1. Welcome to the CivilWarTalk, a forum for questions and discussions about the American Civil War! Become a member today for full access to all of our resources, it's fast, simple, and absolutely free!
Dismiss Notice
Join and Become a Patron at CivilWarTalk!
Support this site with a monthly or yearly subscription! Active Patrons get to browse the site Ad free!
START BY JOINING NOW!

Question about Corinth

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by Keiri, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. Keiri

    Keiri Corporal

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    478
    In the book Nanzig, T. P. (2002). "The Badax Tigers: From Shiloh to the surrender with the 18th Wisconsin Volunteers" it is said that Corinth at the time of the war was about 3 years old. Several pages later it's said that Corinth had old-fashioned homes and these were used as hospitals. Quiner snipped an article for the 16th infantry that said: Neat, one-story cottages were in a part of town. Citizens inhabited some but others the Union officers used as hospitals.
    Okay, so, what was "old-fashioned" to a person in 1862? Were the homes only 3 years old? Did he mean these one-story cottages? I want to get a mental picture. Any thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
    Mike Serpa, mofederal and WJC like this.

  2. (Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
  3. ucvrelics.com

    ucvrelics.com 1st Lieutenant Forum Host

    Joined:
    May 7, 2016
    Messages:
    4,151
    Location:
    Alabama
    Corinth officially became a town in 1853 originally it was Cross City but before that they were several large plantations in the area around Corinth and Farmington. The M&O and the M&C railroads crossed there (Cross City) which is why it was so important during the CW.
     
    Mike Serpa, mofederal, WJC and 3 others like this.
  4. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2013
    Messages:
    11,856
    Location:
    Mississippi
    Corinth was a relatively "new/modern" town during the War.

    I can't imagine any structure in that area would be considered old-fashioned by 1860's standards.
     
    mofederal likes this.
  5. WJC

    WJC Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2015
    Messages:
    7,625
    Just to add to what @ucvrelics.com said, based on the development around that time of towns in the midwest, there were probably some old, log houses, perhaps at a crossroads. These might have been upgraded by then with wood siding over the log walls. If my guess is right, these log homes would be the "old-fashioned homes", while newer homes- including the plantation 'Big House's"- would represent the new community.
     
    mofederal likes this.
  6. mofederal

    mofederal Captain

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2017
    Messages:
    5,286
    Location:
    Southeast Missouri
    Any kind of log structure would have been considered an old style. Cabins with plank siding. Double pens, simple one or two story structures. Any simple structure housing people. Maybe even some simple romance style of housing. Simple frame houses. It would have been an older style of house by then. A lot of housing styles had been in use by that time. There are old images of Corinth out there to view. That might help you.
     
  7. Keiri

    Keiri Corporal

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    478
    You folks are fabulous. Thank you so much!
     
  8. Keiri

    Keiri Corporal

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    478
    Eric Calistri and WJC like this.
  9. WJC

    WJC Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2015
    Messages:
    7,625
    ucvrelics.com likes this.

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)

Share This Page


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)