Morgan's Bull Pups?

Joined
Aug 7, 2017
Messages
120
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
#1
At the First Battle of Cynthiana and the engagement at Augusta, John H. Morgan's command had a section of small six-pounders, light enough to only require two horses for the gun team, and I have also seen described as mountain guns. However, when I try to find more info on six-pounder mountain howitzers, I am not having much luck in finding pictures or illustrations. Ideally I am trying to see if anyone makes a reproduction of a bull pup for a potential tour stop and interpretation. Anyone have any info for me regarding the bull pups?

Thanks!
 

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Coonewah Creek

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 1, 2018
Messages
1,017
Location
Northern Alabama
#3
Anyone have any info for me regarding the bull pups?
This little description is taken from the:

HISTORY OF MORGAN'S CAVALRY
By BASIL W. DUKE


"It was some months before each company of the regiment was armed with the same or similar guns. Nearly every man had a pistol, and some two. Shortly afterward, when they were captured in sufficient numbers, each man was provided with a pair. The pistol preferred and usually worn by the men, was the army Colt furnished to the Federal cavalry regiments—this patent is far the best and most effective of any I have ever seen. At this time two mountain howitzers were sent from Richmond for Morgan's use. It is unnecessary to describe a piece so well known, but it may be as well to say, that no gun is so well adapted in all respects to the wants of cavalry, as these little guns. With a large command, it is always well enough to have two or four pieces of longer range and yet of light draught, such as the three-inch Parrot—but if I were required to dispense with one or the other, I would choose to retain the former. They can be drawn (with a good supply of ammunition in the limbers), by two horses over any kind of road. They can go over ravines, up hills, through thickets, almost any where, in short, that a horseman can go; they can be taken, without attracting attention, in as close proximity to the enemy as two horsemen can go—they throw shell with accuracy eight hundred yards, quite as far as there is any necessity for, generally in cavalry fighting—they throw canister and grape, two and three hundred yards, as effectively as a twelve pounder—they can be carried by hand right along with the line, and as close to the enemy as the line goes—and they make a great deal more noise than one would suppose from their size and appearance. If the carriages are well made, they can stand very hard service, and they are easily repaired, if injured. These little guns were attached to the Second Kentucky, and the men of that regiment became much attached to them. They called them familiarly and affectionately, the "bull pups," and cheered them whenever they were taken into a fight. They remained with us, doing excellent service, until just before the Ohio raid; and, then, when General Bragg's ordnance officer arbitrarily took them away from us, it came near raising a mutiny in the regiment. I would, myself, have gladly seen him tied to the muzzle of one of them and shot off. They were captured by the enemy in two weeks after they were taken from us."
 



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