeal of shell, shot, and fire. I lay
here many minutes entirely conscious, but unable to rise. Many
of my companions lay wounded and dead around me. Upon
seeing some of my command returning through this same field
and reporting orders having been issued to fall back, I, with their
assistance, reached the position the regiment formerly held before
this murderous charge. On my way I was handed the colors of
the Thirty-seventh Tennessee Volunteers by Mullins, Company
A, Thirty-seventh Tennessee Volunteers, the color-bearer, brave
boy, having been shot dead. Lieut. A. O. Edwards, Company A,
Thirty-seventh Tennessee Volunteers, followed after, bearing
from the field the colors of the Fifteenth Tennessee Volunteers.
After some little time I sent forward a party to bring or to assist
in bringing the wounded from the field. I feared they would
burn, as the grass and bushes were on fire. It was now near 4
o'clock. Feeling unable to hold command, and upon seeing Col.
Tyler come up from the rear, I started to the hospital. Was
soon met by a conveyance and transported thither. When
I left Col. R. C. Tyler had taken command, as I supposed.

In this short conflict death won from us many a true and brave
soldier. Would a eulogy from me mark deeper their devotion to
the cause than their death, I would cheerfully lend every humble
effort I possess to sound their praise to the skies.

I must confess no one fell on that field who more fully
exemplified the intrepid, daring, brave soldier, noble companion,
and true gentleman than Capt. C. G. Jarnagin, Company K,
Thirty-seventh Tennessee Volunteers. In the same charge were
wounded and have since died Lieut. J. C. Grayson, Company E,
and Lieut. Acuff, Company K, Thirty-seventh Tennessee
Volunteers. In this brace of lieutenants death claims a shining
mark of valor and acknowledged merit.

I could call your attention to many of my men, isolated cases,
now surviving, who dared danger most and more ardently
seemed to woo death, but where none flickered from the measure
of their whole duty I desist, knowing that a thankful country will
render bountiful homage to all.

For efficiency, gallantry, and prompt obedience on the part of
my officers engaged under my command I commend to your
favor Lieut. W. H. Pipes, Fifteenth Tennessee Volunteers; Capt.
R. M. Tankesley, Company D; Lieut. A. O. Edwards, Company
A; and Sergt. Maj. J. M. Farris, Thirty-seventh Tennessee
Volunteers.

I am, respectfully, major,

R. DUDLEY FRAYSER,
Lieut. Col., Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee Vols.

Maj. GEORGE W. WINCHESTER,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

-----------


Report of Capt. R. M. Tankesley, Thirty-seventh Tennessee
Infantry, commanding Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee
Infantry.

CAMP FIFTEENTH AND THIRTY-SEVENTH TENN. VOLS.,
October 19, 1863.

SIR:I have the honor to make this report of what part the
Fifteenth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee Regt.'s did while under
my command on September 20. In the severe charge Lieut.-Col.
Frayser was disabled somewhere in the field. The regiment was
still advancing when I missed Col. Frayser. I took charge, and
seeing the whole brigade fall back and no support on the left, I
led the remnant of the regiment to our former position.
Lieut.-Col. Frayser soon came up and retook command. Col.
Tyler soon after came up and took command, he (Col. Tyler)
having been disabled in the morning. Lieut.-Col. Frayser left
when the command commenced to move by the left flank. The
command then moved by the right flank and took a position in
front of our breastworks of logs, &c. This was, I think, about
5.30 p. m. Col. Tyler and Lieut.-Col. Frayser had been urged to
go to the rear, as they could do no good in their disabled
condition. I was then again left in command. A charge was
ordered, when my little remnant of valorous men bore forward;
a sharp fire from our batteries was just ceasing; some few Minie
balls greeted us. On reaching
the enemy's works what was our delight to see the once
defiant foe surrendering. It seemed between 200 and 300
prisoners. The brigade encamped that night on the battle-field to
the right of the Chattanooga road.

I was in command when Lieut.-Col. Frayser came up on the
morning of September 21, and took command. Col. Tyler and
Maj. Wall soon came up, and Col. Tyler took command of the
regiment. All acted so nobly their part in every particular I
refrain from distinguishing any one.

I am, most respectfully, &c.,

R. M. TANKESLEY,
Capt. Company D, 15th and 37th Tennessee Vols.

Maj. GEORGE W. WINCHESTER,
[Acting] Assistant Adjutant-Gen.
-----------

Source: Official Records
PAGE 395-51 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. [CHAP. XLII.
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 51.]
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
I'm trying to get a clearer understanding of what became of Jacob after the Battle of Franklin Nov 22 and when he was captured 2 weeks later in Bristol, Sullivan County TN on Dec 6, 1864.

Jacob was apparently hospitalized in Bristol and captured there.

https://www.heraldcourier.com/news/...cle_fda0d902-ce72-11e3-b891-001a4bcf6878.html

http://civilwarrx.blogspot.com/2015/10/the-confederate-hospital-in-bristol.html

http://southernhistorians.org/21-sh...cine-and-death-by-disease-1850-1885/21-47-02/
 
Joined
May 25, 2019
THANKS SO MUCH FOR HELPING ME, THIS IS APPRECIATED. WILL HAVE TO VISIT BRISTOL. JACOB LEFT BRISTOL FOR LOUISVILLE PRISON, THEN CAMP CHASE OHIO PRISON AND THEN FINALLY POINT LOOKOUT PRISON IN MARYLAND VIA STEAMSHIP MARY POWELL.
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
THANKS SO MUCH FOR HELPING ME, THIS IS APPRECIATED. WILL HAVE TO VISIT BRISTOL. JACOB LEFT BRISTOL FOR LOUISVILLE PRISON, THEN CAMP CHASE OHIO PRISON AND THEN FINALLY POINT LOOKOUT PRISON IN MARYLAND VIA STEAMSHIP MARY POWELL.

You're very welcome ! Louisville was the destination of most all Confederates captured in the western theater. It was determined there what prison they would be sent to. If any desired to take the Oath of Allegiance and remain "north of the Ohio River" for the duration, they didn't have far to go.
 

Zella

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 23, 2018
Welcome! You've got a lot of great artifacts connected to him! It's a shame he committed suicide. :frown:

You're very welcome ! Louisville was the destination of most all Confederates captured in the western theater. It was determined there what prison they would be sent to. If any desired to take the Oath of Allegiance and remain "north of the Ohio River" for the duration, they didn't have far to go.
Several of my North Carolinians ended up at Louisville with the "north of the Ohio River" requirement. One of them almost immediately disobeyed that rule and bolted for Chattanooga, and every time I see that bitter note in his CSR, it makes me laugh so hard. :bounce:
 
Joined
May 25, 2019
Is there a way to find out if a 37th TN infantryman was killed in battle or not? William Blair 17 yrs old is listed as a member of the 37th along with his brother Jacob 20 yrs old (my great grandpa) They enlisted on the same date in 1861 in Knoxville. I can't find anything else about William except an enlistment Muster Roll Card. I realize that so many of our boys were killed without ID. Jacob survived.
 
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