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Lost Confederate Gold ?

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by Henry Brown, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. Henry Brown

    Henry Brown Private

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  3. archieclement

    archieclement Sergeant

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    All I can offer is opinion because there appears very little factual known.

    During the Civil War both sides at various times believed there was a Northwest Conspiracy with shadowy clandestine para-military organizations such as OAK's Order of American Knights or the KGC Knights of the Golden Circle. In the end both sides apparently came to the conclusion they were largely fantasy. Not to say some may have played in some pseudo secret society, but it apparently had no strength to actually do much of anything

    One is tempted to put it to bed as complete fantasy but there was the Paw Paw rebellion in Missouri in 64, and during Prices raid most any town garrisoned with EMM yielded promptly which can make one wonder if their was some degree of prior cooperation.

    A book I have ends talking about them "In the end, the "Northwestern Conspiracy" remains as convoluted and subject to individual interpretation today as it did at the time." seems pretty much the case

    What has always struck me really odd is when one try's to connect it to Danville and the Confederate Treasury......They were supposed to exist in the Northern states mainly in the Midwest.........so not seeing if they even did exist, a connection to the south and the east where the treasury retreated.............Because in the South secret societies weren't needed, if one wanted to aid the CSA, you just enlisted in the army..............
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
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  4. Story

    Story First Sergeant

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    Oooh, oooh! I know what happened to it, Mista Kottah!
     
  5. christian soldier

    christian soldier Sergeant

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    Henry. There is a small paperback or softcover book on the lost Confederate gold written by two treasure hunters from Warrenton, Virginia. I think the title might be something like "Lost Confederate Gold." One of the authors has a direct ancestor who supposedly was apart of the K.G.C. The television show that novelist Brad Melzer hosted did an episode with these two men and Melzer's three colleagues. I cannot remember the name of the show off the top of my head. Sorry. David.
     
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  6. Henry Brown

    Henry Brown Private

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    maybe my title should have read "silver" ?
    apart from the gold and specie from the treasury ,this is the first i've heard of the mexican silver.

    "An aspect of the treasure that Clark omitted concerned the fate of 39 kegs of Mexican silver dollars. These were coins that the Confederacy received through the sale of cotton to Mexico. The Mexican coins had been transported to Danville, Virginia, and when the Davis party was forced to move further south, primarily by wagon, the more than 9,000 pounds of silver would have considerably slowed down the procession. For this reason, the coins were almost certainly buried in Danville, and evidence suggests, they remain there today." [ from above link.]

    also this guy mumford. did he buy seed corn to start the confederados in south america ? where did that money come from ?

    and i read some stuff about benjamin's escape and he may have given much of the money to relatives during his escape.

    "With one companion, Benjamin travelled south in a poor carriage, pretending to be a Frenchman who spoke no English. He had some gold with him, and left much of it for the support of relatives."
    "He had money in the United Kingdom as he had, during the war, purchased cotton for transport to Liverpool by blockade runner."
     
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  7. Jimklag

    Jimklag Major Forum Host Silver Patron Trivia Game Winner

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  8. mofederal

    mofederal 2nd Lieutenant

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    There was that old Jesse James doc on the history channel about the KGC and lost gold, money caches and the like. Some money was found, but not a lot. People on the run from the law bleed money, plus you had to share with the gang members. I also had a lot of trouble with the credibility of those involved. They were all tied to that Jesse James was not assassinated in 1882 idea. Amazing how none of those people had James family DNA.
     
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  9. Henry Brown

    Henry Brown Private

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    yeah i watched the WHOLE thing. grrrr Geraldo ... :furious:
    that money is long gone except for maybe a small cache or two. it is interesting that most all the La./ Miss./Texas leaders were either captured or made it to europe, where mason and slidell were (slidell from La and mason from Va), and found good fortune. when they were released or returned home they all found even greater fortune (slidell did , mason not so much) and most wound up deeply embedded in the cotton industry. does this hint at a conspiracy within the confederacy ? the whole thing was done in like manner to the building of the high seas commerce raiders.
     
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  10. mofederal

    mofederal 2nd Lieutenant

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    I know how one of Virginia's rich family's kept their money. They bought some Confederate bonds, but sent most of the money up to Philadelphia, investing it up north with his wife's family. They had a lot of money after the war.
     
  11. W117Monte

    W117Monte Private

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    i saw a movie on this once.... oh wait, it was Time Cop with Van Damme
     
  12. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    PawPaw Rebellion? Is that the one concerning the French Catholic in Missouri? This is pretty interesting. Things like that make it more convincing why some people tried to get Forrest to go join up with Jo Shelby to fight in the Trans-Mississippi and why Davis thought they had a chance there. I didn't get to watch the video - maybe it will connect later - but it seems to me the Confederate government didn't have any money to squirrel somewhere anyway! Individual Confederates might be another matter, though...
     
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  13. mofederal

    mofederal 2nd Lieutenant

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    The Paw Paw Rebellion happened in the summer of 1864, involved the Enrolled Missouri Militia in Northwest Missouri. The insurrection was led by Confederate recruiter Lt. Colonel John C. Calhoun (Coon) Thornton. The Union forces were the Missouri State Militia from St. Joseph, the EMM from St. Joseph, Weston and Platte City. The Paw Paw name came from the tree of that name, whose leaves were sometimes worn in the hats of the EMM in the area. The loyalty of the EMM in that area was somewhat questionable. During the summer, Commander of the District of North Missouri, Gen. Clinton B. Fisk said the Paw Paw Militia almost to a man "declared" themselves for Thornton. he also said many people in the area, now openly declared themselves for "Jeff."

    The Federal response was swift, and the 2nd Colorado Cavalry and the 15th Kansas Cavalry under Jennison descended on Camden Point in a surprise attack on Col. Thornton and 200-300 of his men. Thornton and his men were having a large picnic in an open pasture near town, when the federal attack occurred. They routed Thornton, killing between 6 and 15, and they captured and executed some of the men. Only 6 men are listed on a nearby memorial. Federal losses were 4 dead and 1 wounded. The numbers differ depending on whom you read. Some US Army sources today call what happened a war crime. Thornton also lost arms, ammunition and powder (said to have been captured at Camp Jackson). A large portion of Camden Point was also burned down. A Jayhawker habit. A second clash between the federals and Thornton at Fredericksburg in Ray County, effectively ended the uprising and the Paw Paw Militia.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
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  14. mofederal

    mofederal 2nd Lieutenant

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    https://camdenpoint.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/cp-thornton-flag.pdf

    Thornton's men carried a colorful flag having been made from a local lady's cream colored wedding dress. The flag had sixteen stars at one end and the words "Protect Missouri" on the other end, with a red border around the flag. The Protect Missouri flag was presented to Thornton was presented to him at the picnic. The flag still exists today, see link.
     

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