Summer Sheers my dears!

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Mrs. V

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I bought fabric..big surprise! It’s a lavendar semi sheer with tone on tone stripes. It’s cotton. I have a pattern, but I am wondering if anyone knows if they used French Seams in the CW era. I can see on the bodice, where a French seam would keep things from unravelling, especially the sleeves and the side seams..but the curved seams in back?? *sigh* At least the pattern calls for flat lining, as is period correct...I may or may not get this done for Hale Farms

Finished it in time for Hale Farm. It was very well received. I made the petticoat using a dust ruffle I bought at a thrift store for it’s battenburg lace.

35BB0B47-129B-4DCA-905C-C9F2C0A535F7.jpeg
 

JPK Huson 1863

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Ok, that's just charming. You can even see where this kind of dress could be worn in dreadful heat. It looks so light! Is it? May I ask if your purse is what was called a ' reticule ' or is that something else?

Had to look up your French Seam ( because that's what uninformed dingbats have to do in these discussions ). Pretty sure they did use them? That's based more on Demorest's and Godey's than any photograph. IMO if they could make sewing even more difficult, they did!
 

DBF

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Finished it in time for Hale Farm. It was very well received. I made the petticoat using a dust ruffle I bought at a thrift store for it’s battenburg lace.
This is so beautiful. I envy you with you sewing ability - never quite took to it. The color is a good summer color. I so happy you posted this - and I'm sure it was "very well received".
 
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Mrs. V

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Ok, that's just charming. You can even see where this kind of dress could be worn in dreadful heat. It looks so light! Is it? May I ask if your purse is what was called a ' reticule ' or is that something else?

Had to look up your French Seam ( because that's what uninformed dingbats have to do in these discussions ). Pretty sure they did use them? That's based more on Demorest's and Godey's than any photograph. IMO if they could make sewing even more difficult, they did!
It was very light and cool. Well, as cool as you can be with 80% humidity and bright, bright sun! I did not use french seams, as they seemed too bulky for the fabric. The battenburg lace petticoat you see started life as a dust ruffle for a bed. I paid 2.50 for it, and did not know it showed until I saw the pictures! Lol! It does look nice, and I was so worried my skirts were going to be too small. And yes, the purse is called a “reticule”. I hide my farb stuff in it! And the basket hides all sorts of non-period items as well as gingersnap cookies, a china tea cup, and emergency thread, safety pins etc.
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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I hide my farb stuff in it!

Ok, what does ' farb ' mean please? I keep seeing the term! It's driving me a little crazy.

Aren't you in good company carrying pins? Read somewhere ladies carried pins with them in case someone stepped on their hems and an on the spot repair had to be achieved. Guessing it happened a LOT.
 

Mrs. V

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Ok, what does ' farb ' mean please? I keep seeing the term! It's driving me a little crazy.

Aren't you in good company carrying pins? Read somewhere ladies carried pins with them in case someone stepped on their hems and an on the spot repair had to be achieved. Guessing it happened a LOT.
“Farb” means something that is not period correct. My most “farb” item is my glasses. Think wearing your wrist watch, or sometimes it’s a dress that is modern, but worn with a hoop because the skirts are full. Or a pair of loafers worn in lieu of brogans or boots for the guys. I would never call anyone out, as some do, because I recognize that people are making an effort, with the budget that they have. And I am still piece-mealing my impression!

Pins would have been straight pins, you sometimes see them on bodices (tops). I have the safety pin style, and they were not around them.
 
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Ok, what does ' farb ' mean please? I keep seeing the term! It's driving me a little crazy.
Annie, I'm glad you asked this, because after I joined, I read that word everywhere and also never knew what it meant until one of our reenactors here explained it to me. @Mrs. V beat me explaining what it means.
The origin of the word "farb" may even be German (although frankly I find that a bit far fetched), coming from the German word "Farbe" (color), because modern fabrics, dyed with artificial colors are often too colorful, authentic fabrics would have been of a more pale color.
 

Mrs. V

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Annie, I'm glad you asked this, because after I joined, I read that word everywhere and also never knew what it meant until one of our reenactors here explained it to me. @Mrs. V beat me explaining what it means.
The origin of the word "farb" may even be German (although frankly I find that a bit far fetched), coming from the German word "Farbe" (color), because modern fabrics, dyed with artificial colors are often too colorful, authentic fabrics would have been of a more pale color.
Analine dyes are the reason the fabrics are not as vibrant as some of the modern ones. And then there’s the arsenic green gowns...I suppose if you were super pale complected, you could do an impression of a lady being slowly poisoned by her gown...:giggle:
 

Belle Montgomery

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Annie, I'm glad you asked this, because after I joined, I read that word everywhere and also never knew what it meant until one of our reenactors here explained it to me. @Mrs. V beat me explaining what it means.
The origin of the word "farb" may even be German (although frankly I find that a bit far fetched), coming from the German word "Farbe" (color), because modern fabrics, dyed with artificial colors are often too colorful, authentic fabrics would have been of a more pale color.
Farb or Farby comes from "far be it from real" or "far be it from authentic"
 
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Belle Montgomery

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I bought fabric..big surprise! It’s a lavendar semi sheer with tone on tone stripes. It’s cotton. I have a pattern, but I am wondering if anyone knows if they used French Seams in the CW era. I can see on the bodice, where a French seam would keep things from unravelling, especially the sleeves and the side seams..but the curved seams in back?? *sigh* At least the pattern calls for flat lining, as is period correct...I may or may not get this done for Hale Farms

Finished it in time for Hale Farm. It was very well received. I made the petticoat using a dust ruffle I bought at a thrift store for it’s battenburg lace.

View attachment 320430
You were more then well received...you were LOVED by all! Especially for being able to lead the congregation in song at the front of the church with Minister Col. Skip Wilson! One photo that Gen Sam Cooper took of you, Regan and myself he captioned "The dynamic trio!" Can't wait to see you at Zoar!
 
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Farb or Farby comes from "far be it from real" or "far be it from authentic"
That sounds a lot more like it!

But before I posted I had googled the origin to see if that German origin I had been told of is somewhere documented, and indeed, I found this:

Etymology

Disputed. Various explanations of the origin are given:

  • That it is a contraction of the phrase "far be it from me to criticize anyone, but...", or of "far below" (the expected standard).
  • That it comes from the German word Farbe ("colour") (many fabrics dyed with modern dyes are "too colourful" to be authentic, by comparison with their historical originals).
  • There exists a letter dated 1 April 1863 from an A.R. Crawford in the 76th Illinois Infantry, Co D, that uses the phrase, "fallacious accoutrements & reprehensible baggage," in description of six children posing in phony military gear during a sham reenactment that took place during the actual Civil War. Many point to this phrase as the origin of the word, citing "farb" as an acronym.
  • Many early replica rifles were marked with what looked like "F.A.R.B" among the proofmarks.
    B%22_marking_on_early_Italian_Zouave_rifle_replica.jpg

"FARB" mark on a replica rifle
Removing this would make the rifle look more authentic, and "defarb" spread to making other objects more authentic.

https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=farb&oldid=53187808
 

JPK Huson 1863

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although frankly I find that a bit far fetched

You mean farb fetched? ( sorry..... ) I'm glad to know I wasn't the only one! Had to ask because as you say we see the term frequently.

My most “farb” item is my glasses
DO some reenactors have period correct glasses? That could get expensive in a big hurry. If it's any comfort to reenactors most of us out here just don't know a lot about these details- we're just attracted by what seems a walking, camping documentary on the war.

Can't wait to see you at Zoar

Bring back photos please!
 
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Mrs. V

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You mean farb fetched? ( sorry..... ) I'm glad to know I wasn't the only one! Had to ask because as you say we see the term frequently.



DO some reenactors have period correct glasses? That could get expensive in a big hurry. If it's any comfort to reenactors most of us out here just don't know a lot about these details- we're just attracted by what seems a walking, camping documentary on the war.




Bring back photos please!
Yes, some do have period correct glasses. I have sort of a complicated script because I have astigmatism. I need to find a place that will put lenses in a frame too.
 

ami

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farb actually used to be a banned word here on CWT, but people have shown restraint in using it. so a few years ago we let it back in. Used in this context it's not so bad, but can be really insulting if used in a mean way.
 
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Mrs. V

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farb actually used to be a banned word here on CWT, but people have shown restraint in using it. so a few years ago we let it back in. Used in this context it's not so bad, but can be really insulting if used in a mean way.
Now we talk about people who are stitch witches. Honestly it is what keeps people from coming into the hobby, is the fear someone will be mean. It’s really bullying in a historical context. Did I see some outfits this weekend that were..umm..no? Yeah, did I comment, no. I recognize that not everyone has tons of money, not everyone who starts has time to do tons of research..and they might come back and improve, just by being there and seeing what looks right. We learn by doing.
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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So ' farb ' was an accusation, not a description? Interesting! What's more interesting is hearing reenactors push back when it comes to who would be welcome to participate. It's genuinely nice to hear. I have two professions and managed to pick two of the least ' welcoming '. Boy does it get old.
 

Mrs. V

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So ' farb ' was an accusation, not a description? Interesting! What's more interesting is hearing reenactors push back when it comes to who would be welcome to participate. It's genuinely nice to hear. I have two professions and managed to pick two of the least ' welcoming '. Boy does it get old.
Yup, both a description and an accusation all rolled into one very annoying ball. I hear you on the “not welcoming” profession. I work in a profession that is predominately women. Most of whom do like it if you push back at an added duty, or by saying “no” to a demand.
 
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