Restricted Lincoln and Colonization

5fish

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Another bad moment showing Lincoln racist bias...

For much of his political career, Lincoln, like his political idol Henry Clay, was an advocate of colonization, based on his belief that "the great mass of white people" would refuse to extend equal rights to African Americans. This assumption and prediction, Lincoln believed, "whether well or ill-founded, cannot be safely disregarded."

In 1862, the President met with a group of African Americans at the White House (no previous President had dreamed of inviting blacks to the White House), and, in what was perhaps the lowest point of his presidency, seemed to blame blacks for the Civil War and predicted that they would have to migrate overseas. Lincoln said "your race are suffering, in my judgment, the greatest wrong inflicted on any people...but on this broad continent, not a single man of your race is made the equal of a single man of ours."

Frederick Douglass condemned the President's remarks. "No sincere wish to improve the condition of the oppressed has dictated" his words, Douglass wrote. “It expresses merely the desire to get rid of them, and reminds one of the politeness with which a man might try to bow out of his house some troublesome creditor or the witness of some old guilt."

In that year, 450 African Americans were recruited to settle on the Island of Vache, off the coast of present-day Haiti. Small pox and mismanagement by a white government-appointed manager contributed to the colony's failure. The transport ship dispatched by President Lincoln picked up only 368 survivors.

Here is a note of Lincoln's failed colonization project...

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtID=2&psid=3087
 

leftyhunter

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los angeles ca
Another bad moment showing Lincoln racist bias...

For much of his political career, Lincoln, like his political idol Henry Clay, was an advocate of colonization, based on his belief that "the great mass of white people" would refuse to extend equal rights to African Americans. This assumption and prediction, Lincoln believed, "whether well or ill-founded, cannot be safely disregarded."

In 1862, the President met with a group of African Americans at the White House (no previous President had dreamed of inviting blacks to the White House), and, in what was perhaps the lowest point of his presidency, seemed to blame blacks for the Civil War and predicted that they would have to migrate overseas. Lincoln said "your race are suffering, in my judgment, the greatest wrong inflicted on any people...but on this broad continent, not a single man of your race is made the equal of a single man of ours."

Frederick Douglass condemned the President's remarks. "No sincere wish to improve the condition of the oppressed has dictated" his words, Douglass wrote. “It expresses merely the desire to get rid of them, and reminds one of the politeness with which a man might try to bow out of his house some troublesome creditor or the witness of some old guilt."

In that year, 450 African Americans were recruited to settle on the Island of Vache, off the coast of present-day Haiti. Small pox and mismanagement by a white government-appointed manager contributed to the colony's failure. The transport ship dispatched by President Lincoln picked up only 368 survivors.

Here is a note of Lincoln's failed colonization project...

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtID=2&psid=3087
Marcus Garvey was in favor of black immigration to Africa. Malcolm X's father was a supporter of Garvey has were many blacks at the time.
So colonization is not in and of itself racist. It is more akin to Zionism the search for a better homeland.
Leftyhunter
 

5fish

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Location
Central Florida
So colonization is not in and of itself racist. It is more akin to Zionism the search for a better homeland.
Leftyhunter

Lincoln colonization plans were all based on racism...

Marcus Garvey was in favor of black immigration to Africa.

Even Garvey's vision has a sense of racism in it...

Garvey's version of Black Nationalism argued that African Americans' quest for social equality was a delusion. They were fated to be a permanent minority who could never assimilate because white Americans would never let them. African Americans, therefore, could not improve their condition or gain autonomy in the United States. Only in Africa was self-emancipation possible.
 

leftyhunter

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Location
los angeles ca
Lincoln colonization plans were all based on racism...



Even Garvey's vision has a sense of racism in it...

Garvey's version of Black Nationalism argued that African Americans' quest for social equality was a delusion. They were fated to be a permanent minority who could never assimilate because white Americans would never let them. African Americans, therefore, could not improve their condition or gain autonomy in the United States. Only in Africa was self-emancipation possible.
Being that Marcus Garvey most likely wrote that in the 1920s Garvey was actually just telling it like it was. In the 1860s colonization made sense other then the huge caveat it was not logistically feasible.
Leftyhunter
 

leftyhunter

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What about when taken into context with blatant racist comments ?
One does not have to be racist to support colonization although some racists supported colonization. For example Marcus Garvey reportedly received funds from racists.
Colonization was not a bad idea but it was an impracticable idea.
Leftyhunter
 

Viper21

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One does not have to be racist to support colonization although some racists supported colonization. For example Marcus Garvey reportedly received funds from racists.
Colonization was not a bad idea but it was an impracticable idea.
Leftyhunter
Come on man..... you're dodging the elephant in the room. Don't give an inch eh..? lol My comment was specifically about Lincoln.

Are you saying that Lincoln was not racist ..?
 
Another bad moment showing Lincoln racist bias...

For much of his political career, Lincoln, like his political idol Henry Clay, was an advocate of colonization, based on his belief that "the great mass of white people" would refuse to extend equal rights to African Americans. This assumption and prediction, Lincoln believed, "whether well or ill-founded, cannot be safely disregarded."

In 1862, the President met with a group of African Americans at the White House (no previous President had dreamed of inviting blacks to the White House), and, in what was perhaps the lowest point of his presidency, seemed to blame blacks for the Civil War and predicted that they would have to migrate overseas. Lincoln said "your race are suffering, in my judgment, the greatest wrong inflicted on any people...but on this broad continent, not a single man of your race is made the equal of a single man of ours."

Frederick Douglass condemned the President's remarks. "No sincere wish to improve the condition of the oppressed has dictated" his words, Douglass wrote. “It expresses merely the desire to get rid of them, and reminds one of the politeness with which a man might try to bow out of his house some troublesome creditor or the witness of some old guilt."

In that year, 450 African Americans were recruited to settle on the Island of Vache, off the coast of present-day Haiti. Small pox and mismanagement by a white government-appointed manager contributed to the colony's failure. The transport ship dispatched by President Lincoln picked up only 368 survivors.

Here is a note of Lincoln's failed colonization project...

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtID=2&psid=3087



Lincoln shared a good portion of the blame for the Ile a Vache (Cow Island) fiasco when he failed to assign subordinates to investigate the background of Bernard Kock who claimed to have leased the island from Haiti. Lincoln had authorized $250,000 to settle 5,000 Blacks who volunteered to emigrate to the island, under the original contract but it was never signed and Seward kept possession of it until the funding was cancelled in early 1863. A couple of wealthy investors then offered to fund Kock and they convinced Lincoln to renegotiate a contract with them rather than Kock where the two investors would receive reimbursement from the United States for the emigration and settlement of 500 Blacks to the island under the direct supervision of Kock. Lincoln had Seward draw up the contract and he gave the finished copy to Charles Tuckerman, one of the investors, to look over. The contract Seward authored had a number of stipulations that had to be met prior to any signatures, one of them being that Haiti must approve of the plan and offer support to the new Black immigrants on the island. Tuckerman waited for some time before bypassing Seward and going directly with his signed copy of the contract to Lincoln for the president's signature. Tuckerman told Lincoln that all the preliminaries had been met and he thrust the contract before Lincoln asking for his signature. Lincoln failed to thoroughly read it, giving it a cursory look-over before he signed it.

By mid year 1863, 453 Blacks were settled at the colony. Under the terms of the contract they were to be given land, a house, medical care, and an education. Kock failed to provide much of anything for them and poisonous snakes and insects as well as disease began taking its toll. By the end of the year Lincoln learned that they had been abandoned by Kock and had received no support from Haiti with nearly 100 of them having died. On February 8, 1864 Lincoln ordered the United States Navy to bring back to the U.S. any of the Black colonists who wished to return. All 368 survivors returned.

Lincoln's colonization plans were always based on Blacks volunteering for patriation and there are numerous records of Lincoln's insistence that all colonization be strictly on a volunteer basis. Following Lincoln's 1863 meeting with Frederick Douglass where his viewpoints on colonization were voiced to the president, and the Cow Island tragedy, there is little further mention of colonization by Lincoln from that point forward.
 

leftyhunter

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los angeles ca
It may have been in fashion in the 1800's for all the wrong reasons but morally wrong...
I would argue not morally wrong if it could of been accomplished in a humane and efficient manner. The problem was the logistical and financial support necessary to make it work is staggering.
Leftyhunter
 

5fish

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Location
Central Florida
A look...

Lincoln On Slavery, March 3, 1837 - April 11, 1865.

https://www.nps.gov/liho/learn/historyculture/slavery.htm

Abraham Lincoln is often referred to as "The Great Emancipator" and yet, he did not publicly call for emancipation throughout his entire life.

The following are summaries of Lincoln's words...

Lincoln, in a speech at Peoria, attacked slavery on the grounds that its existence within the United States made American democracy appear hypocritical in the eyes of the world. However, he also confessed his uncertainty as to how to end slavery where it then existed, because he believed that neither colonization nor racial equality was practical.

In this speech at Chicago, Lincoln reiterated his hatred of slavery and also his belief that it should not be touched where it then existed.

During the fifth debate, Lincoln claimed that slavery ran counter to American democratic principles because the Declaration of Independence's phrase - "all men are created equal" applied to African-Americans.


Some feared that Lincoln was recommending social and political equality between the races. Writing to James N. Brown, Lincoln discounted this belief although seven years later


I read what was posted and he sounds like a politician, not a man that passionately hated slavery. I notice they left out his Black people are inferior to White people words...

He did little to nothing to end slavery in Illinois...

He saw the passing of the Nebraska /Kansas act as his way back into politics...

He was at best a political moderate when it came to slavery in his time...
 
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Bee

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Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Gettysburg 2017
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Dec 21, 2015
Abraham Lincoln is often referred to as "The Great Emancipator" and yet, he did not publicly call for emancipation throughout his entire life.


Psst! I think it's great that you are catching up on things regarding history, but here is a hot flash: Just about everyone else I know on this forum knows that Lincoln's first words at birth was not "Emancipation!!!!", so don't be disappointed if there is not a chorus of outrage at discovering and sharing this.
 
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Joined
Oct 3, 2005
I mean its pretty silly. The Confederates weren't debating black citizenship, they were fighting tooth and nail to keep blacks people slaves, and defining them as fit for nothing but slaves. In the free states, the only place this argument was being conducted, the debate over black people as citizens raged between Lincoln and the Republicans mostly in favor, and the northern Democrats mostly against. People often complain that we are judging people by 21st century standards, not 19th century standards. Yet what is this?

Compared to the 19th century people up in arms about the horrors of black citizenship, Lincoln sounds like Malcolm X.
 
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